Rega Planar 1 Ground Issue

Simonsterhb

Active member
Oct 7, 2020
6
1
25
Hi guys :)

So I have the Planar 1 from Rega. With my speakers turned on I can hear a buzzing sound, and I have figured that it might be because I don't have ground connection. I've spoken with the man from my local Hi-Fi-store and he told me the same thing.

The problem is that i really can't find anywhere to place the ground wire in the turntable... I've read other threads with the same problem, but I've never found an answer to where/how I can put the ground wire into the Planar 1.

Does anyone know what I should do?

Thanks in advance :)
 

nopiano

Well-known member
Feb 15, 2009
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20,070
AFAIK no Regas have a flying earth. My Rega arm definitely doesn’t.

Before you start, has it just begun doing this? Is the P1 new? Try repositioning the cables or the turntable, in case you’re picking up hum from a transformer or mains cable.

Should that not help, try this. If you fasten a wire to your amplifier‘s earth/ground terminal, usually near the phono inputs, then use the other end as a ‘probe’ to find a suitable point on the turntable. That might be under the arm somewhere. Make sure the volume is as low as it can be while keeping the hum audible, because when you find something metallic you may get a crackle through the speakers.
 
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Simonsterhb

Active member
Oct 7, 2020
6
1
25
AFAIK no Regas have a flying earth. My Rega arm definitely doesn’t.

Before you start, has it just begun doing this? Is the P1 new? Try repositioning the cables or the turntable, in case you’re picking up hum from a transformer or mains cable.

Should that not help, try this. If you fasten a wire to your amplifier‘s earth/ground terminal, usually near the phono inputs, then use the other end as a ‘probe’ to find a suitable point on the turntable. That might be under the arm somewhere. Make sure the volume is as low as it can be while keeping the hum audible, because when you find something metallic you may get a crackle through the speakers.
1st quesiton: No the hum has been there from day one.

2nd question: It is the 2016 model, which I think is the newest one so far.

To your suggestion: I have tried that, and I did find a spot on my tableturn, where i could hear the crackle through the speakers, but it did only remove an unsiginificant amount of the noise. I feel like the design of the tableturn makes it impossible to place the ground wire anywhere...
 
1st quesiton: No the hum has been there from day one.

2nd question: It is the 2016 model, which I think is the newest one so far.

To your suggestion: I have tried that, and I did find a spot on my tableturn, where i could hear the crackle through the speakers, but it did only remove an unsiginificant amount of the noise. I feel like the design of the tableturn makes it impossible to place the ground wire anywhere...
As far as I am aware the arm tube is internally connected to the left channel signal ground in most Rega designs
 

nopiano

Well-known member
Feb 15, 2009
1,252
861
20,070
1st quesiton: No the hum has been there from day one.

2nd question: It is the 2016 model, which I think is the newest one so far.

To your suggestion: I have tried that, and I did find a spot on my tableturn, where i could hear the crackle through the speakers, but it did only remove an unsiginificant amount of the noise. I feel like the design of the tableturn makes it impossible to place the ground wire anywhere...
Thanks for trying! Is there any source of noise nearby, such as a computer, phone chargers, DECT phones, Homeplug extenders, modems, etc?
 
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daytona600

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Oct 5, 2012
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every turntable ever built several billion of them uses industry standard 3 wire connection ( 2 signal + earth )
except rega they only use 2 wires
google is your friend for a fix ( rega many design faults & how to cure them )

Project use industry standard 3wire but you can use 2wire as they use Built in advanced motor , PSU & motor control systems
rega charge £200 for a external Neo PSU

Project the motor is fed by an internal electronic power supply to avoid mains fluctuations. Nowadays a common idea and one that works well, since the internal power supply is fed low voltage (15V) d.c. from a small external wall-wart power supply unit, switch-mode of course. This means the turntable is not mains earth connected, point being the possibility of hum from an earth loop is ililimated . There are no high voltages in the turntable either: put it in a tub of water and you won’t get a shock

.888unnamed.png
 
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every turntable ever built several billion of them uses industry standard 3 wire connection ( 2 signal + earth )
except rega they only use 2 wires
google is your friend for a fix ( rega many design faults & how to cure them )

