I get Samsung

manicm

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As I've acquired my first 4k TV set (LG C1), I think I see why Samsung still holds off Dolby Vision. Because watching snippets of Star Wars on Disney+ it occurred to me that standard HDR is probably going to be good enough for 90% of owners if not more. The quality is more than good enough. Sure Dolby Vision may offer finer details but it's mostly the eagle eyed who will notice.
 

Freddy

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As I've acquired my first 4k TV set (LG C1), I think I see why Samsung still holds off Dolby Vision. Because watching snippets of Star Wars on Disney+ it occurred to me that standard HDR is probably going to be good enough for 90% of owners if not more. The quality is more than good enough. Sure Dolby Vision may offer finer details but it's mostly the eagle eyed who will notice.
Very true.
 
I feel I should know, but is there a difference that I should be aware of? I thought they were essentially the same.
You're correct. Both Dolby Vision and HDR10 are HDR technologies. Dolby Vision uses dynamic metadata, while HDR10 uses static metadata. Dolby Vision bit depth has 12 bit and 68.7 billion colors, while HDR10 has 10 bit and 1.07 billion colors. No television can support Dolby Vision's 12-bit color today. Because a lot of content is mastered and transmitted in 10-bit color, 12-bit color hardware isn't going to do much for you today anyway.
 

nopiano

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You're correct. Both Dolby Vision and HDR10 are HDR technologies. Dolby Vision uses dynamic metadata, while HDR10 uses static metadata. Dolby Vision bit depth has 12 bit and 68.7 billion colors, while HDR10 has 10 bit and 1.07 billion colors. No television can support Dolby Vision's 12-bit color today. Because a lot of content is mastered and transmitted in 10-bit color, 12-bit color hardware isn't going to do much for you today anyway.
Wow, thank you for that!
 
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podknocker

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The human eye cannot discern between so many colours, so all this fancy new TV hardware really is overkill. It's numbers for the sake of it. We all see colour slightly differently also. The only animals that would benefit from Dolby Vision are mantis shrimps and an octopus. Otherwise, 8k videos in 12/16 bit colour depth, is utterly pointless. It's a fixation with increasing tech specs, even when the human eye will never tell the difference.
 

Freddy

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The human eye cannot discern between so many colours, so all this fancy new TV hardware really is overkill. It's numbers for the sake of it. We all see colour slightly differently also. The only animals that would benefit from Dolby Vision are mantis shrimps and an octopus. Otherwise, 8k videos in 12/16 bit colour depth, is utterly pointless. It's a fixation with increasing tech specs, even when the human eye will never tell the difference.
:cool:
 
The human eye cannot discern between so many colours, so all this fancy new TV hardware really is overkill. It's numbers for the sake of it. We all see colour slightly differently also. The only animals that would benefit from Dolby Vision are mantis shrimps and an octopus. Otherwise, 8k videos in 12/16 bit colour depth, is utterly pointless. It's a fixation with increasing tech specs, even when the human eye will never tell the difference.
I've just been reading a book about the electromagnetic spectrum - the human eye's ability to differentiate between very subtly different shades of green is far, far better than you would think.
 

podknocker

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It's not better than I think, because I know human vision is far superior to many species. It's nowhere near as good as a mantis shrimp, however, with eyes capable of seeing far more colours, due to more cones etc. They can also see polarised light. An octopus has better vision because of the lack of a blind spot, on the retina. They can't see colours, however. The skin of an octopus can be regarded as it's eyes also and the receptors in the skin cells can detect or 'see' the surroundings and change accordingly.
 
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podknocker

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I think there will be many marine biologists that would disagree with that. Mantis shrimp are capable of seeing UV light also. Humans will never evolve UV vision. These creatures have unique and amazing eyeballs.
 
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You're missing my point - a broader spread of detectable frequencies doesn't necessarily equate to better vision, it equates to vision better suited to that animal's life. The mantis shrimp has smaller eyes than humans, so cramming in a greater quantity of receptor types means you have fewer in each band.

Humans can differentiate greens with differing wavelengths of a single nanometer - I think that's pretty impressive by any estimation.

Anyway, I think we're definitely heading off topic, so I'll leave it there.
 
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podknocker

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A parting shot, if I may. My initial point regarding TV panels and 16 bit colour depth (48 bit with the RGB combined) is still more than we can see. Some of us will see a red on a flower, where someone else will see the red next to it, for example. My argument was to highlight the fact that TV panels can reproduce more colours that the human eye can detect. At some point, there's no point. Nature has given us amazing tools for vision and all the technology we make now, will just be numbers, for the sake of it. Give an 18 year old a new TV, producing red number 1 trillion and then ask them to say when they see red number 1 trillion and 1 etc. That was my point. It's now become fanatical in the technology sector. Your eyes are just not up to it. I will leave it there!
 

Freddy

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I personally like Samsung’s QLED TVs very much, they have great colour, they are good in the day with sunlight, blacks are OLED like and no screen burn.
 

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