Wharfedale Evo 4.2 - A Story Of Love & Heartbreak (Powered by Cambridge Audio CXA 81)

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AJM1981

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Agreed. I actually have mine with two subs (with room correction) and it’s perfect for me. I actually don’t find the treble ‘softened’ just not harsh….as so many speakers are! I can listen to baroque violin for example without my ears bleeding……😁
That is perhaps a better description. :)

I just like that little extra touch in the upper region to kind of extra freshen the ride cymbals a bit for the lower volumes. But it is subtle, not a leap.

I have been interested in the Wharfedale Elysian in standmount format, though not in a way to actually get them someday due to their size. I think the 4.2s are fairly easy to move around and versatile in output, probably my last set of speakers ever for the living. As I think by this point and in this form factor about everything that could be in it, is in it.
 
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Tinman1952

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That is perhaps a better description. :)

I just like that little extra touch in the upper region to kind of extra freshen the ride cymbals a bit for the lower volumes. But it is subtle, not a leap.

I have been interested in the Wharfedale Elysian in standmount format, though not in a way to actually get them someday due to their size. I think the 4.2s are fairly easy to move around and versatile in output, probably my last set of speakers ever for the living. As I think by this point and in this form factor about everything that could be in it, is in it.
Yeah the Elysian 2 are nice…if I ever win the lottery! 😁
I’m very happy with the Evo 4.2. The problem for me was getting the right stands. HiFi racks Duo were too high and too wobbly…I needed 44cm stands 🤔 In the end I bought the Wharfedale Linton stands…the correct height and rock solid! 👍
 
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AJM1981

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Yeah the Elysian 2 are nice…if I ever win the lottery! 😁
I’m very happy with the Evo 4.2. The problem for me was getting the right stands. HiFi racks Duo were too high and too wobbly…I needed 44cm stands 🤔 In the end I bought the Wharfedale Linton stands…the correct height and rock solid! 👍
Excellent

I have the Norstone Alva stands. More a style choice than stability thing, altough they are fine. They are quite uniform with my oak model of the 4.2s and blend well in with the piece of TV furniture which is also black and oak.

It kind of surprised me that there is probably just enough, but relatively speaking not that much choice in stands.
 
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CheshirePete

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There are a few important things

-These are 3 way standmounts
- They provide monitor quality hi-res audio
-They have headroom

I have to admit that the Evo 4.2s are a bit tamed down and signature speakers for 70s to 90s music, Jazz and about everything accoustic. Bass that lifts without being boomy and treble it is a bit softened. That is out of the box.

But given the format and the big amounts of headroom these speakers provide having the AMT tweeter and the solid domed midrange and the high resolutionm You can basically kraft any possible sound signature out of it with DSP without any effort and "emulate" other preferred speakers to what is reachable for a cabinet this format.

I personally like it with a sub for the little extra reach and support and a slight increase of treble to untame the tweeter a little without it becoming too bright. But you can go to greater lengths as these can be quite a chameleon.
Interesting to hear what you are doing with DSP, I have these speakers and have just bought a NAD C 658 with Dirac Live.

I have been having a play around with Dirac and am starting to get the sound signature I initially wanted.

I always wanted a large bookshelf speaker and can't really afford a pair of Harbeth's, so I am hoping these are going to fit the bill .... just need to learn more about Dirac live.
 
Interesting to hear what you are doing with DSP, I have these speakers and have just bought a NAD C 658 with Dirac Live.

I have been having a play around with Dirac and am starting to get the sound signature I initially wanted.

I always wanted a large bookshelf speaker and can't really afford a pair of Harbeth's, so I am hoping these are going to fit the bill .... just need to learn more about Dirac live.
If you need that sort of room correction you have the wrong speakers in my opinion
 

AJM1981

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If you need that sort of room correction you have the wrong speakers in my opinion
I didnt write anything related to room correction, more about preference correction. In which I think reference in club speakers are a little difficult to reproduce for allround speakers. 'little extra punch' to one songs benefit can result in unwanted steroids for another.

