Why the death of Blu-ray is very bad for gamers

Freddy

Well-known member
May 18, 2022
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Blu-ray sales have nosedived and the lack of interest in the format isn't just bad news for movie enthusiasts.

Why the death of Blu-ray is very bad for gamers : Read more
I only buy music Blu-rays which I can watch on YouTube for free! Rarely purchase 4K Blu-rays and the ones I do I don’t end up watching. Music DVDs still watch on YouTube for free! Movies come on Sky for free there is no need for them any more on discs. Gaming I don’t like. The Xbox Series S is download only so to is PS5 non disc option.
 

djh1697

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Nov 27, 2008
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The original Laserdisc was first demonstrated by Philips and MCA back in 1972. The optical disk has been with us for over 50 years in various formats, longer than the compact cassette. The LP record in its current format is almost 80 years old.
 

Bloke

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Apr 4, 2022
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Agreed...'last gasp' or 'terminal decline' is more accurate. 🙂 This all stems from the greedy pricing of 4K blurays when they were released...it turned many from the format...(myself included).
Absolutely agree it was the high prices. Even today, 1080 is fine for most, so to update your entire collection to 4k (as many did with the jump from DVD to Blu-ray) seemed like a faff.
 
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It's going to end up a niche market at higher resolutions, I think. I'm going to replace my favourites with 4k discs as and when they are available - but I won't be paying the £30-40 asked for first release 'posh' editions. Not a chance.
 

Minimalist82

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Aug 15, 2022
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I think the main point of the article is accurate around how the days of physical media for games are numbered. But the author has failed to mention all of the options available for purchasing games and how this is evolving. It may be true that to purchase a stand alone game digitally can be high. But subscription services available on all of the platforms make things a little more nuanced. Microsoft currently offer Game Pass, with a huge and overgrowing catalog of games available to Xbox & PC subscribers. Sony have the PS Plus service which is along similar lines. There is also the Steam service for PC users which in general offers reasonable pricing for the purchase of stand alone games.

The digital stores of the platform holders also offer customers access to a huge array of indie games and titles that may never have seen a physical release at very reasonable prices and I think this is very good for the consumer. It is also very good for the diversity and future development of the market. While ever the games market was purely based on physical formats, many smaller or indie developers just wouldn't have been able to get a publishing deal, meaning less choice for the consumer.

I definitely agree on the point that the move to digital will impact the second hand market and this is a shame. It also affects the more niche world of collectors. It is also true that with the above mentioned digital options, we never truly own the game which doesn't sit well with many people.

I guess we have to hope that with this inevitable move away from physical formats that the platform holders and publishers are continually challenged by bodies such as the Competition Commission and indeed consumers themselves in order to keep the costs fair and sustainable.
 

Bloke

Well-known member
BANNED
Apr 4, 2022
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I think the main point of the article is accurate around how the days of physical media for games are numbered. But the author has failed to mention all of the options available for purchasing games and how this is evolving. It may be true that to purchase a stand alone game digitally can be high. But subscription services available on all of the platforms make things a little more nuanced. Microsoft currently offer Game Pass, with a huge and overgrowing catalog of games available to Xbox & PC subscribers. Sony have the PS Plus service which is along similar lines. There is also the Steam service for PC users which in general offers reasonable pricing for the purchase of stand alone games.

The digital stores of the platform holders also offer customers access to a huge array of indie games and titles that may never have seen a physical release at very reasonable prices and I think this is very good for the consumer. It is also very good for the diversity and future development of the market. While ever the games market was purely based on physical formats, many smaller or indie developers just wouldn't have been able to get a publishing deal, meaning less choice for the consumer.

I definitely agree on the point that the move to digital will impact the second hand market and this is a shame. It also affects the more niche world of collectors. It is also true that with the above mentioned digital options, we never truly own the game which doesn't sit well with many people.

I guess we have to hope that with this inevitable move away from physical formats that the platform holders and publishers are continually challenged by bodies such as the Competition Commission and indeed consumers themselves in order to keep the costs fair and sustainable.
Indeed.
 

Friesiansam

Well-known member
I guess we have to hope that with this inevitable move away from physical formats that the platform holders and publishers are continually challenged by bodies such as the Competition Commission and indeed consumers themselves in order to keep the costs fair and sustainable.
I'm sure AAA game prices will only get higher. Either wait for prices of such games to drop before buying, rather than buying at or near release date or, go for the indie games that are always cheaper. BTW. PC games are often cheaper than console games.
 

Iradj

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Aug 17, 2022
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Can I just add that the demise of Blu-Ray would also be horrendous news for Hi-res/ surround music enthusiasts like me. In the past few years I have collected fantastic Blu-Ray recordings by labels such as 2L, as well as extensive Hi-res remastered music collections from Universal Music's back catalogue, and I am terrified of the prospect of not being able to find a deck to play them. Let's hope the format survives at least in the form of a niche market.
 

ukray2022

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Jul 28, 2022
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Death of Blu-ray? Well I like the big operas and classical music in general, sci fi and science proper, plus classic films.
All still available in Blu-ray and fantastic quality in sound and vision
But my point is this. Vinyl - long dead? Nope, big recovery including the record deck industry, with some eye watering prices! Valve amps dead, hardly, big renaissance in that area with again prices I can't afford.
The REAL problem is the labs, the people who invent, and sell new equipment. The hi fi media, magazines and websites then join in with the feeding frenzy and tell us buy, buy, buy.
I use a well known online seller of classical music and of late more and more recordings are downloads. In order to follow this latest tend it would mean expensive purchases of new equipment.
But I have 33 1/3 rpm vinyl, CD's with DVD recordings of big operas etc.
But I also have some very rare and good quality 78's not transferred to a modern media. What do I do, throw them away?
It's time the end user told the development companies that enough is enough.
 

Tinman1952

Well-known member
May 19, 2021
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Can I just add that the demise of Blu-Ray would also be horrendous news for Hi-res/ surround music enthusiasts like me. In the past few years I have collected fantastic Blu-Ray recordings by labels such as 2L, as well as extensive Hi-res remastered music collections from Universal Music's back catalogue, and I am terrified of the prospect of not being able to find a deck to play them. Let's hope the format survives at least in the form of a niche market.
I used to have loads of HD-DVDs and quite an expensive player...and look what happened to that format! Just saying.....
 

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