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What do YOU do with your CDs?

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The_Lhc

New member
Oct 16, 2008
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chebby said:
The_Lhc said:
omnibeard said:
Would something like the itunes match service negate this? I haven't really looked into it, but won't they give you high quality mp3s of any mp3s on your hard drive, and store them in the cloud? Once that was done, would they be giving you a license to that music, or would you still need to own the CD?
I don't use iTunes, so I'm basing this reply on zero knowledge but I would have thought that iTunes Match would only match tracks that you've actually bought through iTunes, rather than stuff you've ripped yourself.

I might be wrong but I'd be surprised if your suggestion was the case.
http://www.apple.com/uk/itunes/itunes-match/

It stores music you've ripped yourself too.
But does it improve the quality? Must admit I'm surprised, I wouldn't have thought it would be in Apple's interest to provide a copy of a track that can't be shown to have been legally purchased.
 

chebby

Well-known member
Jun 2, 2008
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The_Lhc said:
But does it improve the quality?
That isn't what was asked. It;'s only improved if your original was less than 256K AAC VBR.

The_Lhc said:
Must admit I'm surprised, I wouldn't have thought it would be in Apple's interest to provide a copy of a track that can't be shown to have been legally purchased.
Not only that, but they find out who the artist is and pay royalties on it (even though you might have originally uploaded it free).
 

VoodooDoctor

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Sep 23, 2007
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Jumping Jack said:
I rip them to my NAS, put them in "fleecepacks" (very very handy product, http://www.fleecepack.nl) and store them. I only use them to play in my car now...
Those look like a great idea. I've ordered some. I see some dull evenings coming up!
 

The_Lhc

New member
Oct 16, 2008
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chebby said:
The_Lhc said:
Must admit I'm surprised, I wouldn't have thought it would be in Apple's interest to provide a copy of a track that can't be shown to have been legally purchased.
Not only that, but they find out who the artist is and pay royalties on it (even though you might have originally uploaded it free).
Ah, I'd forgotten you have to pay for Match, that makes more sense.
 

gel

Moderator
George680 said:
Myself I love my cd collection. At home I only play cds in my hifi! :bounce:

I'm very curious, what do YOU do with your cds?

Do you use them in your cd player? Or do you have them stored in your rack only?

And will you keep them? Or are you planning to sell?
Not a lot.
I only own a few - like 5 at present of which I have ripped on my laptop and then listen to occasionally.
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
The_Lhc said:
chebby said:
The_Lhc said:
Must admit I'm surprised, I wouldn't have thought it would be in Apple's interest to provide a copy of a track that can't be shown to have been legally purchased.
Not only that, but they find out who the artist is and pay royalties on it (even though you might have originally uploaded it free).
Ah, I'd forgotten you have to pay for Match, that makes more sense.
iTunes Match is ingenious, there are billions of illegal mps's out there and Apple came up with a way of monetising them. Just think if there are perhaps 100 million iTunes match users, each paying £22 then that's £2.2bn of revenue from mps that people already had and would otherwise have earnt no revenue for the record lables.

Then you have the people who have bought legally and ripped themselves, then later pay for iTunes Match for the convenience and protection it provides, Apple just monetised a paid for collection again.

Yet considering all of this, its still a fantastic deal for users! :-D
 

omnibeard

New member
Dec 7, 2010
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Also looked like it was some kind of amnesty for people who might have acquired mp3s in not such a legal manner.
 

Al ears

Moderator
omnibeard said:
Also looked like it was some kind of amnesty for people who might have acquired mp3s in not such a legal manner.
Quite possibly but I cannot for the life of me see why anybody would want to pay Apple for a collection they already own, whether gained illegally or not.

Its not as if the replacement track from Apple is at a particularly high standard of recording either!

Am I missing the point somewhere? I don't think I'll ever be able to get a job with Apple!
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
My cd's are in both of my green apple cd racks and i take them out to play & put them back when i'm done..simples!
 

WishTree

Well-known member
May 18, 2010
107
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The_Lhc said:
No, you are not legally allowed to do that. Paying for the CD gives you a license to use the music for your own pleasure, if you no longer own the CD you no longer have that license, so you cannot keep any copy of the music contained on the CD.
I thought that the British Legal system is even more strict / silly.