Dsp on its own is great. I've read that especially owners of horn loaded speakers that took a lot of effort to control well in the past benefit hugely from DSP.

Actually I am not doing that much with it myself besides a minor thing like controlling the sub with my phone in some cases and give this tiny push in treble as mentioned but it doesn't make a huge difference. Any modern amp with dsp will give at least an extra general midrange control. Including a sub it makes up for 4 individual speaker units that can be individually controlled.

My message to the starter or this topic is that the Wharfedale Evo 4.2 holds up everything to tailor it around specific genres of music though no single speaker can be A and B or C at the same time. When I crank up my treble and bass and tune down the mids I might transform it into a more than great hiphop and Jungle/ Drum n Bass speaker because producers already tune down the midrange in those genres in general and I can double that effect . But then I want to play classical music and I should bypass everything. I requires too much tinkering around.

That is why I just love allround speakers that are able to transform to other signatures whereas someone with a dedicated speaker (like the JBL wave guided speaker that Whathifi reviewed) has a hard time to reach into anything else instead of Rock and dance music, simply because it is kind of hard wired to do that best. I like those speakers in their own right and they are great when someones playlist is all about a certain genre but they are not the ones I would choose when listening to music in general.
 
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GoodVibes

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There are a few important things

-These are 3 way standmounts
- They provide monitor quality hi-res audio
-They have headroom

I have to admit that the Evo 4.2s are a bit tamed down and signature speakers for 70s to 90s music, Jazz and about everything accoustic. Bass that lifts without being boomy and treble it is a bit softened. That is out of the box.

But given the format and the big amounts of headroom these speakers provide having the AMT tweeter and the solid domed midrange and the high resolutionm You can basically kraft any possible sound signature out of it with DSP without any effort and "emulate" other preferred speakers to what is reachable for a cabinet this format.

I personally like it with a sub for the little extra reach and support and a slight increase of treble to untame the tweeter a little without it becoming too bright. But you can go to greater lengths as these can be quite a chameleon.
Hi, thanks for your reply. I don't know much about DSP but I'm interested in finding out more. I'm also interested in pairing another amp with the 4.2's to see what can be gained. What amplifier do you have?
 

GoodVibes

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Jan 31, 2021
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I didnt write anything related to room correction, more about preference correction. In which I think reference in club speakers are a little difficult to reproduce for allround speakers. 'little extra punch' to one songs benefit can result in unwanted steroids for another.

Dsp on its own is great. I've read that especially owners of horn loaded speakers that took a lot of effort to control well in the past benefit hugely from DSP.

Actually I am not doing that much with it myself besides a minor thing like controlling the sub with my phone in some cases and give this tiny push in treble as mentioned but it doesn't make a huge difference. Any modern amp with dsp will give at least an extra general midrange control. Including a sub it makes up for 4 individual speaker units that can be individually controlled.

My message to the starter or this topic is that the Wharfedale Evo 4.2 holds up everything to tailor it around specific genres of music though no single speaker can be A and B or C at the same time. When I crank up my treble and bass and tune down the mids I might transform it into a more than great hiphop and Jungle/ Drum n Bass speaker because producers already tune down the midrange in those genres in general and I can double that effect . But then I want to play classical music and I should bypass everything. I requires too much tinkering around.

That is why I just love allround speakers that are able to transform to other signatures whereas someone with a dedicated speaker (like the JBL wave guided speaker that Whathifi reviewed) has a hard time to reach into anything else instead of Rock and dance music, simply because it is kind of hard wired to do that best. I like those speakers in their own right and they are great when someones playlist is all about a certain genre but they are not the ones I would choose when listening to music in general.
I now realise that due to my wide ranging tastes in music, I am not going to be able to get a speaker that does a fantastic job for all genres. I think my ideal speaker would have a lot of the traits of the wharfedales but with a bit more energy to them. I guess there would be a trade off somewhere along the line though.
 

AJM1981

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Hi, thanks for your reply. I don't know much about DSP but I'm interested in finding out more. I'm also interested in pairing another amp with the 4.2's to see what can be gained. What amplifier do you have?
I use the Yamaha WXA-50 , which replaced my old Harman Kardon Amp really well.

