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Vinyl vs Digital Hype

stereoman

Well-known member
Mar 22, 2016
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Guys, just a word from me regarding the recent debates how Vinyl is much better than streaming, CD, digital etc. Actually the truth can be this. It is not better in anything than these digital media. The people, including myself of course, are becoming Vinyl fans NOT because it DOES sound better - it is just the "magic" of the format itself. You get everything enlarged so that makes an incredibly good impresion on a listener. ART strikes big. Of course the sound is great but - dear audiophiles - one more time - it is not better than CDs. I actually turn a blind eye to the Vinyl fans who claim how eternally they abandoned CDs etc. and will only focus on Vinyl. Also you can get a very good sound buying a medium priced TT with a better Cart without spending thousands of pounds on a high end TT at the begining and it will still sound great. The expensive TTs will not give you the best sound ever I presume but only lift the quality a bit just like expensive CD players....Again - Vinyl - It is just a different form of listening.
 
macdiddy said:
and tell them to stop selling these turntables:

http://www.analogueseduction.net/clearaudio-turntables/clearaudio-statement-turntable.html

as according to stereoman the sound it produces will only "be a bit" better than a £280 Teac.

*fool*
Everyone is entitled to their opinions....... even the tone deaf.. :)

Perhaps he meant the TEAC with a £4k Koetsu attached v the expensive deck and standard fit cartridge....

And he got it wrong, the original post wasn't about which was 'better' but what the main differences where.
 

plastic penguin

Well-known member
Apr 28, 2008
1,916
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Does this subject justify a dedicated thread, or could this be added to the existing "vinyl v digital", currently ongoing?

Not sure in the context what 'hype' means. Vinyl has been available since year dot and digital since the 80s. Everyone will have their preferred format.
 

lindsayt

New member
Apr 8, 2011
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stereoman, it's a pragmatic thing. If vinyl gives you the better mastered version of a particular recording, then that's the format that's going to sound better (in my system).

I'd rather make my buying decisions on the real world than some idealised version of what the real world should be like.
 

Andrewjvt

New member
Jun 18, 2014
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lindsayt said:
stereoman, it's a pragmatic thing. If vinyl gives you the better mastered version of a particular recording, then that's the format that's going to sound better (in my system).

 

I'd rather make my buying decisions on the real world than some idealised version of what the real world should be like.
The loudness wars is keeping vinyl in business
 

CnoEvil

New member
Aug 21, 2009
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On balance, I don't think the message that Vinyl is far superior to streaming, was one that came out of that thread....which is why David posted what he did, to offset some of the negativity against going analogue.

IMO. A carefully chosen system can make a Digital source sound much more Analogue anyway....so it's a moot point.

Basically, I think arguing about personal preference (which is all that matters in the end), while interesting, is fruitless as it never comes to definitive conclusions. It's like debating whether a painting is a work of brilliance, or a load of bollox.

Sometimes, I think our obsessiveness gets in the way of what's actually important.
 

stereoman

Well-known member
Mar 22, 2016
145
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10,595
Please let me reiterate a bit and state that I am not a tone deaf at all. If you buy a CD player that costs 700 pounds and the same price TT , both should give you an excellent sound quality. BOTH. Regarding sound analysis I definitely cannot say that this TT will be much better than CD - in fact - only different sounding. Try to compare a Denon DCD 1520 AE Cd player and any 700 pound TT for example - you are not gonna tell me it is a heaven - earth difference. Both will sound really good. The CDs never fall out of sales - I repeat - The CDs never fall out and decrease in sales. What people like about TT is the format and a different sound to digital. I love both Vinyls and CDs. The issue with 120K Clear audio TT - please....anything costing so much will give a heavenly sound - this is not a relevant thing to compare in this thread. On the other side - take a listen to a clear sounding hi res studio file - I am pretty sure they sound lovely in comparison to Vinyls and CDs. The last time I was listening to Vinyls was when I was 12 or so....now being 39 and coming back to Vinyls I am totally convinced they are nice but never better sounding than CDs on a medium range good CD player. Please undermine my theory...

P.S. My thread is an answer to the other saying how some Vinyl freaks abandon digital sound forever etc.
 

nopiano

Well-known member
Feb 15, 2009
746
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I think the whole experience of listening to records is different. It was my only source originally, but today it's a novelty for some.

If you 'get it', then you may love it, and your ability to distinguish it from another good source may not be too dependable as a result!

Logically there is no way even the finest diamond waggling around in the cleanest and best recorded vinyl groove can ever beat a good digital file or CD. But as others have said before, as you go up the quality ladder the best sources get closer in sound, not further apart. So with the added "romance" or faff of records, it's easy to get carried away in any judgements.
 

