Volume makes a big big difference

Snooker

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Aug 5, 2011
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I have a Yamaha SR C20A sound bar and have just watched Top Gun Maverick, and when I put the volume up to 85 dba max in the plane scenes you really get a cinematic effect, it mostly stays under 78 dba during the plane scenes and I believe in the cinema the dba readings are even higher

I know this sounds an obvious thing to do by turning the volume up, but if you turn it up just a little bit more it can make a big difference in action scenes

It just goes to show volume makes a big big difference, wonder how many people have the volume too low to appreciate the full effects
 
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I have a Yamaha SR C20A sound bar and have just watched Top Gun Maverick, and when I put the volume up to 85 dba max in the plane scenes you really get a cinematic effect, it mostly stays under 78 dba during the plane scenes and I believe in the cinema the dba readings are even higher

I know this sounds an obvious thing to do by turning the volume up, but if you turn it up just a little bit more it can make a big difference in action scenes

It just goes to show volume makes a big big difference, wonder how many people have the volume too low to appreciate the full effects
Pardon?? :)
Would love to play some films louder but if I crank it up the missus starts yelling at me.....
 
Yes, our sensitivity to volume and frequencies is well described thanks to Fletcher and Munson, and the ‘loudness’ function on some amplifiers attempts to compensate.

Sound effects are definitely a beneficiary of high volumes because we know what a real aeroplane or explosion sounds like, so will be more persuaded if levels are realistic.
 
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Snooker

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If I am watching an action film like Top Gun Maverick at a loud volume I will watch the film during the afternoon, it would be too loud to play during the evening
 

Rodolfo

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Volume controls are attenuators, designed to limit/control amplitude. Thus, one does get less as one attenuates more -and vice versa. Indeed, volume controls have sometimes been labeled "attenuator", though that is rare in my experience, and I never discerned any patterns for manufacturers or over time. Are there any out there these days? Any "negative volume" or volume-limiter controls?

I learned decades ago by listening and through reading audio books and mags that I could definitely hear/discern more at higher volumes, as I reduced the attenuation of the dynamic range my electronics could reproduce. BUT, thankfully I also learned that allowing more detail/range to be heard, more dynamic range, could hurt my hearing, and would reduce how well and for how long I'd be able to enjoy great audio -and much video.

Disclaimer: I'm an thankful amateur in my eighth decade who doesn't know Fletcher and Munson, or other audio science, and just appreciates good audio amplitude at ideal levels, i.e., that gives me as much sound/range (volume/amplitude) as I deem is safe. (My HiBy DAP allows me to set the volume at 40 on every start-up and limit my volume setting to 80.) So, "missus" and neighbor limits are good for us on balance and over time.

Great, full but safe listening and watching to @Snooker and all.
 
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abacus

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Volume controls are attenuators, designed to limit/control amplitude. Thus, one does get less as one attenuates more -and vice versa. Indeed, volume controls have sometimes been labeled "attenuator", though that is rare in my experience, and I never discerned any patterns for manufacturers or over time. Are there any out there these days? Any "negative volume" or volume-limiter controls?

I learned decades ago by listening and through reading audio books and mags that I could definitely hear/discern more at higher volumes, as I reduced the attenuation of the dynamic range my electronics could reproduce. BUT, thankfully I also learned that allowing more detail/range to be heard, more dynamic range, could hurt my hearing, and would reduce how well and for how long I'd be able to enjoy great audio -and much video.

Disclaimer: I'm an thankful amateur in my eighth decade who doesn't know Fletcher and Munson, or other audio science, and just appreciates good audio amplitude at ideal levels, i.e., that gives me as much sound/range (volume/amplitude) as I deem is safe. (My HiBy DAP allows me to set the volume at 40 on every start-up and limit my volume setting to 80.) So, "missus" and neighbor limits are good for us on balance and over time.

Great, full but safe listening and watching to @Snooker and all.
Dynamic Range and Volume are not the same.

Bill
 

idc

Well-known member
I max the volume on Spotify and my laptop and then use the amp to control the volume I hear. It has a huge control that is lovely and smooth, so it is easy to make very small increments. For best SQ, I start the day at a much lower volume than at the end. It must be a mood, atmosphere thing.

If any music sounds a bit flat or dull, a tiny increase in volume can make all the SQ difference. I am not surprised that the same effect is found with home cinema. On the rare occasions I watch daytime TV, the volume is slightly less than evening viewing. But it has to go down again late at night, so as not to disturb the sleepers.
 

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