do i need dolby vision?

MariTopHigh

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I'm buying a new 65" tv and I'm trying to figure out if I need dolby vision because I really like the new QD oled from samsung. I'm deciding between the philips 808/LG c3/samsung s90c. I like the samsung best because of its brightness, but it scares me the absence of dolby vision. We mostly watch netflix/hbo, sometimes some PS5 and classic TV broadcasts which I suspect are 720p. So my main question is do I need dolby vision? for an amateur there is a noticeable difference when watching a movie on netflix, is dolby vision on , or HDR10?

Thank you!
 

abacus

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DV comes into its own with TVs that have low light output.
Most films in HDR (And Steaming) are mainly done at 1000nits, so providing your TV has a brighter level than this (QD OLEDS do) you will be fine without DV.
If you only buy 4000nit films (Very few and far between) then DV will help.

Bill
 
I don't think you need be scared of its absence, but I'd have a strong preference for a set with both. The gains in HDR are often as impressive as the gains in higher resolution, particularly in older films. I'd not be wanting to miss out myself.
 

My2Cents

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How do you know that the Samsung is any brighter than the Phillips or LG?
When TV's are on display in a store they are set to a 'store mode' which is a setting that is designed to make the TV look ultra bright/sharp and super color saturated (makes them look better against their competition)... a mode that you would not want to use at home.
HDR is essential but Dolby Vision is just an enhanced form of HDR.
Kinda funny really, because most folks get the TV home, find a color preset that works for them and leave it at that.
A ton of digital processing (that defaults to 'on' for almost every preset) typically makes the picture awful and often leads to the 'soap opera effect', but folks don't even notice.
Few people actually go to the trouble of getting their nice new TV 'calibrated' under the lighting conditions and in the room and that they are actually watching the set in.
Some electronics retailers offer calibration services, but due to the cost, these are usually only taken advantage of by folks who buy high end TV's. However, there are ways to calibrate even a budget TV yourself so that you can get the best possible from the picture.
 
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abacus

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How do you know that the Samsung is any brighter than the Phillips or LG?
When TV's are on display in a store they are set to a 'store mode' which is a setting that is designed to make the TV look ultra bright/sharp and super color saturated (makes them look better against their competition)... a mode that you would not want to use at home.
HDR is essential but Dolby Vision is just an enhanced form of HDR.
Kinda funny really, because most folks get the TV home, find a color preset that works for them and leave it at that.
A ton of digital processing (that defaults to 'on' for almost every preset) typically makes the picture awful and often leads to the 'soap opera effect', but folks don't even notice.
Few people actually go to the trouble of getting their nice new TV 'calibrated' under the lighting conditions and in the room and that they are actually watching the set in.
Some electronics retailers offer calibration services, but due to the cost, these are usually only taken advantage of by folks who buy high end TV's. However, there are ways to calibrate even a budget TV yourself so that you can get the best possible from the picture.
Plenty of review sites out there that measure the TVs in both there brightest and most accurate modes, as well as calibrated & OOTB.

Bill
 
Have you tried comparing the 2 without knowing which was which.

Bill
Watching DV and HDR films, it's fairly easy to work out which is which if you know what you're looking for. HDR movies can look great in places, where their "single setting" aligns with the right scenes, but you'll usually tell in the darker and brighter scenes, which will lack a bit of contrast - darker scenes can look a bit washed out, greyish, and lighter scenes can look a bit too bright.
 
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My2Cents

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Plenty of review sites out there that measure the TVs in both there brightest and most accurate modes, as well as calibrated & OOTB.

Bill
Measurements and specifications by 'sites' and manufacturers are most often meaningless.
If a TV advertises 6000 nits and another 10000 it's irrelevant as there is a whole lot more to producing the picture. Contrast control, how the image is processed and tone mapping are just a few of them.
 

abacus

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Measurements and specifications by 'sites' and manufacturers are most often meaningless.
If a TV advertises 6000 nits and another 10000 it's irrelevant as there is a whole lot more to producing the picture. Contrast control, how the image is processed and tone mapping are just a few of them.
This is the type of review I am talking about Samsung

Bill
 
I'm still not all the wiser about it
HDR has a single setting for the whole film. It's fixed, based on an average over the whole film. Whether this is chosen manually or automatically, I don't know. If it's geared for lighter scenes, darker scenes will look more grey than black, if it's geared more for darker screens, lighter scenes will look too light. It could be set to an average setting, but an average will be a compromise on many scenes - all depends on how the film is shot.

