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plastic penguin

Well-known member
Apr 28, 2008
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Don't usually gravitate to the bass heavy stuff, but over the years I've collected a number of Raggae and SKA records and cds. So this evening I've dug out Exodus by Bob Marley & The Wailers (vinyl), and Prince Buster and the 'Very Best of Ska' (CD).

Haven't heard any of this for years and it sounds great, certainly a good test of how taut your system is.
 

davedotco

New member
Apr 24, 2013
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plastic penguin said:
Don't usually gravitate to the bass heavy stuff, but over the years I've collected a number of Raggae and SKA records and cds. So this evening I've dug out Exodus by Bob Marley & The Wailers (vinyl), and Prince Buster and the 'Very Best of Ska' (CD). Haven't heard any of this for years and it sounds great, certainly a good test of how taut your system is.
Been playing a bit of King Tubby of late, the 'King' album on Spotify is kinda mellow but great for late night listening, must be a remix or something, must go and look it up sometime.
 

MrReaper182

Well-known member
Apr 6, 2014
101
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I have always loved raggae and ska music and always will. I have lots of ska albums from the likes of The Selecter, The Ska-Dows, Judge Dread, Big 5, Bad Manners, and Prince Buster. I have all Bob Marley's albums and they all sound very nice on my system (as does all my ska albums). On the wall above my hi-fi system I have my Bob Marley poster flag. He is playing acoustic guitar in the picture.
 

Vladimir

New member
Dec 26, 2013
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Worth giving it a listen.

Monty Alexander

Harlem-Kingston Express Live!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OxZsdWIuQRs

 

margetti

New member
May 29, 2008
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One of those genre's of music that on the occassions I listen to, I think "I really should listen to more this".

Currently got Black Uhuru on....on next will be one of my favourite LP's when I'm in the mood for it - Scientist Rids the World of the Evil Curse of the Vampires
 

matt49

New member
Apr 7, 2013
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margetti said:
Currently got Black Uhuru on....
They're great. I particularly like 'Anthem', though the cognoscenti will consider it rather infra dig, as it's crossover. The 1984 UK remix is the one to go for: a harder edge than the US version.

A few random suggestions ...

I grew up on British reggae of the '70s and '80s. Misty in Roots are great: wonderfully melodic and well produced music. IMO their best is 'Earth', which sadly isn't on Spotify and can't be had on Amazon for reasonable money.



Another beautifully produced British reggae disk is Steel Pulse's much more mainstream 'Handsworth Revolution'.

I'm also partial to a bit of dancehall, and I really like the (again infra dig) singjay style of Barrington Levy. 'Here I Come' is great, though the compilation 'The Barrington Levy Collection' is probably the best bet.

And for something completely different, how about a bit of psychedelic dub from Jah Wobble and friends? African Head Charge, 'Off the Beaten Track'.



Matt
 

davedotco

New member
Apr 24, 2013
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matt49 said:
margetti said:
Currently got Black Uhuru on....
They're great. I particularly like 'Anthem', though the cognoscenti will consider it rather infra dig, as it's crossover. The 1984 UK remix is the one to go for: a harder edge than the US version.

A few random suggestions ...

I grew up on British reggae of the '70s and '80s. Misty in Roots are great: wonderfully melodic and well produced music. IMO their best is 'Earth', which sadly isn't on Spotify and can't be had on Amazon for reasonable money.



Another beautifully produced British reggae disk is Steel Pulse's much more mainstream 'Handsworth Revolution'.

I'm also partial to a bit of dancehall, and I really like the (again infra dig) singjay style of Barrington Levy. 'Here I Come' is great, though the compilation 'The Barrington Levy Collection' is probably the best bet.

And for something completely different, how about a bit of psychedelic dub from Jah Wobble and friends? African Head Charge, 'Off the Beaten Track'.



Matt
Matt, I never thought you had it in you, some serious sh!t there.

Back in the day I did some work for Island, often at Sarm, but more interestingly in the Fall Out Shelter, at the back of Islands main offices in St Peters Sq, Hammersmith. The shelter was a small studio used mainly for post production, but it was occasionally used to record.

On one occasion I was hired, along with my Linn Drum, an early LM2 still quite rare in the UK at that time, to 'replace' the drum tracks on a recording. The original drum sound was awful and out of tune, for the usual ganja related reasons.

We used the original drum tracks, suitably 'gated' to trigger the samples in the Linn Drum, which were plugged into separate channels of the mixer, then 'treated' and used in the final mix. This was kind of a secret, so I was not supposed to know who the band was.

This technique was shown to me by my engineer Mark, who actually used it live, for similar reasons, on a tour with Prince Far I and the Royal Rasses.

