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Question Hi-fi setup for home musician

stef

Member
Mar 19, 2020
4
0
20
Hello,

I am looking to buy my first hi-fi setup (amp and 2 speakers plus a sub, if necessary) that can nicely fill 40 m^2 at a moderate playing level. I live in Quebec, Canada.

I used to spend a lot of time listening to music on nearfield studio monitors in my studio. I've used a variety through the years (KRKs, Yamahas, Mackies) and learned to appreciate the precision and being able to get a sound that translated well to other systems.

In contrast, I have virtually no experience with hi-fi. Ideally, I would like to find a setup that works for pleasurable listening outside a surgical studio environment, but can also be revealing enough to function as a reference under proper conditions.

Is there such a thing? Or am I better off buying a hi-fi system *and* a pair of monitors?

Just as a single point of reference: I recently listened to a pair of Klipsch RP6000F plugged into a Yamaha RN602. It was not in my own space, but there were no surfaces for early reflections and I sat right at the sweet spot. I found the setup quite decent reference-wise. I could spend a bit more (say, up to US$3,000) in case there's a jump in quality right around the corner.

Any thoughts recommendations are appreciated.

Stef
 

chris661

Well-known member
Oct 30, 2019
191
119
270
Stef,

I'm one of those people that enjoys listening to studio monitors. In my opinion, they pack a lot of features that HiFi systems ought to include (switches for near-wall/corner placement, HF trim, etc) but don't.

I'd suggest that, first off, you take whichever monitors you like at the moment, and put them in the place the HiFi would go.
When you consider that the lowly Behringer B2031a monitors impressed the likes of Geddes and Linkwitz, IMO the rest of the HiFi world has a lot of catching up to do!

Chris
 

stef

Member
Mar 19, 2020
4
0
20
Thanks Chris.

Can you perhaps comment on any differences in the narrowness of the sweet spot between monitors and hi-fi speakers?

With some nearfield monitors, especially smaller 5" ones, I noticed that even when the sound is crisp at the sweet spot, there are noticeable artifacts when one listens to them off-axis.

Is it possible that hi-fi systems might be noticeably more forgiving with respect to listener position compared to monitors?
 

rainsoothe

Well-known member
Apr 30, 2012
639
279
19,270
Salut! If you're in Canada, I strongly suggest looking into an ex-dem or sh Simaudio Moon Neo Ace (maybe you find a good offer on one) + a pair of Dali Oberon 5 (or Golden Ear Triton series if they fit budget - or B&W 606 or Dynaudio Emit 20). Alternatively, Naim Atom with Focal Aria if they fit budget. Third proposition is Marantz PM7000 with said Dali Oberon 5. Of course, try to audition. But all these will beat Yamaha + Klipsch imo.
 

Romulus

Well-known member
Nov 21, 2014
110
48
10,620
When I read your specific HiFi experience and your needs, the speakers ATC seem to fit your requirements exactly. Look up their website for further details. They began masking studio monitors for professional studios and evolved in making speakers for consumers. The makers make their own speakers, own tweeters and have a cult following. They understand the 'studio' sound and the more relaxed sound for common living space (but still maintaining resolution virtues). The only slight caveat they need a slightly more powerful amp to drive their 'sealed' speakers, however there are some advantages using sealed speaker technology.
 

Jimboo

Well-known member
Oct 29, 2019
510
211
1,270
If sweet spot finding/ listening is important then Kef uni q speakers are to be auditioned. You really do not need to **** around with position or switches etc.
 

rainsoothe

Well-known member
Apr 30, 2012
639
279
19,270
When I read your specific HiFi experience and your needs, the speakers ATC seem to fit your requirements exactly. Look up their website for further details. They began masking studio monitors for professional studios and evolved in making speakers for consumers. The makers make their own speakers, own tweeters and have a cult following. They understand the 'studio' sound and the more relaxed sound for common living space (but still maintaining resolution virtues). The only slight caveat they need a slightly more powerful amp to drive their 'sealed' speakers, however there are some advantages using sealed speaker technology.
ATC is a great recommendation, and if op can stretch budget for those, it would be lovely. Bare in mind they require some juice (if going for the passive versions). Oh, and add Hegel H120 to my previous list.
 

stef

Member
Mar 19, 2020
4
0
20
Oh, and add Hegel H120 to my previous list.
Who doesn't want an amp that is named like a 19th century German idealist philosopher? A bit above my price range though.

I took a look at ATC prices. The only thing I could potentially afford is their lower-end active 3-way studio monitors (CAD$5500). That seems a bit much. If I'm going to go with expensive 3-way monitors for my living room, my choice would probably be the Dynaudio LYD 48s.

Will try to get my paws on those Dali Oberon 5s with a decent amp for an audition.
 

chris661

Well-known member
Oct 30, 2019
191
119
270
Thanks Chris.

Can you perhaps comment on any differences in the narrowness of the sweet spot between monitors and hi-fi speakers?

With some nearfield monitors, especially smaller 5" ones, I noticed that even when the sound is crisp at the sweet spot, there are noticeable artifacts when one listens to them off-axis.

Is it possible that hi-fi systems might be noticeably more forgiving with respect to listener position compared to monitors?
The directivity of a speaker is a function of the size of the cone producing the sound, and the wavelength of the sound being produced.
A larger speaker will be more directional than a smaller one, and will show directivity starting at a lower frequency. If you've ever moved your head around in front of a guitar amp, you'll know what I mean.

A good speaker will have a good on- and off-axis frequency response. Those that don't typically end up running the cone driver too high, which means you've got directivity that gradually narrows, and then suddenly gets very wide as the tweeter comes in.
8" 2-way designs typically suffer from that. IMO, an 8" cone should have a tweeter with directivity control via a horn or waveguide.

Chris
 
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nik70

Well-known member
Apr 18, 2015
9
1
4,525
Hello,

I am looking to buy my first hi-fi setup (amp and 2 speakers plus a sub, if necessary) that can nicely fill 40 m^2 at a moderate playing level. I live in Quebec, Canada.

I used to spend a lot of time listening to music on nearfield studio monitors in my studio. I've used a variety through the years (KRKs, Yamahas, Mackies) and learned to appreciate the precision and being able to get a sound that translated well to other systems.

In contrast, I have virtually no experience with hi-fi. Ideally, I would like to find a setup that works for pleasurable listening outside a surgical studio environment, but can also be revealing enough to function as a reference under proper conditions.

Is there such a thing? Or am I better off buying a hi-fi system *and* a pair of monitors?

Just as a single point of reference: I recently listened to a pair of Klipsch RP6000F plugged into a Yamaha RN602. It was not in my own space, but there were no surfaces for early reflections and I sat right at the sweet spot. I found the setup quite decent reference-wise. I could spend a bit more (say, up to US$3,000) in case there's a jump in quality right around the corner.

Any thoughts recommendations are appreciated.

Stef
TEAC AR-650 MKII integrated amplifier (120 W + 120 W rms on 4 ohm) (90 W + 90 W on 8 ohm)

(2 or 4 passive speakers) 3-way floor MAGNAT supreme 1002 monitor (180 W +180 W rms on 8 ohm) frequency response 19 - 40000 hz (92 db)

(or 2 or 4 passive speakers) from three-way stand indian-line dj 310 very powerful (160 W +160 W rms on 8 ohm) frequency response from 38-22000 hz (94 db)
 

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