In case when you are interested in getting a sub to get that extra punch in some styles, The B&W ASW608 is a great full sub in a small form factor. Does its job well for about any reasonable room for just this extra grounding in bass.

I know purists will probably reject the idea of controlling anything besides volume, but it fits to print. I won't say that I exploit the full posibilities of dsp but with a form factor like these 3 ways, you could tame it the way you like instead of what the general owners of that specific speaker like.
 
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AJM1981

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I now realise that due to my wide ranging tastes in music, I am not going to be able to get a speaker that does a fantastic job for all genres. I think my ideal speaker would have a lot of the traits of the wharfedales but with a bit more energy to them. I guess there would be a trade off somewhere along the line though.
True

My old B&Ws 602/s3s were really fantastic with tracks by the likes of e.g. Massive attack. They would get that power in the bass just right. They were great for metal and rock too, but they overall got less right than the wharfedales.

Now I could tailor my wharfedales to perform equally to them, but I would also have to find a way to get rid of around 20 years in resolution improvement.
 
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Burrbrown2496

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Feb 6, 2022
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I just ran across this thread about the wharfdales 40.2. I have the parasound a21
parasound p6 pre amp
latest gen node
smsl su 9 dac
qed xt40 spk cables /xt 40 jumpers
stereovox hdxv/ kimber d60 digital coaxial
2 pr wireworld equinox 8 xlr to amp/ from dac to pre
sometimes 2pr chord clearway xlr
shunyata venom 3 powet cables to all except amp
emotiva line conditioner with audience power cables to
ps audio in wall conditioners/ dedicated 20amp
audience power cord to amp
steal rack with steal points
sand filled 24in b&w sand filled steal stands
room 16.5 feet x 13.5 ft 8 foot ceilings/ carpet flooring
Therefore I may have a different take on the warfdale 40.2. After owning for 6 months their character has changed , they aren’t laidback in my setup unless I use the chord xlr otherwise they are slightly forward 3ft from the front wall with desent depth in the soundstage. Width and air is pretty good too. Before these a had a dance with the kef meta and a could never tame that harshness and too in your face no matter what cable setup I used, and I have plenty of those. Recently I purchased a pair of Klipsch rp 600m just to play with and I haven’t been a fan of horns unless paired with a tube amp. Those 600m’s blossomed in my room like a flower, depth, enormous sound stage, bass to write home about and with emotion that had a 3d affect. This what I wished for the evo’s.
 

AJM1981

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I really have not noticed anything changing in any speaker in my life that isn't caused by external conditions. Sometimes a setting can do something or simply removing things from the room like a rug, piece of furniture or a lot of plants can make a change.

Given that (I assume) everything is the same it is often also related to being slightly bored playing the same music over and over again on one system.
 

AJM1981

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To keep things central

I know this is merely a luxury snobbish dilemma. But.. . What do you consider an upgrade to the Evo 4.2s?

I have been tempted by the Lintons given many reviews, but they are a totally different kind of speaker.

Then there is the flagship Elysian, a direct relative to the "Evo sound". They are quite massive and recently came across an open box Elysian 1 for around 1800 euros in the beautiful Walnut verneer finish. Absolutely art even to look at without any music playing. That is something that counts as well in an interior. Though, the Evo's aren't really that far behind in this.

When hearing demos comparing the Evo 4.2, to the Elysian 2 it seems that mainly the volume of the cabinet among does much in having to work less for the same output with the rest of pricier components delivering a subtle bump in tight sound.

But I wonder if they are worth another 1000 euros (discounted Elysian 1) or even around 2500 euro more (original price). The Evo's on their own seem to be already be a definite choice for the average living.
 
