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Ringing the changes

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Drummerdave

Well-known member
Dec 4, 2007
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18,545
It can prove to be very difficult to provide level access to an existing building because the existing floor level is probably higher than the street level in most cases. However the door width can be changed if required and access can be dealt with by management i.e. an shop employee alocated to assist a disabled person into and around the shop, installing a temporary ramp if required.
 

Andrew Everard

New member
May 30, 2007
1,878
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[quote user="plastic penguin"]After a lengthy conversation with Audio-T, he agrees that more should be done for wheelchairs. Since I highlighted the subject of wheelchairs I am horrified that to discover that we would have to do a sixty mile round trip to listen to an amplifier. Or am I wrong?[/quote]

Sorry, was only trying to help...
 

plastic penguin

Well-known member
Apr 28, 2008
1,635
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I know and it's appreciated - honest! I think it shows just how behind we are (Britain, I mean) when it comes to the disabled & those who have difficulty accessing shops and others areas. Even some of the big names fail to meet the minimum requirement for the "wheelies".

Andrew, maybe, given the standing your mag has, you could influence [or even champion] the cause and make it slightly fairer society?
 

PJPro

New member
Jan 21, 2008
274
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I would guess that a good many folk have to do 60 miles or more to audition kit. I had to drive a bit further than that to get to my "local" audio t in chandlers ford. It just comes with living outside of the major cities I guess.
(Incidently, for anyone reading, that particular branch of audio t is on the ground floor with a car park right outside. The demo room is level with the rest of the shop. I can't remember, however, if there is a step to get into the shop or whether they can provide a ramp....sorry).
However, I am not trying to excuses the lack adequate facilities in shops generally.
I went to a college in the Guildford area. As part of the course we had to experience the difficulties people with disabilities face......wheelchair users, blind, deaf, etc. I had to go shopping in Guildford in a wheelchair. It wasn't easy, especially 15 yrs ago. However, I did notice that on the whole people did try and help where they could eg Boots allowed me to use the staff lift to access the upper floor on their store.
 

plastic penguin

Well-known member
Apr 28, 2008
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With respect, I think your missing the point. 60 miles or a 100 miles isn't far in the grand scheme of things. But given the fact that I'm a carer for my other half and young daughter - I also work full-time in London. I hope you can try and understand by Friday evening I am completely cream crackered [as they say]. The last thing I want to do on a Saturday is to drag my family 60 miles if its possible to do the same thing nearer.

My original question was, in theory, simple: Why has the bigger companies not taken the initiative and attempt to address the situation. After all it would be great PR for them! To reiterate further, its not the end of the world if she doesn't go, but why should she or anyone with any type of disability miss out on things we all take for granted. I agree people with a disability are in a minority, but unless we face these challenges progress towards parity. . .or even reaching a compromise will never be fully recognised.
 

PJPro

New member
Jan 21, 2008
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I think either you've got the wrong end of the stick or my clumsy post has caused you to misunderstand me.
All I meant to say was simply that depending where you live, 60 miles isn't that far.
 

plastic penguin

Well-known member
Apr 28, 2008
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If my comments seemed a little strong than I apologize. It wasn't meant to be. Our lives are different from say a "traditional" family, but not out of choice. Due to the "barriers" [trying to be diplomatic here] we have experienced from time to time and the stressess it can put you under you become over protective, my point to you was simply: why travel 60 miles when you buy the same thing 10 miles? She could stay at home, she loves music as much I do. And she wants to pay for half of it!
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
I just struggle with how businesses can turn away customers like this. Have you telephoned and asked them if they have any wheelchair procedures?
 

plastic penguin

Well-known member
Apr 28, 2008
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Apparently not. I have spoken to a few retailers since Saturday and they just don't seem to be geared up for that scenario. They survive because wheelchair users are in a minority - it doesn't make it right, but that's the way it is, it seems
 

plastic penguin

Well-known member
Apr 28, 2008
1,635
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Over the past few weeks I've contacted various hi-fi retailers and random branches. Some have stated that more could be done. Others have said they are in full compliant with the regulations. Two of the bigger outlets have requested any suggestions to be put in writing, which I've done.

I have also liaised with several Disability organisations who are doing there bit to readdress the situation.

Looks like I'm in for a lengthy tussle?
 

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