• If you ever spot Spam (either in the forums, or received via forum direct message) please use the Report button at the bottom of each post to make sure a Moderator can handle it quickly. Thanks for your help in keeping things running smoothly!

Dedicated hi-fi room .....

admin_exported

New member
Aug 10, 2019
2,556
2
0
I'm looking to convert the garage in to a living room, if I can manage to get permission to extend it sideways a bit to widen the end product..... and this will likely become a hi-fi and A/V room

Just wondering who has any tips on how to get the best out of this in regard to sound quality, once all is done.

I want to sound proof the room, it will have a concrete floor and a dedicated ring-main, likely using Russ Andrews ring cable.

If I were to use sound-proofing plasterboard, for example, does this absorb sound and have an effect on what you hear in the room, hence dramatically improving [or ruining] aspects of the sound?

Have wondered if putting floor tiles across the speaker end of the room will help isolate and give a good platform for speakers to sit on, or if this is redundant, when a concrete floor will be there. Knowing that sitting speakers on a granite plinth 'can' help, when on carpet ....?

What soft furnishings are useful, such as curtain placement etc etc?

So anyone who has done this and found things that work .... I'm 'all-ears' as it were.

thanks
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
Interesting project! I have never done this, but from my experience room acoustics is certainly in the top 3 of most important aspects for SQ. Googling 'listening room design' gives some interesting links, such as http://jgbouska.tripod.com/audio/room_design.pdf with optimal rooms sizes and the characteristics of different materials, In my experence getting a big sound in a small room is not easy at all, I think you will have to make your design flexible, maybe using adjustable panels, to avoid early reflections from walls and ceiling of the highs and standing waves for the lows. Good luck!
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
hmm an interesting article, though I sometimes wonder why such things can't be written without the technical aspects which go over my head [and possibly many others who read them!] ...... i just want the outcomes that the technical bits give rise to .....

- Non parallel walls - which is definite - if I get the planned permission to widen the room in to the alley at the side of the house, which is triangular, rather than a rectangular space.

- Non parallel ceiling/floor - so vaulted ceiling a good idea

- Acoustic treatment of ceiling / walls, to break up waves .....

- Carpet with heavy underlay

- Damping in room corners

- Additional damping behind curtains, some I have read mention underlay is a good choice (if hidden behind a curtain I guess).

- Concrete Floor

- Says windows are bad, but I believe essential and even 'required' under building regs for such a project as mine.

SO - I have some useful tips so far

Any more, folks!?!?
 

Craig M.

New member
Mar 20, 2008
127
0
0
i would have thought windows would be essential for venting excess bass.
also,
roy gregory had an article in hifi plus about his new listening room.
the guy who designed it said non parallel walls weren't a good idea as
they wouldn't make a difference unless the angles were extreme.
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
Cheers Craig - though one thing to clarify ........ non parallel walls - you mention "not a good idea, as they won't make a difference" ...

So Is it that they are not a good idea, in that they worsen things .....

.... or simply no obvious benefit to be worth deliberately doing in room design, unless you can get enough angle.....

I can only widen one end of the room, so would end up with one wall offset to the other - without doing this, the room will only be some 9ft wide and may mean it's hardly worth doing - not allowing the speakers to be that far apart ......

Comprend?
 

Henley

Well-known member
Nov 26, 2007
1
0
18,520
When I converted a room at home into a cinema we used 4 inch cladding covered with soundblock plasterboard on all 4 walls (over the iriginal brick and plaster) and ceiling. Although it helps, there is still far too much noise pollution to the rest of the house. I'd suggest using 8 inches of cladding but it certainly reduces the size of the room!
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
I'm hoping that some of the sound-proofing plasterboard offerings are more efficient than that!!

Will need some careful shopping around i guess ......
 

Craig M.

New member
Mar 20, 2008
127
0
0
from the bits i read, i think he was saying that unless the angles were extreme it wouldn't alter the sound but might make room treatment a bit trickier.
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
Interesting thought - I've contacted them for info - they do a sound proof music room, so wait to see prices !?

Only problem I guess is having to always walk up the garden to use such a room and wondering on what planing permission may be required.......

Worth looking in to though thanks!
 

ianswells

New member
Nov 15, 2008
1
0
0
Hi there,

In a similar situation re:garage to home theatre room. I haven't yet but intend to put a home theatre system in the room but not sure what size system I should I be aiming at purchasing. The room is 5.75 m x 3.25m x 2.75m. Is this considered a small room , medium or what? Would the B&W 685 of speaker package be too big small.

Alternatively I love music so maybe I should just get a bloody good stereo. Thoughts and comments please.

Cheers

Ian
 

MattSPL

New member
Jan 4, 2010
19
0
0
Ive been looking into sound proofing myself and to do it properly you need to build a room within a room.

Basically build stud walls 30 to 40cm inside the existing walls to create an air gap and use 6inch thick rock wool or similar to line the stud wall, then you can also add a membrane of deadening sheet followed by double slab. You will also need to do similar with the roof.

It can be done on the cheap if you do the work yourself.

Check youtube for video's
 

ASK THE COMMUNITY

TRENDING THREADS

Latest posts