Suggestions re the purchase and use of headphones, either in-ear of over-ear when using hearing aides

SnapperDave

Active member
Feb 12, 2021
3
3
25
I am in my late 70s and suffer from hearing loss.I would like to purchase a pair of either in- ear pods of over ear headphones. I am unsure whether they ought to be used whilst using my hearing aides, or how to decide which kind to go for. I am using NHS aides that sit above the ear but wonder whether to consider privately sold ones that claim to be more efficient and also sit inside the ear.
Another option that I have considered is the software that can be used in conjunction with mobile phones. I believe that such software is installed on the phone and sends a signal via blue tooth to the headphone and that adjustments can be made on the phone.
I also wonder whether reviews on all pieces of Hi Fi kit are carried out by listeners who are confident that their hearing is still up to the mark. I wonder whether any reviewers regularly have their hearing checked out to ensure that their reviews are accurate.
I would be very interested in anyone's thoughts please. Thank you
 

Gray

Well-known member
I also wonder whether reviews on all pieces of Hi Fi kit are carried out by listeners who are confident that their hearing is still up to the mark. I wonder whether any reviewers regularly have their hearing checked out to ensure that their reviews are accurate.
I've often wondered that Dave. I think many reviewers (and punters alike) might be quite shocked at the results of a thorough test.
Even the difference between L & R ears on most people, would probably make a mockery of drive units being matched to within 1dB between channels, for example.

My first thought would be that replacing aids with IEMs for music listening seems like the logical thing to do (because the sound wouldn't go via the aid).
But I think those 'in the ear' type hearing aids should work well with over ear phones.
Because when initially fitting them, they tune those digital aids to compensate for your missing frequencies don't they?
In other words, they become your ears. You'd get used to the equalised sound - so wouldn't want to take them out to listen to music.
You could try over-ear headphones with your current aids, but there might be a physical obstruction.....although deep, soft pads might accommodate the above ear part of the aid nicely.
 
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Roger_A

Well-known member
Mar 31, 2010
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18,545
I think Gray's comments on your problem are very pertinent, especially about the aids being adjusted for your particular hearing loss. If you just use standard IEMs then you will lose that adjustment which may or may not be acceptable depending on the extent of correction (usually but not always to account for loss in upper frequencies). If you decide to go for in ear hearing aids (which you'd have to pay for privately) then, as Gray says, you could use over ear headphones. In addition if going this way then many of these type of aids will also work with Bluetooth, if you make sure you check this when ordering them, and that would enable you to use this method with your phone or a Bluetooth transmitter connected to your hifi.

If you stick with your present over ear aids then I think only full over ear headphones, with as large an earpiece as possible would work effectively. You could also contact your local hospital audiology department where you got your NHS aids from as they are very helpful and can give advice and possibly send you details of possible courses of action. If you see an audiologist about private aids then he/she should be well aware of this sort of problem and be able to give advice. Note that some phones (I believe iPhones but not sure about particular Android phones) will work with the 'T' setting on your standard NHS aids which might be worth trying.
 

SnapperDave

Active member
Feb 12, 2021
3
3
25
I am in my late 70s and suffer from hearing loss.I would like to purchase a pair of either in- ear pods of over ear headphones. I am unsure whether they ought to be used whilst using my hearing aides, or how to decide which kind to go for. I am using NHS aides that sit above the ear but wonder whether to consider privately sold ones that claim to be more efficient and also sit inside the ear.
Another option that I have considered is the software that can be used in conjunction with mobile phones. I believe that such software is installed on the phone and sends a signal via blue tooth to the headphone and that adjustments can be made on the phone.
I also wonder whether reviews on all pieces of Hi Fi kit are carried out by listeners who are confident that their hearing is still up to the mark. I wonder whether any reviewers regularly have their hearing checked out to ensure that their reviews are accurate.
I would be very interested in anyone's thoughts please. Thank you
I think Gray's comments on your problem are very pertinent, especially about the aids being adjusted for your particular hearing loss. If you just use standard IEMs then you will lose that adjustment which may or may not be acceptable depending on the extent of correction (usually but not always to account for loss in upper frequencies). If you decide to go for in ear hearing aids (which you'd have to pay for privately) then, as Gray says, you could use over ear headphones. In addition if going this way then many of these type of aids will also work with Bluetooth, if you make sure you check this when ordering them, and that would enable you to use this method with your phone or a Bluetooth transmitter connected to your hifi.

If you stick with your present over ear aids then I think only full over ear headphones, with as large an earpiece as possible would work effectively. You could also contact your local hospital audiology department where you got your NHS aids from as they are very helpful and can give advice and possibly send you details of possible courses of action. If you see an audiologist about private aids then he/she should be well aware of this sort of problem and be able to give advice. Note that some phones (I believe iPhones but not sure about particular Android phones) will work with the 'T' setting on your standard NHS aids which might be worth trying.
Hi Chaps
I very much appreciate the replies from Grey and Roger A. They provide relevant considerations. I believe that the deterioration of hearing and eyesight are matters that many people only gradually become aware of after it has actually started. Correction of eyesight to what it originally should be is more easily remedied but hearing aides cannot return the hearing to what it should have been. However, as suggested, an enquiry from my hearing aide providers might well be useful.
Thanks to you both
Dave
 
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