Comparison of record cleaning machines

thescarletpronster

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Nov 17, 2012
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I thought it would be useful to have a thread which collated comments and reviews about different record cleaning machines, particularly comparing them in relation to performance versus price. If we can build up a picture of how these machines compare to each other, it would help people to decide whether it's worth investing in a more expensive model or sticking with a cheaper one, and so on.

The ones that come to mind (and which are available in UK) are:

Unpowered brush cleaners:
Knosti Disco Anti-stat1st gen £45; 2nd gen £60
Spin Clean Record Washer – £70

Powered vacuum cleaners:
Pro-Ject VC-S – £300
Okki Nokki – £400
Moth Mk 2 – £500 (£335 in kit form)
VPI HW 16.5 – £650
Clearaudio Smart Matrix – £800
SOTA – £800
Loricraft PRC3 Mk 4 – £1300
Keith Monks discoveryOne – £1700
Keith Monks RCM Mk II – £3000
Klaudio Ultrasonic Cleaner – £4000

Let me know if I've missed any machines that should be included. And let me know your experience of the different machines, and I'll try to compile the reviews in this post.
 

MajorFubar

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Mar 3, 2010
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You've also missed the Pro-Ject VCS, which quite possibly is the cheapest vacuum record cleaner available. I'm seriously considering it myself, if only I could find the room for it.
 
K

keeper of the quays

Guest
The machine is the human arm! Powerforce eraser sponge. Distilled water! Cost? A couple of quid! Better than all these ridiculous machines mentioned above...a fool and his money are soon parted! All you need with eraser sponge and distilled water is elbow grease! So you lazy fools? Wise up!!!
 

Waxy

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May 15, 2014
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keeper of the quays said:
The machine is the human arm! Powerforce eraser sponge. Distilled water! Cost? A couple of quid! Better than all these ridiculous machines mentioned above...a fool and his money are soon parted! All you need with eraser sponge and distilled water is elbow grease! So you lazy fools? Wise up!!!
Go away.
 

ifor

Well-known member
Dec 3, 2002
104
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keeper of the quays said:
The machine is the human arm! Powerforce eraser sponge. Distilled water! Cost? A couple of quid! Better than all these ridiculous machines mentioned above...a fool and his money are soon parted! All you need with eraser sponge and distilled water is elbow grease! So you lazy fools? Wise up!!!
The Warning Label
Melamine foam erasers work well; but on surfaces that are painted, polished or easily scratched, they might work a little too well. It's recommended to test the eraser on a small, preferably unnoticeable, portion of whatever you're looking to clean before you dive on in.
 
K

keeper of the quays

Guest
ifor said:
keeper of the quays said:
The machine is the human arm! Powerforce eraser sponge. Distilled water! Cost? A couple of quid! Better than all these ridiculous machines mentioned above...a fool and his money are soon parted! All you need with eraser sponge and distilled water is elbow grease! So you lazy fools? Wise up!!!
 

The Warning Label

Melamine foam erasers work well; but on surfaces that are painted, polished or easily scratched, they might work a little too well. It's recommended to test the eraser on a small, preferably unnoticeable, portion of whatever you're looking to clean before you dive on in.
if you paint records? Who does that? Lol..if you wash your car with a sponge? Does it scratch car? No..drop sponge on ground? Picks up grit! It then scratches car! Don't clean your records outside..using machines and chemical to clean records is absurd..and a thread extolling the virtues of such machines! Is frankly bewildering to any sensible human being.
 

ifor

Well-known member
Dec 3, 2002
104
9
18,595
keeper of the quays said:
ifor said:
keeper of the quays said:
The machine is the human arm! Powerforce eraser sponge. Distilled water! Cost? A couple of quid! Better than all these ridiculous machines mentioned above...a fool and his money are soon parted! All you need with eraser sponge and distilled water is elbow grease! So you lazy fools? Wise up!!!
The Warning Label

Melamine foam erasers work well; but on surfaces that are painted, polished or easily scratched, they might work a little too well. It's recommended to test the eraser on a small, preferably unnoticeable, portion of whatever you're looking to clean before you dive on in.
if you paint records? Who does that? Lol..if you wash your car with a sponge? Does it scratch car? No..drop sponge on ground? Picks up grit! It then scratches car! Don't clean your records outside..using machines and chemical to clean records is absurd..and a thread extolling the virtues of such machines! Is frankly bewildering to any sensible human being.
"In the early 21st century it was discovered that melamine foam is an effective abrasive cleaner.[2] The open-cell foam is microporous and its polymeric substance is very hard, so that when used for cleaning it works like extremely fine sandpaper, getting into tiny grooves and pits in the object being cleaned."

This stuff has two uses in HiFi and neither are cleaning records. 1) sound insulation, and 2) cleaning a stylus.
 
