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so much speaker and amp power for small rooms?

bubobubo

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Nov 9, 2016
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i live in a very small room is like a student room about 3 meters long 3 meters wide and i had never use the volume of any amp over the half volume. and i had try amps from 25 to 100 watt i had even a amp 120 watt and i almost could not rise the volume button.

i had hear read that amp with much power is good so the music is get clean without cliping the sound or something like that, but is that really nesesary to have so much watt power if you live in very small rooms i fell instead it should be recommendable to use a amp about 20 to 40 watt depending of the ohm and a speaker with high sensitive

ps. im a beguin english man
 

ID.

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Feb 22, 2010
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On most amps halfway would probably be full power and may already be clipping depending on the source and the volume of the recording.
 

muljao

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Jul 18, 2016
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Your English is perfectly understandable.

Some speakers require higher power than others to run well. The power of an amp isn't a linear spec. For example a 120 watt amp may less than twice as powerful as a 20 watt amp in usage.

Much better is to get an amp and speakers that work well together, often the numbers associated with the spec sheet are not as important as they first seem
 

Frank Harvey

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Jun 27, 2008
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In a room that size, the main thing to be careful of is to not get speakers that are too big for the room with regards to their bass output. Too much bass will just take over the room, and you'll be losing midrange and treble detail. I'm using speakers with 5" bass drivers and they're more than enough in a room a little bigger than yours.

As mentioned previously, it important to get an amp and speaker combination that works well together. Bear in mind they're only amplifying what you out into them.
 

drummerman

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Jan 18, 2008
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If you listen loud you either want very efficient speakers or a lot of watts (or both). Bear in mind that speakers are the single biggest distortion creators. A little cone flapping around can easily go into double digit percentage.

If you listen at low to medium volume, most amplifiers able to do 5 to 10 watts or so will do with average sensitivity speakers of 84 to 87db.

It's quite enlightening how subjectively loud even low powered amplifiers go.

Michaelson of Musical Fidelity states that you need at least 500 watt continuous to re-create something approaching realistic levels. I have heard single digit valve systems sounding unbelievably 'real'.
 

macdiddy

Well-known member
Sep 3, 2010
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with the last point drummerman says, I heard a 10 watt Audio Note amp belting out a "Rage against the machine" track at plenty high enough volume for me in a medium sized hotel room at a hifi show a few years ago.

*music2*

ps. the sound it made was awesome and I would have brought one on the spot, only problem is I didn't have £8000 in my pocket.
 

bubobubo

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Nov 9, 2016
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muljao said:
Your English is perfectly understandable.

Some speakers require higher power than others to run well. The power of an amp isn't a linear spec. For example a 120 watt amp may less than twice as powerful as a 20 watt amp in usage.

Much better is to get an amp and speakers that work well together, often the numbers associated with the spec sheet are not as important as they first seem
why do the industri dont make so much nowdays speakers that are lets say betwen 30 and 60 watt in 6 or 8 ohms? and with high sensitive that i belive is better for small rooms
 

bubobubo

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Nov 9, 2016
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davidf said:
In a room that size, the main thing to be careful of is to not get speakers that are too big for the room with regards to their bass output. Too much bass will just take over the room, and you'll be losing midrange and treble detail. I'm using speakers with 5" bass drivers and they're more than enough in a room a little bigger than yours.

As mentioned previously, it important to get an amp and speaker combination that works well together. Bear in mind they're only amplifying what you out into them.
this is where the problem is more, i had buy many speakers some are for small dont have bass some are big have to much bass so are big in bass drive (6 or 7) and sound great but the treble is not so good. maybe they should build stand mounter speakers like the old days liter bigger but that dont sound so much big special for small rooms
 

muljao

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Jul 18, 2016
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There is a tendency for lots of people to look at the numbers. Lots of speakers are 6 or 8 ohms, and just because they are rated 150 watts for example, the amp does not need to be anywhere near this, but bigger numbers look better.

Many speakers will recommend an amp of say 20 or 30 watts to their rated power. The numbers are often marketing
 

bubobubo

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Nov 9, 2016
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macdiddy said:
with the last point drummerman says, I heard a 10 watt Audio Note amp belting out a "Rage against the machine" track at plenty high enough volume for me in a medium sized hotel room at a hifi show a few years ago.

*music2*

ps. the sound it made was awesome and I would have brought one on the spot, only problem is I didn't have £8000 in my pocket.
i guess very good amps with so low watt are almost always spensive, i at least dont want to buy a amp more than 500 euro i have a limit of 1000 euro for both speakers and amps so if i buy amp in the future for 1000 euro then it must be a tube amp or a very good low watt amp but maybe the better option for money quality is to buy a active speaker with a amp but then i will miss the bass and treble buttoms and i just listen music with a usb memory via the bluray or via the computer
 

insider9

Well-known member
Sep 20, 2016
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Since you brought it up. Adam Audio A5x are active should be well within budget and come with ribbon tweeters :)

I have not heard them so can't comment on anything else other than their existence and the fact they should work well in your room. Just remember you need 2 or a bundle circa 700EUR. Possibly A7x around 1,000 EUR but not sure if for the size of the room you'd need them.
 

Brokenflame

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Oct 23, 2016
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There are a number of things to consider when choosing an amp for your speakers.

1. 100w amp from brand A is not identical to 100w from brand B.

2. To protect the tweeter against clipping (which you may not hear) higher wattage amps are desirable. You will hear clipping on the bass driver so no need to worry about the bass driver.

3. The type of music you listen to will determine how much headroom you need in the Amp. For instance if the music has a large dynamic range I.e very quiet violin followed by loud clashing drums and symbols, you need to increase the volume to hear the violin but don't want the amp to top out when the drums kickin. Classic, Dubstep and Rock tend to have larger dynamic ranges than pop. Also excitable bass heavy music tends to require extra reserves of power from the transformer and capacitors in the amplifier to avoid power dips, larger wattage amps have bigger capacitors and transformers.

4. How loud you want to listen to the music, is a factor. However, less of a factor than you would think. It might take your speakers a 40w amp to produce 80db of sound, but a 120w amp to produce 90db of sound. to increase the sound level requires a multiplier on the amplifier wattage.

5. Your speakers. Some speakers are more sensitive than others. The more sensitive your speakers are the less current they require to produce a loud sound. Also the placement of the speaker in the room can amplify bass notes. For instance placing your speakers 14cm from the corner of room will amplify the bass notes.

The impudence of the speaker will play a large role in the type of amplifier you can choose. I have 8ohm speakers dropping down to 3.8ohm. So I need an amp that is rated at 8ohm but is happy pushing 4ohm.

I have a friend who has 4ohm speakers, that drop down to less than 3ohm. So his amp requirement are different from mine. My amp would struggle with the low impedence for long periods of time.

6. Room type. There are a number of factors with regards to your room type, size, hardness and shape. Shape is the most difficult to deal with so most people don't bother (lots of complex maths). But size and hardness are fairly easy. The larger the room the more power is required to fill it, small rooms do not require as much power. On the other hand rooms with lots of soft furniture, carpet and other items that will absorb the sound waves sound making it sound quieter, thus you may want to increase the volume, which requires more power.

Summary:

For a set of bookshelf/stand mounted speaker you would probably be okay with a 40w/40w in 8 ohm 60w/60w into 6ohm for moderate listening volumes.
 

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