Stereo image distance distance... too close to the speaker front plane?

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Fandango Andy

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Incidentally, what kind of music are you listening to that has so much depth of filed?
Disregarding classical recordings, most music up until fairly recently has been mixed with a relatively flat depth. After all, they only really got the hang of recording in stereo in the late 70's.
Now, with recent advances in technology things are going crazy. Dolby Atmos for the home? Seriously?
Some mixes are now done in 5.1 and then converted back to stereo. This technique actually allows one to more accurately push things away and bring things forward, even though it's still only a stereo mix at the end.
Moving things back and forth using stereo only usually involves level, eq and reverb as well as panning to create the depth and placement.
Headphones like the Sony MDR MV1 allow us to do this at home without even using a 5.1 speaker system (using the 5.1 output in the DAW).

Multi track recording is so absolutely artificial and unrealistic that if most folks listened to something recorded naturally (in a acoustically perfect hall with a Decca mic tree or a Dummy Head microphone pair) they would consider it odd and weird sounding.
Lost track of all the comments on this thread, not sure who you are asking about depth of field. What are they suggesting the experience?

Classical aside, I find 50s and 60s Jazz recordings to have the best soundstage. 80s onwards has very little depth of field.

On a totally different note modern mixes, even modern remasters of old recordings are all volume and no dynamic range.
 
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Kutusov

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Classical aside, I find 50s and 60s Jazz recordings to have the best soundstage. 80s onwards has very little depth of field.

On a totally different note modern mixes, even modern remasters of old recordings are all volume and no dynamic range.
That's very similar to my thoughts on the matter. And for some reason, modern Country, Alt-Country and Americana in general are spectacularly well recorded.

I should add that I listen exclusively to lossless rips and DACs have a very important role here. Moving to an R2R dac gave me plenty of depth of field that was non-existent on my previous delta-sigma dacs. It's crazy but the dac was the most significant upgrade I did until now. Not even moving from a 1k to an almost 3k amplifier made such dramatic difference.
 

My2Cents

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Nov 10, 2023
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That's very similar to my thoughts on the matter. And for some reason, modern Country, Alt-Country and Americana in general are spectacularly well recorded.

I should add that I listen exclusively to lossless rips and DACs have a very important role here. Moving to an R2R dac gave me plenty of depth of field that was non-existent on my previous delta-sigma dacs. It's crazy but the dac was the most significant upgrade I did until now. Not even moving from a 1k to an almost 3k amplifier made such dramatic difference.
Which R2R DAC are you using?
 

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