Network set up

Drunkenjoiner

Active member
Feb 13, 2021
9
3
25
Ok guys, I need help with my small home network. I know very little about setting one up so please be kind with any replies.
The attached picture shows my home, garage and soon to be built bar. My Virgin router is central within my house and we get great wifi everywhere in the property. I asked someone who knows 2% more than me and they said run a single Cat 6 cable through the house to the rear Utility room where you can put a switch to run separate cable to the Garage (gym) and the bar.
My needs.
Garage wifi only. I have run a Cat 6 cable already and tested it on numerous occasions for continuity. All good and a Ubiquity Unifi UAP-AC-LITE is already mounted and plugged into a power source.
Bar, wired connections to two smart Tv's, a Yamaha WXA-50 amp and an access point for wifi in there. I am assuming I will need a switch in there but really have no idea.
What hardware do I need and is this an ok way to set this network up. Then once set up what setting will I need to do to get it all up and running?

Many thanks

DJIMG_0150.jpg
 

ThisIsJimmy

Well-known member
Nov 11, 2020
149
65
170
Hello,

For the type of network you have, you don't need to go anything fancy. Because your access points are powered, you also don't need to worry about POE power either. You don't need a managed switch if you are going to let your virgin Router do all the managment.

The only other thing that would come into play here would be environmentals. Most typical switches operating values are around
- 0C - 45C/50C (Temperature in Celcius)
- 10% - 90% Humidity (Non-Condensing)

You'll be fine with something like this: https://www.amazon.co.uk/NETGEAR-GS108UK-Gigabit-Ethernet-Unmanaged/dp/B0000E5SES for normal internal temperatures.

However if temperatures or humidity are likely to go outside of those values you'll need an industrial switch which are a tad more expensive (thinking your bar temperatures here all year round)

in that case, you'd be looking at omething like this: https://www.ebuyer.com/1139581-d-link-dis-100g-10s-8-ports-ethernet-switch-dis-100g-10s

You can get smaller port capacities on both these switch lines if 8 is too many.

Finally ensure that your are using external grade cabling for those external cable runs (guessing you've already done this but just checking). normal internal cable will degrade/rot in external environments. A couple of these should do the job https://www.amazon.co.uk/kenable-Outdoor-Network-GigaBit-Ethernet-Black/dp/B089G9L8HQ/ref=sr_1_8?dchild=1&keywords=kenable+outdoor+network+cable&qid=1617624605&s=computers&sr=1-8. Just choose the lengths you require.

Jimmy
 
  • Like
Reactions: jjbomber

Drunkenjoiner

Active member
Feb 13, 2021
9
3
25
Hello,

For the type of network you have, you don't need to go anything fancy. Because your access points are powered, you also don't need to worry about POE power either. You don't need a managed switch if you are going to let your virgin Router do all the managment.

The only other thing that would come into play here would be environmentals. Most typical switches operating values are around
- 0C - 45C/50C (Temperature in Celcius)
- 10% - 90% Humidity (Non-Condensing)

You'll be fine with something like this: https://www.amazon.co.uk/NETGEAR-GS108UK-Gigabit-Ethernet-Unmanaged/dp/B0000E5SES for normal internal temperatures.

However if temperatures or humidity are likely to go outside of those values you'll need an industrial switch which are a tad more expensive (thinking your bar temperatures here all year round)

in that case, you'd be looking at omething like this: https://www.ebuyer.com/1139581-d-link-dis-100g-10s-8-ports-ethernet-switch-dis-100g-10s

You can get smaller port capacities on both these switch lines if 8 is too many.

Finally ensure that your are using external grade cabling for those external cable runs (guessing you've already done this but just checking). normal internal cable will degrade/rot in external environments. A couple of these should do the job https://www.amazon.co.uk/kenable-Outdoor-Network-GigaBit-Ethernet-Black/dp/B089G9L8HQ/ref=sr_1_8?dchild=1&keywords=kenable+outdoor+network+cable&qid=1617624605&s=computers&sr=1-8. Just choose the lengths you require.

Jimmy
Thank you so much Jimmy for the brilliant reply.
The bar with be fully insulated with 100mm (floor, Roof) and 70mm PIR insulation (walls) so i do not envisage any problems with temperatures to humidity but definitely worth a mention. Cable wise I have indoor only for the indoor run and the real deal outdoor stuff where required. All from Kenable too. I have been doing my own terminations for no other reason than I fancied a go. Hence the multiple continuity tests.
As I have an Ubiquiti AP already in the garage I was going to get another for the bar and these switches.


Will these switches do the job please? I appreciate your recommendations but I would prefer to keep everything to the same brand.