He also, on occasion did a few gigs with Misty, (pre 'roots') days, they were very much a 'collective' and chaotic on stage, often a dozen or more performers. He would also carry at least a couple of spare echo machines, usually Roland 'Space Echo' models. He was quite concerned that they would use so much echo at their gigs that they would seriously deplete the worlds supply and lead to a shortage......!
 

matt49

New member
Apr 7, 2013
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davedotco said:
Matt, I never thought you had it in you, some serious sh!t there.
Ah well, I'm not all Brahms and Springsteen, ya know.

davedotco said:
We used the original drum tracks, suitably 'gated' to trigger the samples in the Linn Drum, which were plugged into separate channels of the mixer, then 'treated' and used in the final mix. This was kind of a secret, so I was not supposed to know who the band was.
But did you know? And if so who was it?

davedotco said:
He also, on occasion did a few gigs with Misty, (pre 'roots') days, they were very much a 'collective' and chaotic on stage, often a dozen or more performers. He would also carry at least a couple of spare echo machines, usually Roland 'Space Echo' models. He was quite concerned that they would use so much echo at their gigs that they would seriously deplete the worlds supply and lead to a shortage......!
I only saw them once, in '84 I think. They were pretty magical: there was still something faintly disorganized about them, in a good way.
 

davedotco

New member
Apr 24, 2013
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matt49 said:
davedotco said:
Matt, I never thought you had it in you, some serious sh!t there.
Ah well, I'm not all Brahms and Springsteen, ya know.

davedotco said:
We used the original drum tracks, suitably 'gated' to trigger the samples in the Linn Drum, which were plugged into separate channels of the mixer, then 'treated' and used in the final mix. This was kind of a secret, so I was not supposed to know who the band was.
But did you know? And if so who was it?

davedotco said:
He also, on occasion did a few gigs with Misty, (pre 'roots') days, they were very much a 'collective' and chaotic on stage, often a dozen or more performers. He would also carry at least a couple of spare echo machines, usually Roland 'Space Echo' models. He was quite concerned that they would use so much echo at their gigs that they would seriously deplete the worlds supply and lead to a shortage......!
I only saw them once, in '84 I think. They were pretty magical: there was still something faintly disorganized about them, in a good way.
You do, on occasion give the impression of a slightly detached academic, a vision of a 'mad professor' at a Misty gig rather amuses me.

We saw them a lot in the mid/late 70s, we did a lot of Rock against Racism gigs for the BBC and was also heavily involved in the 'uprising' in Southall against the National Front that culminated in the death of Blair Peach, and a year or so later the Burning of the Hamborough Tavern. Bit of a political 'street fighting man' in those days.

I never knew the band at Island records, several names were bandied about, low key jamaican acts mainly, nothing that I can remember now.

By 1984 Misty had pared down to a core of 3 or 4, though if they were only 'faintly' chaotic, then it was a very good night.
 

matt49

New member
Apr 7, 2013
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davedotco said:
You do, on occasion give the impression of a slightly detached academic, a vision of a 'mad professor' at a Misty gig rather amuses me.
I was a mad student back then. I was also into the "world music" scene and bought quite a lot of West African music.

I don't know if that's your bag, Dave. If so, and as a fan of live recordings, you might like Toure Kunda's 'Live. Paris/Ziguinchor'. It's crossover stuff again, but hugely vibrant.

davedotco said:
By 1984 Misty had pared down to a core of 3 or 4, though if they were only 'faintly' chaotic, then it was a very good night.
There were certainly more than 3 or 4 on stage, though that might have been the effect of what I'd been inhaling.

It's a great shame that 'Earth' isn't widely available. Some of the tracks from it are on the compilation 'Roots Controller', but not the brilliant 'Own them, Control them':

"System own them / Babylon control them / System own them / Satanic power control them". Great stuff.
 

davedotco

New member
Apr 24, 2013
20
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matt49 said:
davedotco said:
You do, on occasion give the impression of a slightly detached academic, a vision of a 'mad professor' at a Misty gig rather amuses me.
I was a mad student back then. I was also into the "world music" scene and bought quite a lot of West African music.

I don't know if that's your bag, Dave. If so, and as a fan of live recordings, you might like Toure Kunda's 'Live. Paris/Ziguinchor'. It's crossover stuff again, but hugely vibrant.

davedotco said:
By 1984 Misty had pared down to a core of 3 or 4, though if they were only 'faintly' chaotic, then it was a very good night.
There were certainly more than 3 or 4 on stage, though that might have been the effect of what I'd been inhaling.

It's a great shame that 'Earth' isn't widely available. Some of the tracks from it are on the compilation 'Roots Controller', but not the brilliant 'Own them, Control them':

"System own them / Babylon control them / System own them / Satanic power control them". Great stuff.
Playing Toure Kunda now, promising.

I used to do a fair amount of Baba Maal and Salif Keita back in the nineties. saw them both live a couple of times.

The French-West African vibe is great, don't hear much these days, maybe I should go and live in Paris..... ;)

Mrs DDC would quite like that......... :?
 

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