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Question Continental and regional differences

AJM1981

Well-known member
Mar 26, 2021
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When given products in general, we can find taste preferences per continent or even per country and region as some products thrive somewhere that don't really do well elsewhere.

As the internet with its online shops sprouted things probably got spread out a little more even though some general difference in preference remains.

An American vlogger once mentioned in a side note that Americans preferred a subwoofer to almost every stereo system where Europeans would prefer to go without one.

I would like to add that Americans kind of seem to prefer design on steroids where mid century modern design for furniture seems to have become the standard of the European market in which speaker design connects to that.

What different things do you notice continental or regional?
 

AJM1981

Well-known member
Mar 26, 2021
131
33
120
I believe realism requires power and even if the mains go down to 20Hz a subwoofer should still be incorporated because in my experience a subwoofer can inject power into and energise a system like no other component can.

A subwoofer is the most important component.
Can't agree more, there is a recent discussion topic about it in which the conclusion on both the pro and cons sides was 'it depends'.

But apart from the discussion or reasons why a system should or shouldn't have one it seems a bit of a tradition too. If you take generations that grew up without internet versus ones that did you might find more pro-sub supporters for music in the US than in Europe. I remember some friends here in Holland who were into hifi and to whom a sub for music at home was not even a talking point, it was just a no go. They only used it in cars and for movies. Music that they played at home should always be without.

I guess the reason in difference is that American consumers got exposed to subs earlier on. In Europe they were a bit of an oddity for audio. The only time I saw them in larger numbers was when these PC speaker systems got onto the market.

It might also not have helped that early active subs sold on European markets didn't have cut-off options, just an on/off switch and volume. That made them well for music on tiny bookshelf speakers and as instant atmosphere with movies. But nothing else really. There are external devices that add cut off options along with other settings to connect between the sub and the amp, but they totally didn't catch on here in Europe in the old days.
 
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