Many thanks
 

ThisIsJimmy

Well-known member
Nov 11, 2020
149
65
170
Sure. They are managed though, so might be a bit more hands on from your standpoint as will likely need configuring, but with all ubiquiti devices, you'll need to download the software and manage them all from your laptop/PC which will act as a mini cloud controller for all your devices.

Make sure you get the power adapter with the switches as your Virgin Router I doubt will deliver POE power to power any of them independently.

Whilst 5 ports will be enough for sure for the utility switch, you might want to give yourself a bit more port count in the bar (just in case you add additional devices, etc.)
 

Drunkenjoiner

Active member
Feb 13, 2021
9
3
25
Sure. They are managed though, so might be a bit more hands on from your standpoint as will likely need configuring, but with all ubiquiti devices, you'll need to download the software and manage them all from your laptop/PC which will act as a mini cloud controller for all your devices.

Make sure you get the power adapter with the switches as your Virgin Router I doubt will deliver POE power to power any of them independently.

Whilst 5 ports will be enough for sure for the utility switch, you might want to give yourself a bit more port count in the bar (just in case you add additional devices, etc.)
Hopefully I can figure it all out. With your input I feel comfortable with this hardware and I take note on the bar switch, thanks. If I have read things correctly, Ubiquiti have an app that I will be able to use to set things up on my phone. I don't think the app allows for advanced settings etc but hopefully it will more than meet my needs.
I assume that this configurating I need to do will allow me to set up a "Guest Portal" in the bar? Something else for me to figure out lol.

Best regards


DJ
 

ThisIsJimmy

Well-known member
Nov 11, 2020
149
65
170
Hopefully I can figure it all out. With your input I feel comfortable with this hardware and I take note on the bar switch, thanks. If I have read things correctly, Ubiquiti have an app that I will be able to use to set things up on my phone. I don't think the app allows for advanced settings etc but hopefully it will more than meet my needs.
I assume that this configurating I need to do will allow me to set up a "Guest Portal" in the bar? Something else for me to figure out lol.

Best regards


DJ
It's GUI driven, so it should be easy enough to configure.
You can configure multiple SSID's on access points easilly, so that shouldn't be anything to fear :)

Jimmy
 

daveh75

Well-known member
Jul 31, 2008
605
29
18,920
Ok guys, I need help with my small home network. I know very little about setting one up so please be kind with any replies.
The attached picture shows my home, garage and soon to be built bar. My Virgin router is central within my house and we get great wifi everywhere in the property. I asked someone who knows 2% more than me and they said run a single Cat 6 cable through the house to the rear Utility room where you can put a switch to run separate cable to the Garage (gym) and the bar.
My needs.
Garage wifi only. I have run a Cat 6 cable already and tested it on numerous occasions for continuity. All good and a Ubiquity Unifi UAP-AC-LITE is already mounted and plugged into a power source.
Bar, wired connections to two smart Tv's, a Yamaha WXA-50 amp and an access point for wifi in there. I am assuming I will need a switch in there but really have no idea.
What hardware do I need and is this an ok way to set this network up. Then once set up what setting will I need to do to get it all up and running?

Many thanks

DJView attachment 2313
Just to add my two peneth...

It's not a great idea daisy chaining layer 2 switches as in your diagram (it'll work but it's sub optimal and pretty much a no no in networking circles)

Looking at your layout, I would suggest it would be better to either keep it as is in your diagram, but eliminate that first switch in the utility room and run the Ethernet cables feeding the garage and bar back to the router and connect directly to it


Or run a single ethernet cable from the router to the bar, and place a switch there, then run another ethernet cable from bar to garage connected to said switch to feed the AP in the garage.
 
Last edited:

daveh75

Well-known member
Jul 31, 2008
605
29
18,920
It's GUI driven, so it should be easy enough to configure.
You can configure multiple SSID's on access points easilly, so that shouldn't be anything to fear :)

Jimmy
On the subject of Ubiquiti, I use their gear at home and have deployed it for customers but their data breaches and the way that they handle them is giving pause for thought and don't know I would still recommend them or continue to trust them.


I think it's overkill for the OPs setup too.

An unmanaged switch from the likes of Netgear or TP-Link is probably more appropriate.
 

ThisIsJimmy

Well-known member
Nov 11, 2020
149
65
170
It's not a great idea daisy chaining layer 2 switches as in your diagram (it'll work but it's sub optimal and pretty much a no no in networking circles)

Looking at your layout, I would suggest it would be better to either keep it as is in your diagram, but eliminate that first switch in the utility room and run the Ethernet cables feeding the garage and bar back to the router and connect directly to it


Or run a single ethernet cable from the router to the bar, and place a switch there, then run another ethernet cable from bar to garage connected to said switch to feed the AP in the garage.
If you can't hang switches off switches, how on earth do you think networks and network models work then? I get that from a single point of failure standpoint, and also unmanaged switches, but it depends on the network model, and the requirements. Ultimately he's at home here and not a 24x7 office :).

