Cleaning options

Nathan

New member
Jun 23, 2016
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I've been reading the New Vinyls and noise issues thread with interest and a question arises.

What do people seem to think the best method of cleaning vinyl is? I've seen a bunch of options from and cloth or air gun to a spinning bath-type affair like the disco antistatic. What would people suggest and how often would you suggest doing it?
 

Al ears

Well-known member
Nathan said:
I've been reading the New Vinyls and noise issues thread with interest and a question arises.

What do people seem to think the best method of cleaning vinyl is? I've seen a bunch of options from and cloth or air gun to a spinning bath-type affair like the disco antistatic. What would people suggest and how often would you suggest doing it?

One of the cheapest effective options is the Knosti Disco Antistat as you mentioned. I use one on all newly acquired vinyl and then use a carbon fibre brush after that. If properly stored you shouldn't need to clean with any great frequency as the stylus does that.
 

AntAxon

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Jan 9, 2015
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I totally agree with Al Ears, I recently acquired one and spent a few days cleaning all my records. I was astounded as to the improvement it made to my 1970s records which were almost unplayable before cleaning. It also improved all my recent purchases. I too use a carbon brush. After cleaning I replaced the record sleeves with polylined sleeves from Cover33.
 

Nathan

New member
Jun 23, 2016
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Aside from the £20 difference, is there any actual differnece between the Gen 1 and Gen 2 versions of the Knosti? Happy to spend money, but not to waste it!
 

AntAxon

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Jan 9, 2015
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The generation 2 version has a handle to rotate the record. The only other difference I'm told is that the brushes on the generation 1 have a metalic fixing holding the bristles in place which can deteriorate if stored when wet. I was advised to dry the bath unit in the airing cupboard before packing away.

I don't think the generation 2 is worth the extra money.

Others on this site recommend making your own cleaning fluid.

90% Distilled Water, 10% Isopropyl Alcohol (IPA) and 3 drops of IIfotol per litre
 
D

Deleted member 108165

Guest
Gen 2 also has seals on the disc clamp which are supposed to keep the label dry... they don't work very well as the outer ring of the label still gets wet where it makes contact with the seals. Personally I think the extra for the Gen 2 is worth it, but it doesn't stop me looking at the Pro-ject VCS and wondering if this not a better solution all round *smile*

I use the home-brew fluid as detailed by AntAxon.
 

Nathan

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Jun 23, 2016
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Ooo. Doug, you are officially on my **** list. That looks cool and my inner magpie is struggling with the buy it now button on Amazon Prime
angry_smile.gif
 
Feb 21, 2015
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Hi Doug,

I recently purchased a Pro-Ject VCS and I'm extremely happy with it.
It's not a miracle device, but it does improve the sound of older records by quite a large margin. Records that previously were close to unlistenable, are now, apart from the occasional pop and crack, actually enjoyable. *dance4*

But it does have some flaws.
They provided a brush to apply the cleaning fluid... My advice: throw it away immediatly. The vacuum cleaner has more work sucking op the hairs from the brush than the fluid and dirt on the record. I use the Mobile Fidelity to apply the fluid and it works much better.
And it's noisy, very noisy...

But all in all, it was a worthy investment IMHO, since I do buy a lot of second hand vinyl,
 
D

Deleted member 108165

Guest
Cheers Christophe, much appreciated sir *good*
 

camcroft

Well-known member
Jan 12, 2012
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Hi. Guys This is not a joke. I have had some of my vinyl for more than Twenty years plus there was a long period that I never used my turntable which at the time was a Thorens TD147 which bye the way is in the loft gathering dust with its MP11 catridge attached. A few years ago I decided to listen to the Project Carbon turntable which I now think knocks the socks off the Thorens and is not prone to the set up issues of a suspended turntable I replaced the platter with the Acrylic one. Now getting back to the cleaning of my records I bought some LCD screen cleaner from Poundland and it worked a treat on the screen so I thought well let me try it on one of my old Lps well what a transformation there was it comes with Two Microfibre cloths I place the Lp on a towel and proceed to spray the whole playing area and because its not Alcohol based I dont worry so much about it getting onto the centre bit I then clean in the direction of the grooves once and then take the other clean cloth and repeat the process. Its cheap and I have never had any problems and I use it on brand new albums with the same result I have a sort of immitation Dust Bug and I spray the brush part before playing an album and the cleaner leaves no residue behind. You might think me crazy but it works for me thanks Poundland
 

Al ears

Well-known member
DougK said:
Cheers Christophe, much appreciated sir *good*

One thing that record cleaning machines are is noisy. Don't know of one that isn't. From the Keith Monks to all others they have this in common. However, it's all down to how well they actually work.
 

6and8

Well-known member
Jan 20, 2014
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Popped into a right Aladdin's cave of a shop today. Old vinyl, laser discs, VHS, film reels - there was stuff piled up everywhere. Anyway, the owner and I got talking analogue vs digital (he was an analogue man) and he says he cleans his old vinyl using wood glue.

He smears it across the surface of the record and leaves it to dry. Then he peels off the sheet of dried glue which (he says) lifts off any dirt, grease, dust, grit, you name it.

He reckons his records sound brilliant after a good gluing.
 

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