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Edbostan

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I bought these fantastic speakers around 6 months ago. For listening to low-mid tempo music, I give them a solid 9/10. I can’t imagine there are a better pair on the market that look and sound like this for anywhere near the price of £599. However, I have come to realise that there is an ingredient missing that is vital to the enjoyment of certain genres. They sound great with every genre I play on them but their laid back nature leaves them feeling a little boring in comparison to other speakers. If you are considering these speakers and favor genres that are more energetic such as Rock, Dance, D&B, Hip Hop etc I would suggest that you will be able to find a more enjoyable pair of speakers. This is my love story with these wonderful speakers that eventually lead to heartache.
.

Wharfedale Evo 4.2 Characteristics:

- Wide, deep, immersive soundstage, In the right room given the correct positioning, playing the right songs, they create an environment of music that surrounds you and makes for a truly magical listening experience.

- Laid-back, smooth, non fatiguing sound allows for extensive listening sessions.

- Instruments and vocals sound fantastic. Instrument separation is strikingly good.

- Full bodied lower bass.

- Upper bass/lower mids lack dynamics/attack/bite/punch.

- Sound best in medium sized rooms. In a small room they don’t have the space to create the soundscape that makes for a magical experience.
Lacking a little in dynamics, energy and excitement. Not for those who want to get down and boogie.

- Blues, Jazz, Acoustic, Vocals, Dub Reggae, Instruments and low-mid tempo music types are presented fantastically.

- Dance, Rock, Drum & Bass & Hip Hop music sound good but do not play to this speakers strengths.

- They look and feel much more expensive than they are

- They have a small sweet spot which sometimes stopped me from relaxing fully as I was distracted by making sure I was in the perfect position at all times.


A Brief Intro:

I am 6 months into my new found hobbie/obsession of Hifi. The story began when I inherited a pair of Heybrook HB1’s which are approx 15-20 years old. Before I inherited them I had spent many evenings enjoying their sound when connected to a Marantz PM7000. This combo produced a nice cosy ‘warm’ (I’m learning!) and relaxed sound. Unfortunately the amplifier was broke and so the search for a new one began and a new hobby/obession was born. I found myself feeling overwhelmed, dazed and confused as I obsessively spent many hours and many days trying to absorb a wealth of information. So many things to consider, so much lingo to learn, watts, ohms, warm, neutral, cold, DACs, Inputs, Outputs, Preouts, Sub Outs, USB, Bluetooth, Aptx, Digital Coax, Optical and Phono to name but a few. What does it all mean? I was learning to crawl, and as I was crawling along I was picked up and placed upon the Cambridge Audio CXA 81 hype train (CHO CHOOOO!) The USB connectivity and AptX HD Bluetooth connectivity swung the deal.

As soon as i connected the amp to the Heybrooks i noticed a difference in what I remembered to be their sound signature. They were not how I remembered them, they were like a different pair of speakers. The sound is now more awake with an icy brightness that reveals a little more detail but when played with volume can be a bit piercing and over time fatiguing. Although they were not how I remembered them, the sound was still pleasing & I was happy to have brought them back to life. After enjoying the sound for a month or so I couldn’t help but wonder what sound modern speakers would offer when paired with the CXA 81. Once more I dived head first down the rabbit hole...

As I searched through forums and watching Youtube video’s I was drawn towards the usual suspects within my price range of £500-£1000. After extensively watching reviews and reading forums, my attentions were drawn towards the Wharedale Evo range. My choice was reaffirmed when I head Zero Fidelity describe the CXA 81 and 4.2’s pair as "freakishly good”. Tharbamars review of them had me waving my cash card in the air saying 'take my money’! I briefly considered the 4.1’s. Strangely I couldn’t find any youtube reviews but there were a few people on the forums who seemed to prefer the 4.1’s over the 4.2’s. After some consideration, I simply couldn’t resist the great words being used to describe the sound that comes from the 4.2’s dedicated Mid dome. I placed my order via Audio Affair who provided a great service and within 48 hours I was wearing the supplied white gloves as i unpacked and served them to their new stands like a butler.

Straight Out The Box: My first reaction as I undressed them from their protective white gowns was that the walnut appeared duller than it looked in the pictures but that they still look beautiful and seem very well made. Their shape and design look very at home in my living room. The first test that had to pass was the wife test, I was nervous. They are larger and have a more imposing presence than the HB1’s but thankfully she liked them and said they look expensive (phew).