In this case his router is acting as the Core and Edge, whilst the switch in the Utility room would act as distrubution/Access to his access node in the Garage. Really the only thing he'd need to be concerned about with his utility room switch is if he is going to be drawing more than 1Gbps data down it from an uplink standpoint to his Virgin Router. For home usage I find that extremely unlikely from what has been outlined so far.

He has also laid his outdoor structured cabling to the AP and terminated it at this point, so he will need his utility room switch.

On the subject of Ubiquiti, I use their gear at home and have deployed it for customers but their data breaches and the way that they handle them is giving pause for thought and don't know I would still recommend them or continue to trust them.

Ubiquiti All But Confirms Breach Response Iniquity – Krebs on Security
I think it's overkill for the OPs setup too.

An unmanaged switch from the likes of Netgear or TP-Link is probably more appropriate.
Agreed, and i referenced an unmanged Netgear option in my earlier post :).

However bizzarely the Ubiquiti managed switches he linked to were cheaper. If he wants a go at it, I don't see any demerits to him doing so. He will ultimately be having to install the client anyway to manage his access points, so he's not installing anything extra here other than getting his hands dirty with networking. He wont likely get the best out of them regarding VLAN creation and managment, etc as that would need to be managed by his Virgin Router that's acting as the core (and that has limitations by design), but he has got the freedom to experiment in the future if he so chooses to sping up different IP servers/configurations and change his setup as/if his experience and interest grows.
 

Drunkenjoiner

Active member
Feb 13, 2021
9
3
25
Just to add my two peneth...

It's not a great idea daisy chaining layer 2 switches as in your diagram (it'll work but it's sub optimal and pretty much a no no in networking circles)

Looking at your layout, I would suggest it would be better to either keep it as is in your diagram, but eliminate that first switch in the utility room and run the Ethernet cables feeding the garage and bar back to the router and connect directly to it


Or run a single ethernet cable from the router to the bar, and place a switch there, then run another ethernet cable from bar to garage connected to said switch to feed the AP in the garage.
Ok of these option 2 would be favourable to me. I have just ordered 50m of outdoor Cat6 that I could run through the house to the utility and then out to the bar. The drawing is not like real life and the cable I have run (some buried in underground water pipe) goes directly past where the bar is from the garage to the utility. Thus making it easy to cut and re-terminate in the bar. Then connect this up as you say to a switch in the bar. Is this better than linking switches please?
Proposed switch for bar

If this is ok would the garage AP be ok for needs in there and similar one for the bar? For wifi only as all other devices will be hard wired?

All input appreciated guys

Kind regards

DJ
 

ThisIsJimmy

Well-known member
Nov 11, 2020
149
65
170
That's where layer 3 comes in and why I specifically mentioned layer 2 in my initial post...
Missed that bit. Point taken. Still it shouldn't matter in this use case. The topology and requirements here is not big or complicated enough to cause a problem. Either way works.
Ok of these option 2 would be favourable to me. I have just ordered 50m of outdoor Cat6 that I could run through the house to the utility and then out to the bar. The drawing is not like real life and the cable I have run (some buried in underground water pipe) goes directly past where the bar is from the garage to the utility. Thus making it easy to cut and re-terminate in the bar. Then connect this up as you say to a switch in the bar. Is this better than linking switches please?
Go for the cheaper and easier option for you. Both will work.
That will work fine.
If this is ok would the garage AP be ok for needs in there and similar one for the bar? For wifi only as all other devices will be hard wired?
Your APs will work on any network switch as you are powering them locally. For throughput, use a gigabit switch (which you have been looking at).
 
  • Like
Reactions: Drunkenjoiner

Drunkenjoiner

Active member
Feb 13, 2021
9
3
25
Missed that bit. Point taken. Still it shouldn't matter in this use case. The topology and requirements here is not big or complicated enough to cause a problem. Either way works.

Go for the cheaper and easier option for you. Both will work.

That will work fine.

Your APs will work on any network switch as you are powering them locally. For throughput, use a gigabit switch (which you have been looking at).
Thank you for all your input. I will just use one switch, the one in the bar.

1 port from the Virgin router
2 ports to access points (one in garage, one in bar)
2 ports to smart Tv's
1 port to wireless streaming amp.

Not many left lol

Kind regards

DJ
 
  • Like
Reactions: ThisIsJimmy

ASK THE COMMUNITY

TRENDING THREADS

Latest posts