CnoEvil

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Aug 21, 2009
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Your view cannot be proved or disproved, as the perception of sound is subjective....as well as system, set up and room dependent....and that's not getting into which format, on a given album, is mastered better.
 

stereoman

Well-known member
Mar 22, 2016
145
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10,595
CnoEvil said:
Your view cannot be proved or disproved, as the perception of sound is subjective....as well as system, set up and room dependent....and that's not getting into which format, on a given album, is mastered better.
It's ok - I hope you got my point. Simply a statement for Vinyl freaks who have just claimed to abandon Digital because of the fact "how inferior it is ". ;)
 
stereoman said:
CnoEvil said:
Your view cannot be proved or disproved, as the perception of sound is subjective....as well as system, set up and room dependent....and that's not getting into which format, on a given album, is mastered better.
It's ok - I hope you got my point. Simply a statement for Vinyl freaks who have just claimed to abandon Digital because of the fact "how inferior it is ". ;)
I wasn't aware there were many that had said that.
 

nick8858

New member
Aug 8, 2011
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I have all 3. Vinyl, CD and streaming. I don't really notice any perceptible difference per se (my ears are knocking on 60 years old by the way!). Vinyl is great when you want to listen to a full album. Too much of a faff to switch tracks and nice to watch that circular motion and get an unexpected pop now and again. CD also. Streaming is grat for track skipping. Sound quality boils down to 1 single factor - the quality of the original recording. If the source recording is gunk then vinlyl/CD/Streaming will reproduce exactly that - rubbish sound. It is nice to have a vinyl cover to read whilst listening, some have nice booklets etc as well. Each and all have their own strengths but all have a place in my home. For me the late 50's ad 60's were the pinnacle of quality (I listen to a lot of classical stuff). Decca in particular had some of the most outstanding record producers of pure genius who recorded in clapped out town halls and churches with fantastic results. I'm afraid some "modern" stduios can't hold a candle to these folk even with all the technology at their disposal. I hope all the formats enjoy a long happy life
 

Alberich

New member
Mar 15, 2016
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nick8858 said:
I have all 3. Vinyl, CD and streaming. I don't really notice any perceptible difference per se (my ears are knocking on 60 years old by the way!). Vinyl is great when you want to listen to a full album. Too much of a faff to switch tracks and nice to watch that circular motion and get an unexpected pop now and again. CD also. Streaming is grat for track skipping. Sound quality boils down to 1 single factor - the quality of the original recording. If the source recording is gunk then vinlyl/CD/Streaming will reproduce exactly that - rubbish sound. It is nice to have a vinyl cover to read whilst listening, some have nice booklets etc as well. Each and all have their own strengths but all have a place in my home. For me the late 50's ad 60's were the pinnacle of quality (I listen to a lot of classical stuff). Decca in particular had some of the most outstanding record producers of pure genius who recorded in clapped out town halls and churches with fantastic results. I'm afraid some "modern" stduios can't hold a candle to these folk even with all the technology at their disposal. I hope all the formats enjoy a long happy life
Indeed. Culshaw, Perry, Brown, just to name a few. What a team.
Not very many of their ilk left.
 

nopiano

Well-known member
Feb 15, 2009
746
460
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Alberich said:
nick8858 said:
I have all 3. Vinyl, CD and streaming. I don't really notice any perceptible difference per se (my ears are knocking on 60 years old by the way!). Vinyl is great when you want to listen to a full album. Too much of a faff to switch tracks and nice to watch that circular motion and get an unexpected pop now and again. CD also. Streaming is grat for track skipping. Sound quality boils down to 1 single factor - the quality of the original recording. If the source recording is gunk then vinlyl/CD/Streaming will reproduce exactly that - rubbish sound. It is nice to have a vinyl cover to read whilst listening, some have nice booklets etc as well. Each and all have their own strengths but all have a place in my home. For me the late 50's ad 60's were the pinnacle of quality (I listen to a lot of classical stuff). Decca in particular had some of the most outstanding record producers of pure genius who recorded in clapped out town halls and churches with fantastic results. I'm afraid some "modern" stduios can't hold a candle to these folk even with all the technology at their disposal. I hope all the formats enjoy a long happy life
Indeed. Culshaw, Perry, Brown, just to name a few. What a team. Not very many of their ilk left.
I agree too. I live the Kingsway Hall recordings where you hear the underground tube trains in quiet passages!

I loved the book by Suvi Raj Grubb, out of print but on eBay etc. Great insight into the various maestros of the past, and how to record and edit properly.
 

Gazzip

New member
Jan 15, 2011
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nopiano said:
I think the whole experience of listening to records is different. It was my only source originally, but today it's a novelty for some.

If you 'get it', then you may love it, and your ability to distinguish it from another good source may not be too dependable as a result!

Logically there is no way even the finest diamond waggling around in the cleanest and best recorded vinyl groove can ever beat a good digital file or CD. But as others have said before, as you go up the quality ladder the best sources get closer in sound, not further apart. So with the added "romance" or faff of records, it's easy to get carried away in any judgements.
+1

I didn't get it so have recently traded my turntable after only a year. However I can see the allure of vinyl. Taking it out of the sleeve, placing it on the platter, cleaning it, the moment the stylus hits the groove etc. Very romantic but not for everyone.
 

stereoman

Well-known member
Mar 22, 2016
145
13
10,595
Gazzip said:
nopiano said:
I think the whole experience of listening to records is different. It was my only source originally, but today it's a novelty for some.

