Do speaker grills really effect sq?

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Anonymous

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I have to agree here, my 9.6 wharfedale diamonds sound way more open with the grills off

shame I prefer the look of them on.
 

GSB

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Mar 27, 2011
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MajorFubar said:
dannycanham said:
MajorFubar said:
Hold your hand about 8 inches from your mouth, blow on it, then do the same again while holding a speaker grille between your mouth and your hand. Notice the difference.

Sound is a movement of air just the same, so seeing that speaker grilles certainly do affect the movement of air, ergo they must effect the sound to some degree, even if only by diffusing the focus.
No changes in air pressure are not the same as air movement. In air movement the air particles travel from one point in space to another point in space. In air pressure the particles press up against their neighbours and then oscillate back to their own space eventually to rest at/near their starting point. The pressed up neighbours press up against their neighbours and this pressing up propagates outwards.
Yeah I know that. Tbh it was a pretty crap analogy but the best I could think of lol
:clap: ....... :rofl:
 

Big Chris

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Grilles off for aesthetic reasons if nothing else, but they are kept handy should anyone with sub 10 year olds come over.

A few months ago I was a bit tardy getting the grilles on, my mate's 4 y.o made a grab for the phase plug in one of my mids. Luckily there was no damage, but that'll teach me for delaying putting the grilles on.:shame:
 

tino

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Sep 29, 2011
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Possibly if the grille material is cloth. Mine are wire mesh and a pain to take off (bolted down) so I'm not about to experiment any time soon. Wonder if my metal grilles are more 'transparent' than cloth?

 

toyota man

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I removed the grills from my speakers and then read all of the posts and not only did it open up the sound stage but there was an improvement in the mid bass on the negitive side though there is some sibblance which all but disapeers when the grills are replaced :cheers: :cheers:
 

alex30

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Hi MajorFubar,

I know this post is centuries old but that is probably the most sensible and illuminating post that I have ever read on any forum. What you say is so easy to demonstrate and makes such sense that anyone can undestand your logic.

Just don't go around being that sensible all the time or you could become a real pain ! (lol) :)
 

plastic penguin

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alex30 said:
Hi MajorFubar,

I know this post is centuries old but that is probably the most sensible and illuminating post that I have ever read on any forum. What you say is so easy to demonstrate and makes such sense that anyone can undestand your logic.

Just don't go around being that sensible all the time or you could become a real pain ! (lol) :)
Also said the same thing zillions of years before in this thread. :)
 

chrisjordan9

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Aug 11, 2021
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Air movement is not the same as no changes in air pressure. Air particles move from one point in space to another in the process of air movement. When particles collide with their neighbours, they press up on them and then oscillate back to their own space, finally coming to a stop at/near their initial place. Neighbors who are squeezed up against each other press up against their neighbours, and this pushing up spreads outwards.


Materials in the path react differently to air movement and air pressure. Microphones are wrapped in material to prevent air movement and eliminate wind noise. This is something that materials can do really well. This material does have an effect on air pressure and, as a result, sound, but only in a minor More way.

With a grill, the number of air particle neighbors to press up against is reduced. The presence of a grill exposes a substance that reacts to air in a unique way. This will have a slight impact on how much pressure fluctuation reaches your ears. As is frequently the case. The impression of the audio is influenced by the knowledge of change rather than the actual change in the audio. Playing in the bath is a simple way to try to picture pressure. It's difficult to splash the top and create high-frequency waves with your palm. With your finger, it's simple. Low frequency waves, on the other hand, have the opposite effect. You can see a rough representation of the mechanical situation that arises when large and tiny speaker cones are used. Now try splashing with your other hand while holding your fingers in the water. The fingers resemble a grill in appearance. The pressure waves should propagate outwardly almost as well as they would without the fingers, but with apparent distortion when the wave passes through them.
 
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