Question Way too boomy

Fahad

Active member
Jan 30, 2020
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So, I recently changed my dyaudio emit 20 for a pair of qacoustics 3050i. While i am enjoying the music a lot more, for a few specific songs (certain parts of the songs) the echoing bass tends to linger around the room longer than necessary, a problem i did not have with bookshelves. ( californication by red hot chilli peppers is a prime example)

i saw people using rubber pads underneath the speaker spikes to make them less boomy. So got a few rubber pads from the heard ware store. That just made a lit bit better, but far from what i was hoping to achieve. I did try the foams for the bass port. It didnt do much and i thought it was kinda hurting the openness of the sound any ways.

my room is 14X 20 ft. Any suggestions guys?
 

ast2312

Active member
May 3, 2020
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Hi, I sympathise as I have experienced similar issues when I had some PMC’s. I tried various different upgrades with my Naim kit at the time but I think it came down to room acoustics and shape of the room.

It maybe worth trying to speak to someone who has experience in room correction just as a thought. Maybe some tips from an expert could avoid unnessary spend (wish I had done that).

I also notice that the typical demo rooms have plenty of soft furnishings to help avoid reflections. Obviously not knowing how your room is constructed and furnished, maybe a look at seeing what you can do to help make it room acoustic friendly. The typical demo room that I have experienced have plenty of soft furnishings to avoid reflections.

Hope this helps.
 
You’d be right about the foam bungs. While they do what they’re supposed to do, they do usually rob a speaker of the life and energy it was designed to have. Usually best avoided unless a Last resort is required.

If the issues are being caused by your room, there’s not too much you can do about them other than look into room treatment, it you’ll need to seek out someone who specialises in this to work out where the issue lies.

Being that the 3050i are a relatively budget loudspeaker, it could just be inherent in the design, and again, there’s not too much you can do about this. You can use s9ething like ISOacoustics GAIA isolation feet to remove vibrations making their way back into the speaker, but this isn’t a cheap option. You could try a couple of Auralex isolation which I use under my speakers which seems to do the trick pretty well, and it’s not crazy expensive.

Other than that, it’s looking for a pair of floorstanders that work better in your room, or working out whether standmounts might be a better option if they work better.
 

Fahad

Active member
Jan 30, 2020
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Hi, thanks for the suggestions guys. Think for an expert on room treatment, need to ride out the current lockdowns and wait till ww let people inside the house.
For Auralex isolation, i have seen them used under subs, so they stay on the floor and the speaker spikes rest on top of them of do you remove the spikes?
 

12th Monkey

Well-known member
Aug 31, 2015
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Bungs do seem to sap life and energy. Have you experimented with speaker positioning and distance from walls? It's an obvious suggestion, but you haven't mentioned it.
 

Fahad

Active member
Jan 30, 2020
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Bungs do seem to sap life and energy. Have you experimented with speaker positioning and distance from walls? It's an obvious suggestion, but you haven't mentioned it.
To be honest, have not. Mainly because the room is so small they will be a nuisance if i move them somewhere else. Tried to take them away from the wall as much as possible.

but u are right, maybe should do it this evening to see what i am working with.
 

Al ears

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Nov 23, 2008
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Hi, thanks for the suggestions guys. Think for an expert on room treatment, need to ride out the current lockdowns and wait till ww let people inside the house.
For Auralex isolation, i have seen them used under subs, so they stay on the floor and the speaker spikes rest on top of them of do you remove the spikes?
Remove the spikes.
 

jonathanRD

Well-known member
Jan 27, 2011
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To be honest, have not. Mainly because the room is so small they will be a nuisance if i move them somewhere else. Tried to take them away from the wall as much as possible.

but u are right, maybe should do it this evening to see what i am working with.
Did you demo them in your room before your purchased them? I know that might not help you now, but it's an important consideration when purchasing speakers for a smaller room. The 3050i are rear ported speakers, so how close they are to the back wall will be a factor. Front ported may have worked better, but in any case try to experiment with positioning. Otherwise some form of digital sound equalisation and room treatment will be in order, but that's a whole different proposition altogether! :)
 

ast2312

Active member
May 3, 2020
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Hi Fahd, just one final though and maybe not ideal for audiophiles, have you got any means to introduce and EQ adjustment (also mentioned above). I switched from Naim to Devialet when I had the issues and was able to control the bass response. Like I said, it’s not ideal and something I don’t do on my much much lesser system that I have today but it did make an improvement.
 

Al ears

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Nov 23, 2008
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Hi Fahd, just one final though and maybe not ideal for audiophiles, have you got any means to introduce and EQ adjustment (also mentioned above). I switched from Naim to Devialet when I had the issues and was able to control the bass response. Like I said, it’s not ideal and something I don’t do on my much much lesser system that I have today but it did make an improvement.
The Parasound 2100 does have tone and balance controls.....
 