DolbyVision works with metadata within the movie itself, and works on a scene to scene or even frame by frame basis. This means that it can get the best out of light and dark scenes during a movie, continually adjusting to work throughout the film, not just stuck on one setting.

HDR10+ is an equivalent to DolbyVision.
 
If it's geared for lighter scenes, darker scenes will look more grey than black, if it's geared more for darker screens, lighter scenes will look too light
I'll take your word for that, but it's not anything I'd noticed. Maybe the films I have on 4k have been well-executed. Giving one example, the detail in blacks in Alien is so far ahead of the blu ray it's startling - opening sequences and section before Parker and Lambert are attacked spring to mind. That said, I'll probably check and find it's DV rather than HDR...
 
I'll take your word for that, but it's not anything I'd noticed. Maybe the films I have on 4k have been well-executed. Giving one example, the detail in blacks in Alien is so far ahead of the blu ray it's startling - opening sequences and section before Parker and Lambert are attacked spring to mind. That said, I'll probably check and find it's DV rather than HDR...
Occasionally it's not been done well, and the whole film looks way too dark - I'm used to it now and have settings pre-set to just select and watch. It's not a flawless technology, but when done right, it's stunning.
 
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My2Cents

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The bottom line for the OP's original post (and based on their chosen content streaming service, i.e. Netflix) is:
Netflix does not currently support HDR10+ and is currently leaning towards DV.
The PS5 does not support DV when playing Blu Ray discs (only for gaming).
Watching "classic TV broadcasts"... I doubt that it really matters what you have, perhaps buy an old cathode ray tube TV and get the 'authentic' vintage experience?
HDR10+ is a proprietary Samsung technology and so Samsung is not currently supporting DV.
Very few TV's support both, however as you already know, some Philips sets do (along with some Panasonic, TCL and Hisense sets).
The Phillips 808 that you mentioned even has HDR10+ 'adaptive' along with DV.

Perhaps reading this article may clear up some of your questions?

Regarding the 'advanced' types of HDR, we're currently in a 'Betamax versus VHS' standoff between manufacturers at this current time. Who knows what the future holds? So, if the lack of DV 'scares' you perhaps splash out and buy a TV that has both?
 
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Azzuro

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I'm buying a new 65" tv and I'm trying to figure out if I need dolby vision because I really like the new QD oled from samsung. I'm deciding between the philips 808/LG c3/samsung s90c. I like the samsung best because of its brightness, but it scares me the absence of dolby vision. We mostly watch netflix/hbo, sometimes some PS5 and classic TV broadcasts which I suspect are 720p. So my main question is do I need dolby vision? for an amateur there is a noticeable difference when watching a movie on netflix, is dolby vision on , or HDR10?

Thank you!
You don't "need" anything necessarily. However, if you want a QD-OLED at 65" that supports Dolby Vision, your only choice is the Sony A95L (which is much more expensive). The Samsung doesn't have it. If you want similar brightness (but perhaps not quite the same color volume), the G3 has Dolby Vision. But the G3 and A95L are in a higher price bracket. I don't know much about the Phillips to comment. Obviously from a hardware perspective the S90C outguns the LG C3 especially on brightness and color volume. The LG would have the edge on Dolby Vision and out of the box picture accuracy and processing. Most would probably opt for the S90C over the C3 at the same price. I went for the C3 because I am after 83" where QD-OLED doesn't play.
 
I think brightness is getting out of hand with TVs. When I first got my Sony X9505 I'd have it fairly bright, enjoying its abilities over my previous TV. But after a year or so I started turning the brightness down as it was just getting too much (especially given the amount of films I watch. I do want to upgrade to a Sony MiniLED, but I'll not be adding any more brightness than I'm currently happy with!
 
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I think brightness is getting out of hand with TVs. When I first got my Sony X9505 I'd have it fairly bright, enjoying its abilities over my previous TV. But after a year or so I started turning the brightness down as it was just getting too much (especially given the amount of films I watch. I do want to upgrade to a Sony MiniLED, but I'll not be adding any more brightness than I'm currently happy with!
Although peak brightness isn't much about how bright the screen is; it's the ability to produce rich detailed contrasts. HDR brightness is a measure of how bright a TV can get while displaying HDR content. Higher peak brightness results in brighter highlights that stand out better.
 
Although peak brightness isn't much about how bright the screen is; it's the ability to produce rich detailed contrasts. HDR brightness is a measure of how bright a TV can get while displaying HDR content. Higher peak brightness results in brighter highlights that stand out better.
I was going to get into that in my post, but decided to keep things simple. Important for overall contrast, but generally a bit OTT for movie viewing in low light levels.
 

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