some advice please

admin_exported

New member
Aug 10, 2019
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evenin all

I've recently come into the possession of a vinyl collection of around 120 LP's and singles from the mid sixty's onwards . stones, beatles, hendrix pink floyd etc, all original pressings. Now first I thought EBAY! but to be honest I wouldn't mind playing them and i'm looking to buy a turntable and see if vinyl is superior to CD - plus it's a seriously cool collection
Now not being totally clued up on this and not having endless amounts of cash i've had a look and found this

http://www.richersounds.com/product/turntables/project/essential/proj-essential-blk

any good? and do i need anything else to plug it into my av reciever?

or can anyone suggest alternatives?

help greatly appreciated
 

The_Lhc

New member
Oct 16, 2008
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Depends on the amp, that TT doesn't have a phono stage, so if the amp doesn't have one you'll need to get one.
 

John Duncan

Well-known member
Jan 8, 2008
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But to answer the question...;)

Not the last word in fidelity, but great fun. Personally I'd get a Genie 3 because it's cooler:



But it's a little more expensive. Whichever you choose, get a Knosti Disco Antistat to clean the records, it will transform them (though appears to be going for stupid prices at the moment).
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
Hi Shatwell,

Not sure if this helps, but I have a Pro-Ject Debut II from 2002 Era, and a Marantz 4001 amp. I can safely say that my TT easily matches my CD player (Marantz cd5001), and in some cases out performs it. The Pro-jects seems to make decent little budget TTs that have great sound at no cost! My TT cost about 150 quid back in 2002 seems their prices haven't changed much in almost 10 years.
 

Andrew Everard

New member
May 30, 2007
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shatwell said:
Onkyo TXSR309 and whats a phonostage?
Turntables output a much lower signal level than line devices such as CD players, and also their output needs some equalisation to restore the balance of the sound, which is altered slightly before it is put on records to compensate for the limitations of the record itself.

Due to this, a phono stage is required to step-up the signal before an amplifier can handle it, and perform the re-equalisation. Some amplifiers and receivers have this phono stage built-in – yours doesn't, so will require an external phono stage between the turntable and the receiver. You can buy a decent one for under £100.
 

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