Technics turntables

plastic penguin

Well-known member
What they really like? Read so many conflicting reviews over the years.

A mate of mine had one about 25 years or so ago, playing through a JVC system and my old Wharfedale Linton speakers, and the only memories was the wonderful build quality.

Need a low-down on how they compare to modern turntables.

All comers welcome.
 

lindsayt

New member
Apr 8, 2011
16
2
0
Technics SP10 Mk2 or Mk3 with a good arm and cart is a really good tt. I'd take one of these over the vast majority of modern tt's.

Technics 1200 / 1210 with a good arm and cart is a genuinely good tt. With the standard arm and budget mm cart it's a poor sounding tt.
 
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Anonymous

Guest
Depends on the model although I know nothing of the earlier Technics. The SL1200 and straight from the box is a competent if a little bland and grey sounding. It can be bought up to very high standard with the addition of mods such as changing the useless tonearm and onboard power supply. Timestep offer just about the most comprehensive set of upgrades that will lift the SL1200 into the spheres of high end. Great thing about this is upgrades can be incremental as and when funds allow and theres an awful lot areas over the standard deck you can improve on. In terms of sound the SL1200 has excellent mid upper bass, even on the standard deck giving the music a sense of drive and propulsion (better than belt drives), fully modded it becomes tuneful as well. As a starting point its a great platform that seems to have as many upgrade path's as the Linn, in fact many Linn owners have sold their Sondecks preferring the sound of a highly modded Technics. I'm actually in the process of acquiring a SL1210 myself, I have an Audiomods arm ready for fitment.
 

plastic penguin

Well-known member
Can the TT be modded at any good retailer, or will it need to be sent to a specialist?

I'm looking for a decent upgrade to the Pro-ject, and it creates such static on the arm I have to wear rubber boots. However, given the TT is least used, I'm reluctant to spend fortunes on a component that's only used once a month, on average.

How much does it cost to mod a Technics? ballpark figure, of course, would be helpful.
 
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Anonymous

Guest
Having pretty much decided on a second hand Technics SL-1200 instead of a cheap turntable such as the Project Genie, I'm now confusing myself by looking at various Rega P3-24 and Planar 3's on a certain auction site. However, I like the robustness of the SL-1200 and the fact that I can upgrade slowly.
 
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Anonymous

Guest
Timestep/ Sound HiFI mods are generally changed by the owner but they can be sent away for fitment (additional cost). It seems two of the most cost effective areas for upgrading are changing the feet and cartridge but keeping the standard arm. Try google Technics Evo and the top 3 links will give you an idea of possibilities and cost. KAB also provide a series of mods with different pricing for the SL1200, again google is your friend.

Cartridge wise I'd go for the AT95E then try get hold of the Shibata stylus, will give a surprisingly rich and sophisticated sound for not too much money. I used to have one in my Orbe and a stylus really can make that much difference.
 
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Anonymous

Guest
The SL-1200 I am looking at just needs a new stylus, would you recommend just replacing the whole cartridge with a AT95E?
 
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Anonymous

Guest
Depends on what the cartridge is, if its one of the Ortofon DJ carts (Concord nose) which is the usual partner for the SL1200 then I'd replace it as it will always limit the sound. What is already fitted to the deck?

The AT95E is the minimum I'd recommend for decent cartridges, in the standard E form its also pretty cheap. Great thing is you can upgrade the stylus to a HE (Hyper Elliptical) or the Shibata (Diamond on lightweight cantilever) if you prefer. The jump in sound quality is out of proportion to the cost with the little AT95, as long as you don't listen to any densely layered classical you won't be disappointed.
 

proffski

New member
Dec 11, 2008
27
0
0
lindsayt said:
Technics SP10 Mk2 or Mk3 with a good arm and cart is a really good tt. I'd take one of these over the vast majority of modern tt's. Technics 1200 / 1210 with a good arm and cart is a genuinely good tt. With the standard arm and budget mm cart it's a poor sounding tt.
Absolutely! These are magnificent instruments and built like precision laboratory hardware.

I could never understand as to why the "Disco Type" Technics turntables are better known.

The SP10s as you rightly point out are truly a reference standard works of art, way ahead of the other Technics offerings! :)
 
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Anonymous

Guest
Brilliant. thanks a lot for the advice. The cartidge fitted is a Numark but not sure what model yet.
 
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Anonymous

Guest
andre.p said:
Brilliant. thanks a lot for the advice. The cartidge fitted is a Numark but not sure what model yet.
Its a DJ brand mean't for scratching so replace it, Numark never set the (Hi Fi) cartridge world alight.
 
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Anonymous

Guest
Hi, I have had a Technics SLD-3 turntable since 1981 and it has never sounded better. I have just fitted a new Sorbothane platter mat and Sorbothane feet to my deck.

Pity I damaged my stylus whilst fitting the feet. :oops: The stylus was from a Goldring 2200 cartridge, does anyone know if I could fit a better stylus to the cartridge. I have recently bought a second hand Trichord Dino phonostage and I am rediscovering my old vinyl.