With much talk of a ‘burn in’ process I wasn’t expecting great results from the first song. I opted for a live recording of “Positive Vibration”, its the very first song on Bob Marley’s fantastic live album titled Babylon By Bus. The song begins with cheers, clapping and whistles from the audience. As Bob takes the stage, they cheer and he greets the crowd in the name of "Haile Selassie", as the song begins the crowd go wild. I immediately notice the sound stage is more expansive, the vocals sound a little clearer, a little more true to life, I noticed more detail within the sounds of the audience but as the music kicked in the bass sounded a bit flabby, boomy, too heavy, unrefined and the various elements of the music didn’t seem to merge pleasantly. Despite knowing they could take a number of hours burn in I was concerned these might not be the speakers for me. I put them on a low volume and let them play, 5 hours later I returned and turned them up towards a medium volume. At bed time I returned the volume to low and returned 24 hours after I had switched them on

5 Hours

I did notice an improvement but I started to become concerned buy the bass. The speakers where well positioned away from side walls and rear walls. Too boomy and not allowing me to enjoy the mid dome/ AMT. I allow them to play at the same volume until bedtime when I reduce to lower volume while I sleep.

12-14hrs
Starting to notice an improvement in overall presentation of the music but getting more concerned by the bass. I’m not able to connect the speakers to the great reviews. Have I bought snake oil? I wonder

24 Hours play time -

What a difference a day makes, 24 golden hours. The bass is less boomy, in fact its not boomy at all! Its full-bodied and is working in harmony with the mids and trebles. These speakers are beginning to sound very good indeed. I began to experience what ‘separation’ of instruments was, and I like it.

One week later -

I sit down for an evening accompanied by a selection of my favourite beverages and what a night it was. I really enjoyed the way the songs were reproduced. I had been speaking to a chap in one forum who told me the CXA & 4.2 combo leaves him with a stupid grin on his face. As the beer flowed I was enjoying going though various genres but that 'stupid grin' moment had yet to happen. It arrived unexpectedly with help from The Fugees. In my quest to test how 90’s Hip Hop sounded I reached for their brilliant album - The Score, one of my favourites. As the album played out, I thought once again it sounded well presented. Highs all there, most definitely non fatiguing, just about right, vocals all coming through nice and clearly along with instrument and other sounds from that frequency range. It was all very decent and enjoyable but then out of nowhere I took a hit straight to the sweet spot! KILLING ME SOFTLY came out of the speakers with such grace, beauty, strength and delicateness that I found myself in a church with Lauryn Hill as she powerfully and meaningfully opened her soul to me. I closed my eyes, my body dissolved and had I think what I would describe as a 3D sound experience, it was magical. 3/4 of the way into the song I realised it had happened, I had a stupid grin on my face. I played the song once more from the beginning but with more volume. I poured another beer and raised the glass to my stupidly grinned forum friend. Luckily for me, that grin had only just begun to get stupid and I was about to have listening experience that i’ve never had before.


Benda Bilili- Apojunkwetu

Songs on this album (Tre Fort Fort) are beautifully captured recordings of a band who were not always able to record their music in a studio. ‘Apojunkwetu' is one of those songs, it was recorded on the streets of Africa and features a backdrop of sounds ranging from insect noises and people conversing in what sounds like a restaurant as the waiter collects and even drops things. It is a phenomenal recording and incredibly reproduced by this combination of CXA 81 and 4.2. The vocals and instruments come across with such clarity and a really striking separation. One singer is coming from the left speaker, backing singer on the right, instruments coming through with great separation. The insect noises and other background noises create a soundscape that fills the room and envelops you. One of the band members Roger, a child prodigy who plays an instrument he made himself out of an empty fish can, called a ‘Satonge’. The sound it makes comes through the speakers brilliantly. This is the taste of ‘high end audio’ that Tharbamar was talking about!!! Very Engaging, Immersive, and one of the most incredible listening experiences I’ve ever had, 10/10.

