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townshend audio seismic isolation bars

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plus 1

Well-known member
Dec 5, 2019
988
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570
I think the vibrations you are thinking of are not intended to leave the speakers, other than via the drive units. I've had no bad experiences whatever in trying to dampen out vibration anywhere in my system.

IN terms of which is better, I don't know. I have them doing different things, really. But SolidAir's stuff is definitely rather cheaper, like for like.
my asking of this question (op) was based on my experience with the b&w 601 s2 loudspeakers i had. initially had them with blu-tack between speaker stand and speaker and the sound was blurred / fuzzy (?) with a bumpy one note bass...

this puzzled me as this is exactly how the hifi shop instructed me to set them up...
(i was a total beginner to hifi then 20 years ago and just bought them blind as they fitted my limited budget as a poor student).

after reading some (free) advice from russ andrews as regards to speaker stands etc i removed the blu-tach and just placed them flat on the speaker stands and the sound improved - clearer with better separation and no more lumpy bass !

i put this down to the fact that the cheap / poorly braced cabinets were not damping the vibrations from the drive units properly hence they needed to be released, instead of being "trapped", like they were when using the blu-tach.

i must say the kef ls50's i had were not affected at all as regards to the speaker stands or what was placed under neath them but they are, in my opinion, a properly braced well made cabinet.
 

Al ears

Moderator
my asking of this question (op) was based on my experience with the b&w 601 s2 loudspeakers i had. initially had them with blu-tack between speaker stand and speaker and the sound was blurred / fuzzy (?) with a bumpy one note bass...

this puzzled me as this is exactly how the hifi shop instructed me to set them up...
(i was a total beginner to hifi then 20 years ago and just bought them blind as they fitted my limited budget as a poor student).

after reading some (free) advice from russ andrews as regards to speaker stands etc i removed the blu-tach and just placed them flat on the speaker stands and the sound improved - clearer with better separation and no more lumpy bass !

i put this down to the fact that the cheap / poorly braced cabinets were not damping the vibrations from the drive units properly hence they needed to be released, instead of being "trapped", like they were when using the blu-tach.

i must say the kef ls50's i had were not affected at all as regards to the speaker stands or what was placed under neath them but they are, in my opinion, a properly braced well made cabinet.
Some of the standmount speakers I had came with stands to which they were physically clamped.
Depending on the maker some are better attached this way and yet some like my sealed-box EB2's are better isolated on my Partington Dreadnought stands.
I guess it's all down to personal preference.
 

plus 1

Well-known member
Dec 5, 2019
988
172
570
Some of the standmount speakers I had came with stands to which they were physically clamped.
Depending on the maker some are better attached this way and yet some like my sealed-box EB2's are better isolated on my Partington Dreadnought stands.
I guess it's all down to personal preference.
i understand that the latest b&w designs come with sockets below the bottom plate so they can be bolted to their matching stands.

this of course takes away any confusion to idiots like me as regards to the correct way of setting them up !
 

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