I was thinking this may be an excuse to upgrade to a Goldring 2500. Does anybody know if it will fit the cartridge for the Goldring 2200. I was hoping that because they are from the 2000 series that they may be interchangeable.

I hope I am not hijacking your thread but I thought I would mention a feature I find useful is that because of the easy headshell changing I have 2 headshells and cartridges. I have a cheaper but very decent Audio Technica headshell that I can use on records I am not sure of for condition. I had the Goldring for the best condition vinyl.

regards stasis
 

chebby

Well-known member
Jun 2, 2008
1,246
14
19,195
plastic penguin said:
So if I purchase one of the Technics, say the SP10, how compatible would it be with my ClearAudio cartridge?
Careful. The box alone can cost £325 !! (Ok, you get the manual too.)

You will need a plinth. (Not an original)

And, of course, the turntable.

The 'SP10' is only the turntable unit. The SL1000 (complete package) consists of...

SP-10 (Motor drive)

SH-10E (Outboard power Supply)

SH-10 B3 (Original obsidian base)

EPA-100 (Tonearm)

SH-10R (Remote control)
 

plastic penguin

Well-known member
chebby said:
plastic penguin said:
So if I purchase one of the Technics, say the SP10, how compatible would it be with my ClearAudio cartridge?
Careful. The box alone can cost £325 !! (Ok, you get the manual too.)

You will need a plinth. (Not an original)

And, of course, the turntable.

The 'SP10' is only the turntable unit. The SL1000 (complete package) consists of...

SP-10 (Motor drive)

SH-10E (Outboard power Supply)

SH-10 B3 (Original obsidian base)

EPA-100 (Tonearm)

SH-10R (Remote control)
Okay - wasn't aware, just assumed it was the 'full monty'.

Think I'll just buy a new pair of wellies.

Ta, Chebby
 

lindsayt

New member
Apr 8, 2011
16
2
0
You could off course buy an SP10 which has already been owned by a hi-fi enthusiast who has already fitted a plinth and arm to it.

Buying a 1210 and then modding it to high heaven is one option. Great for the hobbyist. Trouble is, by the time you add up the price of all the mods it can take you past the price of an EMT 950 or Pioneer P3 / P3a Exclusive, without taking you past the performance of them. One big advantage of the 1210 is that there are so many of them around making them cheap to repair or replace if they ever go wrong.

Almost every Japanese manufacturer had a statement direct drive turntable in the 1970's and early '80's. There are plenty of worthy alternatives to the Technics.
 
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Anonymous

Guest
lindsayt said:
Buying a 1210 and then modding it to high heaven is one option. Great for the hobbyist. Trouble is, by the time you add up the price of all the mods it can take you past the price of an EMT 950 or Pioneer P3 / P3a Exclusive, without taking you past the performance of them. One big advantage of the 1210 is that there are so many of them around making them cheap to repair or replace if they ever go wrong.
Surely without ever hearing a fully upgraded deck this is an assumption?
 

lindsayt

New member
Apr 8, 2011
16
2
0
There's no definitive fully upgraded 1210 as there are different paths and different arms and cartridges that one can go down. I have heard a £4000 plus 1210 record playing solution.
 
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Anonymous

Guest
lindsayt said:
There's no definitive fully upgraded 1210 as there are different paths and different arms and cartridges that one can go down. I have heard a £4000 plus 1210 record playing solution.
Actually there is a definitive package and its been highly reviewed and praised by none other than David Price.
 
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Anonymous

Guest
I understand your prejudice, but its healthy to keep an open mind on these things. His conclusion was that the fundamentals of the SL1200 where excellent, and in many ways (dynamics, speed, pitch stability) superior to most modern belt drives such as my Orbe. By replacing the arm, using an off board power supply, and fitting a decent cartridge you remove the DJ part of the Technics DNA from the deck and take away that dark cloudy closed in sound the standard deck has. Although originally the SL1200 was conceived as a Hi Fidelity record player in the early 70's, it was the rugged construction plus quick start-up that meant it was widely adopted as a Saturday night spinner. Get past these associations and you actually have the fine basis of a decent (and highly upgradable) sounding record player.

:)
 

nopiano

Well-known member
stasis said:
Hi, I have had a Technics SLD-3 turntable since 1981 and it has never sounded better. I have just fitted a new Sorbothane platter mat and Sorbothane feet to my deck.

Pity I damaged my stylus whilst fitting the feet. :oops: The stylus was from a Goldring 2200 cartridge, does anyone know if I could fit a better stylus to the cartridge. I have recently bought a second hand Trichord Dino phonostage and I am rediscovering my old vinyl.

I was thinking this may be an excuse to upgrade to a Goldring 2500. Does anybody know if it will fit the cartridge for the Goldring 2200. I was hoping that because they are from the 2000 series that they may be interchangeable.
They are, but not quite what you might imagine. A similar question elsewhere elicited this explanation:

Just got an email reply back from a technical guy at goldring.

"Although the styli are interchangeable, the 2400 and 2500 cartridges use metal bodies and therefore give higher performance which you will miss if fitting the 2400/2500 styli to the 2200 plastic body."

I hope that helps.

Welcome to the forum!
 

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