Question New to the HDR game

twinkletoes

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Nov 16, 2021
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I was forced to buy a new Tv over the Christmas period, the old curved Samsung overheated and popped, anyhow I digress.

I pushed the boat out a little and bought a panny lz1500. nice nice.

The question. HDR is a lot different to what I'm used to regarding settings, specifically the luminance and contrast settings. the Panasonic has a "brightness" setting but it's a fine control of black depth and doesn't control how bright the screen is.

Now when the Dolby vision/hdr is selected the tv boosts everything to "11" and maxes out, Do people adjust these or do you leave them where they are?

I've read "you don't get the proper experience if these are adjusted" but surely that's the metadata controlling the look and you adjust the settings to the environment/to taste? is that correct?
 
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busb

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Most HDR content I watch on my LG55OLEDC24 is DolbyVision from Netflix, Prime etc. My set allows the TV to automatically set parameters when it detects such content - I leave those settings alone. The set also allows other HDR content to be adjusted. YMMV according to the particular set.
 

twinkletoes

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Nov 16, 2021
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Most HDR content I watch on my LG55OLEDC24 is DolbyVision from Netflix, Prime etc. My set allows the TV to automatically set parameters when it detects such content - I leave those settings alone. The set also allows other HDR content to be adjusted. YMMV according to the particular set.

Thanks for that! SO let me understand this correctly HDR as in static HDR (this is so confusing) you need to adjust slightly like normal SDR content but for dynamic content such as Dolby Vision just leave the setting as they are as you have suggested.

Thanks again
 

busb

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Thanks for that! SO let me understand this correctly HDR as in static HDR (this is so confusing) you need to adjust slightly like normal SDR content but for dynamic content such as Dolby Vision just leave the setting as they are as you have suggested.

Thanks again
That sounds correct. Dynamic changes frame to frame but I’m no expert on how static works, I guess it is set at the start of a program/film once or just relies on default settings that can be tweaked by the user. My overall picture setting is set to what LG calls Expert (daylight or night) mode.
 

twinkletoes

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The most accurate mode is usually done by selecting Moviemaker mode.

Bill

Thanks Bill, I have selected the "filmmaker" mode on the Panasonic sdr and static HDR content.

At this moment in time I'm not sure I even like the effect currently, i see why people like it, as people are attracted to "loud" imagery a trick we employ in graphic design. At this moment in time, a lot of HDR comes off as poor HDR photography from my general poke around.

The best implementation I've come across so far is the cabinet of curiosities and Maverick.

I certainly wouldn't watch run-of-mill tv shows in the future like love island in HDR, Netflix already have selling sunset in Dolby Vision and it's basically turning into a loudness war for tv, i can see it now.
 

twinkletoes

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Nov 16, 2021
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That sounds correct. Dynamic changes frame to frame but I’m no expert on how static works, I guess it is set at the start of a program/film once or just relies on default settings that can be tweaked by the user. My overall picture setting is set to what LG calls Expert (daylight or night) mode.

Thank you.
I have to feed the tv a particular signal but i can then adjust picture settings for each format SDR/HDR10/+/dolby vision/IQ all remembered separately from the other. Static HDR has the most user definable setting out of all the HDR formats on my set.

The only one i haven't a picture for is hdr10+ as i can find any content and my apple tv 2021 isn't able to do it as apple have software locked it.

As far as i understand it static HDR is reproduced perfectly on a 1000-nit tv of which mine just about is, but it still looks way too strong. ill play around maybe I should turn the light sensor on for HDR static.

i guess this is why dynamic content was invented
 

busb

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Jun 14, 2011
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Thank you.
I have to feed the tv a particular signal but i can then adjust picture settings for each format SDR/HDR10/+/dolby vision/IQ all remembered separately from the other. Static HDR has the most user definable setting out of all the HDR formats on my set.

The only one i haven't a picture for is hdr10+ as i can find any content and my apple tv 2021 isn't able to do it as apple have software locked it.

As far as i understand it static HDR is reproduced perfectly on a 1000-nit tv of which mine just about is, but it still looks way too strong. ill play around maybe I should turn the light sensor on for HDR static.

i guess this is why dynamic content was invented
At least HDR in the context of TV is genuine. I played around with HDR with stills photography almost 20yrs ago where I took 3 exp separated by 1 stop then combined in software - the overall DR was no greater but the compression algorithms was where it all happened.
 

twinkletoes

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There many videos on YouTube that should help you set it up, below is just one.

Bill


seen it, is completely useless beyond telling you to select "filmmaker" mode and telling you to turn off processing. Ill keep fiddling ill get there in the end. To be fair i have 2 films in static HDR the rest 300+ (god i need to stop buying films) are dolby vision

For the life of me, I dont know why auto-calibration hasn't been included in TVs yet, Ezio monitors have had it for years mine works like a charm every 200 hrs a little thing pops down. I generally believe it would be more of a game changer than HDR is currently is

thanks for your help though Bill much appreciated!
 

twinkletoes

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At least HDR in the context of TV is genuine. I played around with HDR with stills photography almost 20yrs ago where I took 3 exp separated by 1 stop then combined in software - the overall DR was no greater but the compression algorithms was where it all happened.

Sort of, no camera on earth has that sort of dynamic range not that consumers or pros can buy at this moment in time and it's certainly not native. "Genuine" is not a term id use for it, more "convincing" yes.

Even Arri have problems dissociating them ( cine and photo HDR), pretty much using the same terms just phrased differently.

HDR photography can now be done with one file , have been able to for years, the new fuji xh2s has 13-14 stops of dynamic range sony a7rv has, even more, using gradient maps and masks the effect is very convincing if you're into that sort of thing. I'm more into the "filmic" look.

Arri cini cams 17stops, still a fair cry from the 25-30 something stops of the human eye (though some argue its a lot less than that in certain situations). We are a long way off , that is something i certainly won't see in my lifetime.

but hey ho that's a different debate for another time.

I feel i have a firm grasp of the settings now so thank you for your help! top tip if you have a light sensor on your tv, use it for HDR static content it really does a good job of controlling the contrast and luminosity of the content.
 

busb

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Jun 14, 2011
82
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I use Nikon mirrorless cameras. I process the RAW files to 16bit tiff files then export to Photoshop directly or to PhotomatixPro for single RAW HDRs then Photoshop. The difference between 3x 1ev exposure HDRs or a single ones is minimal. Single HDRs don’t suffer from movement in clouds or branches etc.
 

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