I am not legally allowed to rip my CD to any other format even though I own the CD and did not sell it away. The logic being the license to listen to the music is offered only in the CD format and anything else (ripping, making a second copy just to have a back up etc) are all illegal.

I hope I am wrong but it would be nice to know what is the actual copyright in case of CDs.
 

The_Lhc

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Oct 16, 2008
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WishTree said:
The_Lhc said:
No, you are not legally allowed to do that. Paying for the CD gives you a license to use the music for your own pleasure, if you no longer own the CD you no longer have that license, so you cannot keep any copy of the music contained on the CD.
I thought that the British Legal system is even more strict / silly.

I am not legally allowed to rip my CD to any other format even though I own the CD and did not sell it away. The logic being the license to listen to the music is offered only in the CD format and anything else (ripping, making a second copy just to have a back up etc) are all illegal.

I hope I am wrong but it would be nice to know what is the actual copyright in case of CDs.
That is actually the letter of the law, however the authorities have stated that will not prosecute anyone for ripping their own CDs and the government has stated that will change the law to allow this.
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
Ripped, backed up to external drive, put away - in alphabetical order in a pIece of furniture bought for the purpose

The copyright law is rather confusing - suppose I bought a CD for £10 then sold on to a friend for £10, he would own the CD without having contributed to the royalties etc. though the royalties etc., had been paid at one point Then if he were to freely give the CD to another person, they too would 'own' the CD with zero contribution to royalties etc., yet still by dint of ownership possess the licence to play it.similarly if I paid for a downloaded mp3 and gave it away.

I can't see how they will ever be able to enforce illegal copying, ptp sharing etc., it's a bit of a minefield.
 

omnibeard

New member
Dec 7, 2010
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Nogsk said:
The copyright law is rather confusing - suppose I bought a CD for £10 then sold on to a friend for £10, he would own the CD without having contributed to the royalties etc. though the royalties etc., had been paid at one point Then if he were to freely give the CD to another person, they too would 'own' the CD with zero contribution to royalties etc., yet still by dint of ownership possess the licence to play it.similarly if I paid for a downloaded mp3 and gave it away.

I can't see how they will ever be able to enforce illegal copying, ptp sharing etc., it's a bit of a minefield.
It does all seem a bit mental. It doesn't feel to me to be morally wrong, having contributed so much to the record industry/independent record shops/amazon etc over the years, to flog on a CD having ripped it (although I stress that this is not my intention anyway as I love my collection and would always keep everything as the ultimate backup).

The laws were put in place many years ago at a time of no ripping. There are interesting (!) stats around about how much more money people who illegally download music spend on legitimate music. I've always found in the past that downloading (illegally) one album by a band would generally make me go out and buy everything that band had ever done. I tend to use Spotify, Grooveshark, last.fm as the gateway to new music now instead.
 

omnibeard

New member
Dec 7, 2010
27
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Alears said:
omnibeard said:
Also looked like it was some kind of amnesty for people who might have acquired mp3s in not such a legal manner.
Quite possibly but I cannot for the life of me see why anybody would want to pay Apple for a collection they already own, whether gained illegally or not.

Its not as if the replacement track from Apple is at a particularly high standard of recording either!

Am I missing the point somewhere? I don't think I'll ever be able to get a job with Apple!
Yeah, I wouldn't do this myself but I can kind of see the appeal. Say you've obtained, some how, many gigs of mp3s on a hard drive at 128kbs, then it looks like you can "legitimise" that collection and have them upgraded to 256kbps (which to many peoples' ears is plenty high quality enough, but that's another issue!). This is providing that those tracks exist in the itunes catalogue. And of course you then have to pay Apple (a relatively small fee per year).

Then having that collection available to you where ever you go might be attractive to some people, but you could do something similar by opening up your own NAS with an external IP, password protection etc. In fact I think many NASs now provide a cloud service as part of the deal.