If you 'get it', then you may love it, and your ability to distinguish it from another good source may not be too dependable as a result!

Logically there is no way even the finest diamond waggling around in the cleanest and best recorded vinyl groove can ever beat a good digital file or CD. But as others have said before, as you go up the quality ladder the best sources get closer in sound, not further apart. So with the added "romance" or faff of records, it's easy to get carried away in any judgements.
+1

I didn't get it so have recently traded my turntable after only a year. However I can see the allure of vinyl. Taking it out of the sleeve, placing it on the platter, cleaning it, the moment the stylus hits the groove etc. Very romantic but not for everyone.
I'm much into it but if LPs were much more cheaper - then many people would be convinced...
 

Gazzip

New member
Jan 15, 2011
88
0
0
stereoman said:
Gazzip said:
nopiano said:
I think the whole experience of listening to records is different. It was my only source originally, but today it's a novelty for some.

If you 'get it', then you may love it, and your ability to distinguish it from another good source may not be too dependable as a result!

Logically there is no way even the finest diamond waggling around in the cleanest and best recorded vinyl groove can ever beat a good digital file or CD. But as others have said before, as you go up the quality ladder the best sources get closer in sound, not further apart. So with the added "romance" or faff of records, it's easy to get carried away in any judgements.
+1

I didn't get it so have recently traded my turntable after only a year. However I can see the allure of vinyl. Taking it out of the sleeve, placing it on the platter, cleaning it, the moment the stylus hits the groove etc. Very romantic but not for everyone.
I'm much into it but if LPs were much more cheaper - then many people would be convinced...
I think there is a lot of truth in that...
 

nopiano

Well-known member
Feb 15, 2009
746
460
19,270
stereoman said:
Gazzip said:
nopiano said:
I think the whole experience of listening to records is different. It was my only source originally, but today it's a novelty for some.

If you 'get it', then you may love it, and your ability to distinguish it from another good source may not be too dependable as a result!

Logically there is no way even the finest diamond waggling around in the cleanest and best recorded vinyl groove can ever beat a good digital file or CD. But as others have said before, as you go up the quality ladder the best sources get closer in sound, not further apart. So with the added "romance" or faff of records, it's easy to get carried away in any judgements.
+1

I didn't get it so have recently traded my turntable after only a year. However I can see the allure of vinyl. Taking it out of the sleeve, placing it on the platter, cleaning it, the moment the stylus hits the groove etc. Very romantic but not for everyone.
I'm much into it but if LPs were much more cheaper - then many people would be convinced...
That's why us oldies still like records. We remember when they were a few pounds (£)! I think when CDs arrived they were about £11 to £12 and LPs were about £5. No doubt Mr Google knows exactly!
 
nopiano said:
stereoman said:
Gazzip said:
nopiano said:
I think the whole experience of listening to records is different. It was my only source originally, but today it's a novelty for some.

If you 'get it', then you may love it, and your ability to distinguish it from another good source may not be too dependable as a result!

Logically there is no way even the finest diamond waggling around in the cleanest and best recorded vinyl groove can ever beat a good digital file or CD. But as others have said before, as you go up the quality ladder the best sources get closer in sound, not further apart. So with the added "romance" or faff of records, it's easy to get carried away in any judgements.
+1

I didn't get it so have recently traded my turntable after only a year. However I can see the allure of vinyl. Taking it out of the sleeve, placing it on the platter, cleaning it, the moment the stylus hits the groove etc. Very romantic but not for everyone.
I'm much into it but if LPs were much more cheaper - then many people would be convinced...
That's why us oldies still like records. We remember when they were a few pounds (£)! I think when CDs arrived they were about £11 to £12 and LPs were about £5. No doubt Mr Google knows exactly!
:)
 

Gazzip

New member
Jan 15, 2011
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davidf said:
nopiano said:
That's why us oldies still like records. We remember when they were a few pounds (£)! I think when CDs arrived they were about £11 to £12 and LPs were about £5.
I seem to recall CDs came in between £15-20. My first one cost me about £15 anyway.
£17.99 for INXS's Kick from HMV was my first CD. It still has the price label on it!
 

nopiano

Well-known member
Feb 15, 2009
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460
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Gazzip said:
davidf said:
nopiano said:
That's why us oldies still like records. We remember when they were a few pounds (£)! I think when CDs arrived they were about £11 to £12 and LPs were about £5.
I seem to recall CDs came in between £15-20. My first one cost me about £15 anyway.
£17.99 for INXS's Kick from HMV was my first CD. It still has the price label on it!
Crumbs, I'm sure I never paid that much, but HMV was expensive back then. I think I remember early Denon orchestral DDD recordings at £14.99 as they were seen as premium Japanese products. I may be thinking of a few years after launch, say 1985, when recordings like Brothers in Arms dominated.
 
Q

QuestForThe13thNote

Guest
Most sources are good nowadays so don't be concerned with is cd better than vinyl or vice versa. If you want to improve your system upgrade amps and speakers. That's all there is to say.
 

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