When playing music that caters to this speakers strengths, they produce such a magical immersive soundscape I happily abandoned my old favourite genres in search of new artists and bands which I have now added to my favourites list. These speakers have got me researching music I have never given much attention to. In the back of my mind though I am hoping the speakers are going through an opening up process and soon my old favourites and I will be able to sing, dance, rap, head bang, air guitar, swing and sway and drum on the coffee table and get told off by the mrs. For now I am enjoying what these things are currently capable of and they are making me smile.

After a few months I started to detect that something wasn’t quite as I remember my old favourite songs to be. I hooked up my 15-20 year old Heybrook HB1’s to do do a comparison. The A/B testing instantly confirmed something I had felt but not been able to articulate. The HB1’s don’t sound as detailed, smooth or full bodied, the soundstage isn’t as spacious and the overall presentation is not comparable BUT within seconds of pressing play I noticed they offer more in the way of responsiveness, dynamics, punch and with a touch more brightness to them that seemed to reveal a little more detail. I got a feeling that is almost absent in the 4.2’s… Energy, a feeling that made me want to move and groove to the music. I hooked up the 4.2’s and played the same songs and my heart broke a little as I realised these beautiful speakers that I have fallen in love with don’t have something which for my listening preferences is vital to the enjoyment of my music. Kick drums play an important role in Rock, Dance, Hip Hop, D&B etc and sadly the 4.2’s are weak in that department. The sound is there but its more of a tap rather than a punch. In some songs the HB1’s revealed a rhythmic grove that seemed non existent in the Evo’s.

I made some notes as conducted the A/B comparison through the genres I listen to the most.

Reggae:
Lower bass plays an important role in this genre, the 4.2’s full bodied bass offering sounds plentiful and complements the genre, the vocals shine through, the highs are there in pleasing amounts. The swirling psychedelic echo effects in dub reggae are especially well suited to the immersive soundscape these speakers create. Burning Spear, Fat Freddys Drop & Gentlemans Dub Club sound brilliant.

I am a great fan of the British Dub Reggae band “Gentlemans Dub Club" and they sound great on this system. If there is any lack of punch its overshadowed by the overall quality of sound. If there is another sound system out there within my budget that can do what these speakers do but with that missing ingredient, I will have made it to audio heaven and I can end this consuming quest.

Soul:
Vocals & instruments come through brilliantly and overall is a very smooth and enjoyable listen. D’angelo’s Voodoo album sounds fantastic.

Blues:
In the various reviews I had read before buying these speakers, Blues music had been mentioned as being one of its strengths so despite not really being a fan of the genre, I began to explore it. Whoa! This is one of those genres that allows the speakers to produce magic. Strong vocals and instruments are this speakers forte they create a wide and deep soundstage, a musical environment envelops you and you feel like you can reach out and touch the sounds. Any emotion in the vocals is tangible and the striking instrument separation makes for a very enjoyable listening experience. Blues sounds so incredible on these speakers that I am now a fan of the genre. A blues recording by Tom Jones, "Soul Of A Man" is a phenomenal listening experience.

Rock:
Although vocals and instruments are this speakers strong points Rock is a great place to identify an area of their weakness. The kick drum doesn’t have much kick to it. It’s there but its subdued, more of a tap than a thump. I now realise that the kick drum is where a lot of energy comes from and this speaker is lacking in it.

Hip Hop:
Vocals and instruments come through with spaciousness and sound better on the Wharfedales but the HB1’s project them forward with focus and an attack that thrusts words in your face. They also provide more brightness and punchier sound that suits this genre. A song by UK Hip Hop artist Giggs titled “Man Are Outside” is a great example of this and is much more enjoyable experience on the HB1’s. To confuse matters slightly, I tested Killing Me Softly on the HB1’s and they were not a patch on the 4.2’s.

R&B - low-mid tempo songs sound great, strong vocals really shine through. Lauryn Hill’s “The Miseducation” sounds phenomenal.

