Kenneth Fernandes

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Are there any single-driver bookshelf speakers from budget to very high-end that have a frequency response range from ~100Hz to 20KHz and above for home Hi-Fi use? That could be paired with a sub-woofer and accordingly adjust the frequency cut-off at the sub-woofer end that match the bookshelf speaker's starting frequency. Like the ones without any crossovers or coaxial speakers, just one single speaker driver with a sensitivity of at least 85db SPL. Most of them can be built as a DIY project, but those single-driver speakers are mostly for professional sound environment settings like recording or live venues.
 

Kenneth Fernandes

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Currently, all those speakers still have some sort of crossover including the KEF's.

Also, there aren't any stereo amplifiers (integrated/all-in-one) that have a frequency control I have come across, where you can set the output speaker frequency from ~100Hz, and the same frequency can be set on the sub-woofer low pass frequency control. This would bring a great number of products from various manufacturers in the single-driver bookshelf speakers and audio electronics (amplifiers) market.
 
Currently, all those speakers still have some sort of crossover including the KEF's.

Also, there aren't any stereo amplifiers (integrated/all-in-one) that have a frequency control I have come across, where you can set the output speaker frequency from ~100Hz, and the same frequency can be set on the sub-woofer low pass frequency control. This would bring a great number of products from various manufacturers in the single-driver bookshelf speakers and audio electronics (amplifiers) market.
As I said single driver (full range) drivers are not going to work in a bookshelf sized speaker.
 

Kenneth Fernandes

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As I said single driver (full range) drivers are not going to work in a bookshelf sized speaker.
There is nothing stopping from having a single-driver speaker without any internal circuitry, just a speaker driver connected to output terminals. All of the frequency management could be done at the amplifier end that controls the output frequency to the speaker and a sub-woofer out. Although, I haven't heard any amp could do that.
 
His bookshelves might be Tannoy Westminster size 🙂
But yes, those Rehdeko ones are also big.
...and both of those use dual concentric drivers don't they? - so would still contain the crossover that he doesn't want 😐
Only ones I have seen had Lowther full range transducers and they don't come in small boxes....
And I still don't quite understand what he's trying to achieve or why.
 

Vincent Kars

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The problem with full range drivers is that they are not full range. I do think calling them wide banders is more apt as they don't go low (can indeed be compensated by a sub) nor high as the treble is often rolled of at 18 kHz. This can be compensated by getting older.

The closest we can get is a 2.1 where the bass is handled by a woofer, the mid range by the woofers of the satellites and the treble by the tweeters.

Of course there are full range systems claiming 40 - 20.000 Hz (without specifying the tolerance) like https://voxativ.berlin/ampeggio-2023. With 40x120x40cm not exactly bookshelf but at only $13,900.00 it is yours.
 
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Kenneth Fernandes

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Single-driver speakers, I mean a single material drive unit too. Similar to the drive units of an over-ear headphone like the Sennheiser HD 560S and others in the line-up, but with a bigger size and specification that cater to a living room. (~120Hz and above)
For the low frequencies, they could be paired with a sub-woofer.
The ones mentioned above have two different materials in the construction of the speaker unit, a metal insert in the centre of the driver and a different cone material.
 
pearlacoustics.com these guys seem to fit the bill if I havent missunderstood
Yes, and they are the only design I’ve seen and heard more than twice, so they are doing something right. But they are still more costly than excellent three-way floorstanders, so remain a niche choice.

Generally, it’s a nice idea, but very hard to implement. Hence, never really made commercial sense.

 

twinkletoes

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Yes, and they are the only design I’ve seen and heard more than twice, so they are doing something right. But they are still more costly than excellent three-way floorstanders, so remain a niche choice.

Generally, it’s a nice idea, but very hard to implement. Hence, never really made commercial sense.

they look to be very nice speakers TBH and nicely made.
 
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Kenneth Fernandes

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I'm not sure that anyone else understands why, though.
I have created another post that explains in more detail.
 

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