Cleaning vinyl with compressed air

spl84

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Jul 17, 2023
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This is a topic that I don't think I've seen discussed often. Alot of record cleaning machines come with a vac to suck up liquid and/or particles on the record surface. It's seems like a good method of cleaning loose particles. The only issues I can think of would be removing films of oil/contaminants, etc. If the record left the factory with some film from the pressing process, which many are said to have, then you would need some more aggressive cleaning such as ultrasonic. The only other problem would be the fact that the particles are blown into the air and can fall back down onto surfaces. I have been using a computer duster for quick cleaning of dust but it's not perfect if you have a static cling because the particles stick like glue. Anyone else use compressed air?
 

twinkletoes

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This is a topic that I don't think I've seen discussed often. Alot of record cleaning machines come with a vac to suck up liquid and/or particles on the record surface. It's seems like a good method of cleaning loose particles. The only issues I can think of would be removing films of oil/contaminants, etc. If the record left the factory with some film from the pressing process, which many are said to have, then you would need some more aggressive cleaning such as ultrasonic. The only other problem would be the fact that the particles are blown into the air and can fall back down onto surfaces. I have been using a computer duster for quick cleaning of dust but it's not perfect if you have a static cling because the particles stick like glue. Anyone else use compressed air?

They're many ways to clean records and range from the absurd - things that do absolutely nothing


Compressed air id seeing as a good idea in practice and wouldn't put any undue wear on the records from friction based care but only from a compressor never form a can, the cans get incredibly cold and if used to close can start to freeze things. My fingers can attest to that from past uses. they can also spit leading to other undesirable chemicals landing on the record.

If your using a compressor keep an eye on how you use it even at relatively low pressures of 5psi can cause serious injury, and with breaks in skin you can send air in to the blood stream though rare can and does happen , not a pleasant experience seen it happen. Use at your own risk.

TBH after an initial wet clean and if handled and stored correctly I dont touch them with even a brush. I just keep the stylus clean. After all there plastic and this time of year static build up is the biggest problem and the only way to get rid of that fully is purified water.
 
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PAPA BOO

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My best luck over the many years of collecting and restoring vintage vinyl is label saver clamps and a good soaking and using a good natural fiber brush to get in the grooves.
My preferred brush is a mink make up brush taped at the base real tight and cut down to less then a 1/4 inch. If the record looks real bad I play it with one of my older needles and get the grim out before playing with my good listening needle.
 

spl84

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Jul 17, 2023
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They're many ways to clean records and range from the absurd - things that do absolutely nothing


Compressed air id seeing as a good idea in practice and wouldn't put any undue wear on the records from friction based care but only from a compressor never form a can, the cans get incredibly cold and if used to close can start to freeze things. My fingers can attest to that from past uses. they can also spit leading to other undesirable chemicals landing on the record.

If your using a compressor keep an eye on how you use it even at relatively low pressures of 5psi can cause serious injury, and with breaks in skin you can send air in to the blood stream though rare can and does happen , not a pleasant experience seen it happen. Use at your own risk.

TBH after an initial wet clean and if handled and stored correctly I dont touch them with even a brush. I just keep the stylus clean. After all there plastic and this time of year static build up is the biggest problem and the only way to get rid of that fully is purified water.
Yeah I've ran into that issue also. If you tilt the can too much you will spew propellant onto the record surface and that's definitely not good. I'm not exactly sure what's in that stuff but I'm pretty sure it's not good for vinyl...:oops:
 

twinkletoes

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Yeah I've ran into that issue also. If you tilt the can too much you will spew propellant onto the record surface and that's definitely not good. I'm not exactly sure what's in that stuff but I'm pretty sure it's not good for vinyl...:oops:
it's the same stuff they use air con systems and contains a good many chemicals , it contains a lot of thane's and tane's. if you where to burn/ expose these chemicals to heat these fluorocarbons tend to produce Hdyfrofluoric aicid and other nasty things, So id even say using them blow on hot electronics should be avoided. Its certainly a strange product to sell generally, considering its chemical makeup and intended use.

Weather those chemicals are safe for vinyl who knows. My guess would be no

Id follow @PAPA BOO advice or use a spin clean.
 
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