Dance - Again the sound that comes is pleasing, vocals sound brilliant, any other background, soundscape noises are enjoyable but there is something not quite as I expect dance music to sound. I’m beginning to understand why these speakers a classed as being ‘laid back’. A lack of dynamics and the type of energy that gives dance music its name is missing. I don’t feel like dancing. Hmm…

Drum & Bass
Immediately after I pressed play on the first drum and bass song I noticed something wasn’t right. The kick drum seemed to lack impact, the sound was there but it was thin with no ‘punch’, it was more of a tap. After noticing this area of lack, I hooked up the HB 1’s, not quite as detailed, not quite as clear, not quite as bassy BUT despite their shortcomings the were more enjoyable, more responsive, had a little more punch to them, more of that something within music that make you want to get up and dance. They had a touch more brightness to them which revealed parts of the song that had been veiled by the 4.2’s. A lift in the upper frequencies, a little less lower bass but with a little more punch to them. The result is something I can only describe as ‘groove’ and for some genres of music that ‘groove’ is one of the most important ingredients. I realised that despite all the great things they can do, they don’t provide that certain something that makes you want to get up and dance, the something that makes you really feel the music.


And so that concludes my experience with these beautiful speakers that I am still in love with. I'm going to find it very difficult to part with them. They are certainly going to be a hard act to follow and I won't be letting them go until I have found a worthy replacement. Speaking of which, Cheap Audio Man & Steve Guttenberg have just uploaded two very interesting videos on the new Elac Unfi Reference speakers. Although they don't look as beautiful as the Wharfies, they describe them to be exactly what I am looking for in a speaker and I am intent on hearing them for myself. Wish me luck!
A very interesting assessment. I owned a pair of JPW AP2s for many years and found they were fatiguing yet revealing. They had the 8" Vifa bass/midrange and tweeter, which I believe, were shared with the Heybrook model. Previously to owning the JPWs I had Wharfedale Teesdale SP2 and they were laid back and lacked attack. Eventually I stumbled across the Kef iq range and they had the balance I needed which was excitement with a well balanced midrange and sweet treble.
 

AJM1981

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Mar 26, 2021
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A very interesting assessment. I owned a pair of JPW AP2s for many years and found they were fatiguing yet revealing. They had the 8" Vifa bass/midrange and tweeter, which I believe, were shared with the Heybrook model. Previously to owning the JPWs I had Wharfedale Teesdale SP2 and they were laid back and lacked attack. Eventually I stumbled across the Kef iq range and they had the balance I needed which was excitement with a well balanced midrange and sweet treble.
Balance is key. What should be mentioned is that the user review you cited indicates about characteristics. I know it isn't punchy in hiphop but one can not own a neutral sounding speaker that is at the same time energetic and punchy. A speaker can be an average of things, an all round but it can't be neutral one and a specialized one in one package. At least not without handling at least the tone controls.

Certain genres like Hiphop, triphop etc are produced for clubs and those clubs use speakers to accomodate the experience. I owned the B&W 602s3 before my Evo 4.2 and those B&Ws were just that, energetic and punchy. Really consumer orientated with a flavor. They were not that well all round, did great with providing more energy in heavier rock and hip hop. But from a producer's point of view, the big bass sometimes stood in the way of tracks that already had big bass in them. That was the reason I tuned down its bass. Just to get them to sound more neutral. The B&Ws mentioned kind of have it in them to be neutral, but they are not created to be neutral. So it is difficult to get it right.

The Evo series is often mentioned being in line with the BBC Ls3/5a in terms of balance and signature. I dubbed over getting a pair of those classic monitors once when there wasnt that much of a hype yet, but they have reached collectors' Valhalla over many yesrs. Even the new clones are expensive. Then it is good to know the Wharfedales aim for a similar sound.
 