As pointed out by others, it's a bit win-win for Apple, but there is some value in the service for the end user, don't you think?
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
omnibeard said:
Nogsk said:
The copyright law is rather confusing - suppose I bought a CD for £10 then sold on to a friend for £10, he would own the CD without having contributed to the royalties etc. though the royalties etc., had been paid at one point Then if he were to freely give the CD to another person, they too would 'own' the CD with zero contribution to royalties etc., yet still by dint of ownership possess the licence to play it.similarly if I paid for a downloaded mp3 and gave it away.

I can't see how they will ever be able to enforce illegal copying, ptp sharing etc., it's a bit of a minefield.
It does all seem a bit mental. It doesn't feel to me to be morally wrong, having contributed so much to the record industry/independent record shops/amazon etc over the years, to flog on a CD having ripped it (although I stress that this is not my intention anyway as I love my collection and would always keep everything as the ultimate backup).

The laws were put in place many years ago at a time of no ripping. There are interesting (!) stats around about how much more money people who illegally download music spend on legitimate music. I've always found in the past that downloading (illegally) one album by a band would generally make me go out and buy everything that band had ever done. I tend to use Spotify, Grooveshark, last.fm as the gateway to new music now instead.
Agreed, I too over the years have spent a small fortune on vinyl/tape/CD. As a case in point I have DSOM on vinyl, twice, CD's - normal and anniversary box set - but I also have an SACD version given to me 'digitally' by a friend, so technically I could be prosecuted for listening to the version I didn't buy even though I have 4 versions I did buy!

In my case if say downloading/groovesharking has promoted me to purchase much more music than I might have otherwise not.

Never bought into the iTunes thing, much prefer the physicality of a record/cd, but I am old!
 

omnibeard

New member
Dec 7, 2010
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Totally agreed on the physicality of a record/cd thing - I've never bought a track off itunes, and I doubt I ever will. Maybe in case of emergency. What that emergency might be I'm finding difficult to imagine.
 

tino

Well-known member
Sep 29, 2011
135
10
18,595
CDs ripped in lossless format and stored in their original jewel cases on shelves should I ever wish to play in the car or lend out.

Music played at home is invariably from the ripped CD.

Music is backed up and format shifted for MP3 portable player.

No cloud storage or downloads for me although I'll use streaming services e.g. Spotify, Last.fm from time to time.

I always keep the original paid for CD (or vinyl) to be legal.
 

steve_1979

Well-known member
Jul 14, 2010
231
7
18,795
Xanderzdad said:
Although they were all ripped to my NAS they are still all filed away on my 'Billy' bookcases in the lounge.

I say 'were' because I damaged ALL my music files last week (I think I did something weird with 'Songbird'), and now I have to re rip all 22,000!
Oh no! That's awful. :cry:

Didn't you make a backup?
 

steve_1979

Well-known member
Jul 14, 2010
231
7
18,795
I've never actually listened to any of my CD's. I rip them straight away and always use the digital files for all of my listening.

The CD's themselves are lined up in alphabetical order on a shelf because it looks cool and I occasionally like to have a read of the cases.
 

Rethep

Well-known member
May 2, 2011
15
0
18,520
I ripped them to my Mac, gave away the jewel cases, and stored them, packed iin plastic sleeves, in boxes. I still have some 100 for sale (just as my CD-player), which i did not rip. So the rippingprocess was also a "cleanup" for my collection.
 

shooter

New member
May 4, 2008
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When the half cut wife has her mates round for cocktails and they get used as frizbees

:angry:
 

BenLaw

Well-known member
Nov 21, 2010
475
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18,895
steve_1979 said:
I've never actually listened to any of my CD's. I rip them straight away and always use the digital files for all of my listening.

The CD's themselves are lined up in alphabetical order on a shelf because it looks cool and I occasionally like to have a read of the cases.
Any of them?! :O

Did you not have any CDs prior to a HDD, streaming setup?
 

matthewpiano

Well-known member
Nov 23, 2007
395
206
19,270
Strange concept but I listen to them :grin:

I've got quite a few of them ripped in either FLAC or WAV format and I do use the Squeezebox, but most of my listening still takes place using a CD player. Consequently the vast majority of my CDs are out and ready to play. I do have a couple of boxes holding a total of about 500 discs that I don't tend to play mostly because they are things I no longer enjoy that much.
 

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