K

keeper of the quays

Guest
ifor said:
keeper of the quays said:
ifor said:
keeper of the quays said:
The machine is the human arm! Powerforce eraser sponge. Distilled water! Cost? A couple of quid! Better than all these ridiculous machines mentioned above...a fool and his money are soon parted! All you need with eraser sponge and distilled water is elbow grease! So you lazy fools? Wise up!!!
The Warning Label

Melamine foam erasers work well; but on surfaces that are painted, polished or easily scratched, they might work a little too well. It's recommended to test the eraser on a small, preferably unnoticeable, portion of whatever you're looking to clean before you dive on in.
if you paint records? Who does that? Lol..if you wash your car with a sponge? Does it scratch car? No..drop sponge on ground? Picks up grit! It then scratches car! Don't clean your records outside..using machines and chemical to clean records is absurd..and a thread extolling the virtues of such machines! Is frankly bewildering to any sensible human being.
"In the early 21st century it was discovered that melamine foam is an effective abrasive cleaner.[2] The open-cell foam is microporous and its polymeric substance is very hard, so that when used for cleaning it works like extremely fine sandpaper, getting into tiny grooves and pits in the object being cleaned."

This stuff has two uses in HiFi and neither are cleaning records. 1) sound insulation, and 2) cleaning a stylus.
Have you tried it? Your the typical Google fool..believe everything google tells you..or should i say..you believe the answers that fit your mindset!!!! Vinyl is tough stuff..scratches are caused by carelessness using the cartridge..cart being very hard..usually diamond! Perhaps you could try the eraser sponge first before you trawl through google trying to justify your weak argument..if i appear rude? I apologise...but as usual I'm 100% correct on this.
 

marb67

Well-known member
Jul 30, 2015
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10,525
The foam worked for me with distilled and some white wine vinegar in most cases but the odd record still has some crackle that could be bought out with brushes on perhaps the disco cleaner. Got rid of the mould 100% though.

i just bought 2 second hand records that look clean as a whistle. When I play them they are pretty noisy which I don't understand unless they are made on bad vinyl. One is 1976 and the other is 1979.
 
K

keeper of the quays

Guest
marb67 said:
The foam worked for me with distilled and some white wine vinegar in most cases but the odd record still has some crackle that could be bought out with brushes on perhaps the disco cleaner. Got rid of the mould 100% though.

i just bought 2 second hand records that look clean as a whistle. When I play them they are pretty noisy which I don't understand unless they are made on bad vinyl. One is 1976 and the other is 1979. 
cart damage...someone played them with a chipped stylus at some point! Nothing can be done..sorry..
 

marb67

Well-known member
Jul 30, 2015
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2
10,525
I will give them a clean nevertheless just in case. I suppose it makes buying second hand vinyl a 100% gamble if there is no way of telling. These records were both bought at different stores.
 

thescarletpronster

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Nov 17, 2012
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To the person who didn't notice, this thread is about record cleaning machines, not about manual methods. That discussion belongs to another thread (and has taken place many times). Please, everyone, don't feed that discussion here or this will quickly get derailed.

Thanks for reminding me about the new Pro-ject, which I intended to include but forgot. I wasn't sure if the others mentioned are readily available in the UK, so didn't include them, but will do so now. Thanks. There's also the Nitty Gritty - is that readily available here, and should that be included?
 
K

keeper of the quays

Guest
thescarletpronster said:
To the person who didn't notice, this thread is about record cleaning machines, not about manual methods. That discussion belongs to another thread (and has taken place many times). Please, everyone, don't feed that discussion here or this will quickly get derailed.

Thanks for reminding me about the new Pro-ject, which I intended to include but forgot. I wasn't sure if the others mentioned are readily available in the UK, so didn't include them, but will do so now. Thanks. There's also the Nitty Gritty - is that readily available here, and should that be included?
With respect I did say elbow grease was the machine! Duh! However I'll leave you lot to your foolishness...to any newbie reading this thread..these people comparing cleaning machines that cost hundreds of pounds! Yet have cheap turntables? Go figure! They are a rare breed..thank god!
 

marb67

Well-known member
Jul 30, 2015
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I must admit the Pro-ject looks a very tempting offer at that price, even for someone with a modest collection like me. I will be always buying vinyl so seems a good investment as it will save so much time.
 

marb67

Well-known member
Jul 30, 2015
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10,525
Well having just taken delivery of the Project record cleaning machine I am so far not impressed. The vacuum does not suck up the residue like shown in the youtube videos even though the arm is perfectly over the LP when engaging. Even longer bursts of the vacuum do not pull the liquid. I thought one of the records had eventually dried until I tested it on my turntable. The suction is just not good enough. Suffice to say it was still wet as well as my new £130 stylus. Quickly cleaned it on a magic eraser so I hope no lasting damage. Shame as I was really looking forward to a bit cleaning session of all my old vinyl.

I think it will be going back to the shop. No way worth the £300 I paid but to be fair I could have got a duff model .
 

The_Lhc

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Oct 16, 2008
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I thought you could adjust the height of the suction arm? There was something in the manual that mentioned moving the arm.
 
K

keeper of the quays

Guest
My eraser sponge cost £1 it has eight sponges in box...should last at least six months...im sorry. But even as i am a humble man..humility is my watchword! I'm feeling rather smug! Later I'll feel bad for feeling smug but right now? I'm Mr smug man...
 

marb67

Well-known member
Jul 30, 2015
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Al ears said:
M
The_Lhc said:
I thought you could adjust the height of the suction arm? There was something in the manual that mentioned moving the arm.
Agreed the arm height is crucial, it must be adjustable. If it isn't then lack of suction is not surprising. Take it back.
well the velcro is touchig the record so it can't be any closer. Another thing is the records seems to slope slightly away from the end of the arm creating a small gap. The record isn't warped and sits level on the platter.
 

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