Tinman1952

Well-known member
May 19, 2021
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The Evo 4.2 s are an excellent speaker which I owned for many months. My problem was they simply weren't right for my living room. Being a VERY large three way standmount, I found I was having to sit too close to them and the imaging suffered...and the sound didn't really 'gel'.
I flirted with the Dynaudio Emit 10s for a while...much better imaging from this smaller two way speaker but in the end it was too analytical/sharp for me and didn't really go low enough in the bass.
So I then got a great deal on the Wharfedale Denton 80 speakers... which have proved to be just right for my room size and taste. Well for now at least.....😉
 

nopiano

Well-known member
The Evo 4.2 s are an excellent speaker which I owned for many months. My problem was they simply weren't right for my living room. Being a VERY large three way standmount, I found I was having to sit too close to them and the imaging suffered...and the sound didn't really 'gel'.
I flirted with the Dynaudio Emit 10s for a while...much better imaging from this smaller two way speaker but in the end it was too analytical/sharp for me and didn't really go low enough in the bass.
So I then got a great deal on the Wharfedale Denton 80 speakers... which have proved to be just right for my room size and taste. Well for now at least.....😉
Don’t you miss the ‘luxury’ of the ribbon style tweeter? It’s a while since I heard some excellent Elac with a similar driver but they were as sweet as can be.
 

AJM1981

Well-known member
Mar 26, 2021
379
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1,070
The Evo 4.2 s are an excellent speaker which I owned for many months. My problem was they simply weren't right for my living room. Being a VERY large three way standmount, I found I was having to sit too close to them and the imaging suffered...and the sound didn't really 'gel'.
I flirted with the Dynaudio Emit 10s for a while...much better imaging from this smaller two way speaker but in the end it was too analytical/sharp for me and didn't really go low enough in the bass.
So I then got a great deal on the Wharfedale Denton 80 speakers... which have proved to be just right for my room size and taste. Well for now at least.....😉
Would have done the same. The choice of speakers usually follow the kind of room. Have you considered the Evo 4.1? The Dentons are great ones too. Bit like a smaller Linton.

In my living room the distances and conditions are fitting. I really hear a difference between the evo 4.2 and the diamond 11. 2

However when I put the Evo's in the master bedroom they underperform and the smaller diamonds seem to take more advantage of those conditions. It seems this is what they meant calling it a bit of a difficult speaker, especially with the amt and its odd behaviour (someone passing by and the treble is gone) :)

In the bedroom I had a choice between my Diamond 12.0 and a later 11.2 that I received almost for free. The 12.0 sounded tighter and are near perfect there but I liked the cabinet volume difference advantage of the 11.2. The most ideal best of both worlds speaker would probably be the Diamond 12.2 here and whenever I can lay my hands on a pair, also the dentons would not be excluded.
 
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Tinman1952

Well-known member
May 19, 2021
1,423
846
2,070
Would have done the same. The choice of speakers usually follow the kind of room. Have you considered the Evo 4.1? The Dentons are great ones too. Bit like a smaller Linton.

In my living room the distances and conditions are fitting. I really hear a difference between the evo 4.2 and the diamond 11. 2

However when I put the Evo's in the master bedroom they underperform and the smaller diamonds seem to take more advantage of those conditions. It seems this is what they meant calling it a bit of a difficult speaker, especially with the amt and its odd behaviour (someone passing by and the treble is gone) :)

In the bedroom I had a choice between my Diamond 12.0 and a later 11.2 that I received almost for free. The 12.0 sounded tighter and are near perfect there but I liked the cabinet volume difference advantage of the 11.2. The most ideal best of both worlds speaker would probably be the Diamond 12.2 here and whenever I can lay my hands on a pair, also the dentons would not be excluded.
Yes I am still tempted by the Evo 4.1....😀 might have to try them out next....😉
 
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AJM1981

Well-known member
Mar 26, 2021
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Yes I am still tempted by the Evo 4.1....😀 might have to try them out next....😉
Keep an eye at open box offers from its distributor for a decent bargain. :)

Just shot my idea of getting the Elysian 1 by the way. The discounted price of 1800 euros for the speakers in its Walnut variation is seriously tempting but there is no way to avoid the official 700 euro priced stands for the best fit. A normal stand might support its weight, but stability is probably low. I feel the advantage of the deal is lost in the disadvantage of a hugely overpriced support.
 
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