Fahad

Active member
Jan 30, 2020
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Hi Fahd, just one final though and maybe not ideal for audiophiles, have you got any means to introduce and EQ adjustment (also mentioned above). I switched from Naim to Devialet when I had the issues and was able to control the bass response. Like I said, it’s not ideal and something I don’t do on my much much lesser system that I have today but it did make an improvement.
Hey, yeah my pre amp does have a bass control, does make it better, but then again, the problem is with some specific songs. Its not like all the songs are boomy.

but yeah, it does work. But was hoping for a solution that wont take much away From the original recording
 

Fahad

Active member
Jan 30, 2020
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Room treatment , bass traps / diffusers at least 50% of the sound is not from your speakers but from the room
don't know where to get started. I was reading somewhere that bass traps in all eight corners of the room. Then again, worried about spending quite a bit of money, damaging the walls and get little result cause I am no expert. Also I have the door in one corner of the room.

maybe wait for the end of the lockdown to get a view from an expert.
 

12th Monkey

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Aug 31, 2015
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Room treatment , bass traps / diffusers at least 50% of the sound is not from your speakers but from the room
That interests me as a statement, and I confess some scepticism. If it were true, most hifi setups would sound bad in most rooms - which isn't my experience. I can see a 'poor' room having a bigger effect at high volumes, but not an average room being responsible for 50% of what you actually hear.

I can easily see how there are poor listening spots in most rooms though, again taking volume into account. My listening room is broadly square and if you stand in the middle and listen to something bassy, standing waves clearly occur and it sounds overblown. But from my listening position that effect is entirely absent.
 
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MUSICRAFT

Well-known member
at least 50% of the sound is not from your speakers but from the room
According Peter Lyngdorf 85% of the sound we hear comes from the room and 15% from the loudspeakers.

Although something is better than nothing with passive room treatments however in my experience and if possible the most appropiate solution to tackle acoustical errors of the room is to use effective digital room correction.

"one of the things that people don't realise is that if they buy the best speakers in the world and put it in a normal living room about 85% of the sound they hear is coming from the room"

"speakers are 15% of the sound and the room is 85% and those 85% typically are not so good"

"when you can digitally compensate in the correct way, we can actually make sure if you buy Bowers & Wilkins speakers or Dali speakers or really good loudspeakers it will sound the best that that speaker can sound in your own room and that is what really matters"

View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oKwW5BT32rs
 

DougK

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Dec 8, 2013
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According Peter Lyngdorf 85% of the sound we hear comes from the room and 15% from the loudspeakers.

Although something is better than nothing with passive room treatments however in my experience and if possible the most appropiate solution to tackle acoustical errors of the room is to use effective digital room correction.

"one of the things that people don't realise is that if they buy the best speakers in the world and put it in a normal living room about 85% of the sound they hear is coming from the room"

"speakers are 15% of the sound and the room is 85% and those 85% typically are not so good"

"when you can digitally compensate in the correct way, we can actually make sure if you buy Bowers & Wilkins speakers or Dali speakers or really good loudspeakers it will sound the best that that speaker can sound in your own room and that is what really matters"

View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oKwW5BT32rs
Yeah but wouldn't Mr Lyngdorf say this anyway, he's a salesman and wants to sell his products.
 
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Al ears

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Nov 23, 2008
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According Peter Lyngdorf 85% of the sound we hear comes from the room and 15% from the loudspeakers.

Although something is better than nothing with passive room treatments however in my experience and if possible the most appropiate solution to tackle acoustical errors of the room is to use effective digital room correction.

"one of the things that people don't realise is that if they buy the best speakers in the world and put it in a normal living room about 85% of the sound they hear is coming from the room"

"speakers are 15% of the sound and the room is 85% and those 85% typically are not so good"

"when you can digitally compensate in the correct way, we can actually make sure if you buy Bowers & Wilkins speakers or Dali speakers or really good loudspeakers it will sound the best that that speaker can sound in your own room and that is what really matters"

View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oKwW5BT32rs
I would question his assertions considering he is actively trying to promote his own equipment.
Whatever the size of room, and before all the electronic trickery employed today in order to sell a product, people have been able to find set-ups that were perfectly adequate for their needs without moving house or spending a fortune.
The main issue appears to be people buying equipment that they have never heard within the room they're going to be listening to it in and then immediately think of upgrading it to something else they have never heard in the same situation.
No amount of fudging or 'room correction' is going to make a silk purse out of a sows ear, as the saying goes.
Digitally compensating is what done at the production stage anything you do afterwards is fudging.
Nobody wants to /cannot listen to music as it was intended to be heard as their expectations are not exactly what their room / equipment is going to deliver.
Your always going to get to a point that is 'acceptable' and that's pretty much it, considering your own hearing capabilities
 

millennia_one

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Sep 1, 2014
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There was another chap on here with similar problems. Basically the speakers need to be moved to there min distance from the wall or the seating poistion needs to be moved slightly. Try all the free things first before you start pouring money into the system.

For example pinch some cushions and place them behind the speakers and see if that helps. Hang some old sheets, towels up for a few tracks and see if that makes a difference. place some house plants in the room and so on. then you can buy better looking products
 

MUSICRAFT

Well-known member
a salesman and wants to sell his products.
Sorry but I am going to differ because this could be said of any manufacturer and their products.

I even get questioned and criticized for not only using but also recommending basic 79 strand speaker cables, ‘freebie’ interconnects and highlighting and recommending discontinued or used products. Go figure.
 

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