Project use industry standard 3wire but you can use 2wire as they use Built in advanced motor , PSU & motor control systems
rega charge £200 for a external Neo PSU

Project the motor is fed by an internal electronic power supply to avoid mains fluctuations. Nowadays a common idea and one that works well, since the internal power supply is fed low voltage (15V) d.c. from a small external wall-wart power supply unit, switch-mode of course. This means the turntable is not mains earth connected, point being the possibility of hum from an earth loop is ililimated . There are no high voltages in the turntable either: put it in a tub of water and you won’t get a shock

.View attachment 1644
Can you clarify how this helps the OP?, apart from saying he should have bought a Pro-Ject
 
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Gray

Well-known member
As Al said in post#5, it's likely that your arm's metalwork is connected to the left channel signal ground (that is the case with my RB300).
In your position though, I'd just want to do a couple of confirmatory checks - which you will know how to do if you've got a multimeter.
Obviously the black painted parts can be ignored, but note that, on my arm at least, not all of the exposed metal connects to ground.

See if you get zero resistance between the headshell screws and L channel RCA plug outer.
If not, look for some exposed metal where the arm mounts to the plinth.
Then on your amp, just confirm the same zero ohms between L channel RCA socket outer and the earth post.
If there's no continuity to L, try the R channel (just in case Rega use that now!)

Next move depends on your findings......
 
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Simonsterhb

Active member
Oct 7, 2020
6
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25
Can I ask what your amplifier is.
The hum indicates an earth loop so rather than worrying about the earth, or lack of, from the turntable you may have to remove an earth from somewhere else.
My amplifier is built in my speakers (Argon Audio Alto 5 Active)
 

Simonsterhb

Active member
Oct 7, 2020
6
1
25
As Al said in post#5, it's likely that your arm's metalwork is connected to the left channel signal ground (that is the case with my RB300).
In your position though, I'd just want to do a couple of confirmatory checks - which you will know how to do if you've got a multimeter.
Obviously the black painted parts can be ignored, but note that, on my arm at least, not all of the exposed metal connects to ground.

See if you get zero resistance between the headshell screws and L channel RCA plug outer.
If not, look for some exposed metal where the arm mounts to the plinth.
Then on your amp, just confirm the same zero ohms between L channel RCA socket outer and the earth post.
If there's no continuity to L, try the R channel (just in case Rega use that now!)

Next move depends on your findings......
Thanks for the suggestion! I will just need to get a multimeter.

You are saying that my arm's metalwork is connected to the left channel signal ground? I am not sure what you mean with 'the left channel signal ground' since I am pretty new with turntables... can you elaborate?
 

Gray

Well-known member
Thanks for the suggestion! I will just need to get a multimeter.

You are saying that my arm's metalwork is connected to the left channel signal ground? I am not sure what you mean with 'the left channel signal ground' since I am pretty new with turntables... can you elaborate?
The RCA plug has a central pin and a surrounding metal body.
It's this (split) surround part that is the ground connection - and where you need to touch with one of your meter probes.
Don't allow the probe to contact the centre pin.

Edit PS:
If you haven't got a meter, you might not want to buy one just for this, so maybe try the following first:
With the arm at rest, try touching that test wire of yours from earth post to headshell screws - see if that kills the hum more effectively.
Another thing to try when all wired up and buzzing, touch the end of the wire on the RCA socket outer on your speaker.
(They're probably already connected, but if not, this will ensure that the arm gets grounded to the post).
Once you find a cure, you can make it permanent.
 
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Simonsterhb

Active member
Oct 7, 2020
6
1
25
The RCA plug has a central pin and a surrounding metal body.
It's this (split) surround part that is the ground connection - and where you need to touch with one of your meter probes.
Don't allow the probe to contact the centre pin.

Edit PS:
If you haven't got a meter, you might not want to buy one just for this, so maybe try the following first:
With the arm at rest, try touching that test wire of yours from earth post to headshell screws - see if that kills the hum more effectively.
Another thing to try when all wired up and buzzing, touch the end of the wire on the RCA socket outer on your speaker.
(They're probably already connected, but if not, this will ensure that the arm gets grounded to the post).
Once you find a cure, you can make it permanent.
Thank you. I will try this :)
 
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