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Bass i love it,i need it

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drummerman

New member
Jan 18, 2008
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davedotco said:
Vladimir said:
Well they are cheap and cheaply made. Unlike the metal case Gens these cabinets ring at ~200Hz like 1950s telephones. There's no free lunch. It's amazing how good budget actives sound considering they are made from decomposed garbage. 
To be fair, the cabinets on the Yamahas are not that bad, I can really only 'hear' them sounding off on the big HS8s, which is one of the main reasons I think the HS7 is a better bet for hi-fi use.

The other components are as good as they need to be, and no more.  Effectively built around cheap 'plate' amplifiers and drivers designed to do the specific job at hand, the proof is very much in the pudding.

Sold in huge numbers, well regarded in general, reliable and consistent, testiment to their design and entirely adequate build quality.

As I mentioned above, you can pay more for a basic 6.5 inch two way, such as 'The Rock' at £2.5k or the mass market but higher quality A7x at about £1k, technically all round better products, better sounding too, but in the pro world you get what you pay for rather more often than you do in hi-fi.
It seems you have heard just about every active speaker.

How come?
 

Vladimir

New member
Dec 26, 2013
220
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davedotco said:
Vladimir said:
Well they are cheap and cheaply made. Unlike the metal case Gens these cabinets ring at ~200Hz like 1950s telephones. There's no free lunch. It's amazing how good budget actives sound considering they are made from decomposed garbage.
To be fair, the cabinets on the Yamahas are not that bad, I can really only 'hear' them sounding off on the big HS8s, which is one of the main reasons I think the HS7 is a better bet for hi-fi use.
Every budget active sub 1K is made of the same low grade LDF box and paper thin metal back plate and most of them ring very audibly around 200Hz if you play a test tone. This is well documented by users about the Yamaha's, my JBLs and others. I personally can't hear it while music is playing and I don't use them for critical listening so not a big issue for me. However, I hear the box ring quite loud if I play a test tone, more audibly on one speaker than the other, so it's an assembly QC as much as lack of build quality.

The sound for the price is again nothing short of amazing in these budget actives.
 

MajorFubar

New member
Mar 3, 2010
690
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0
gasolin said:
Would be strange if there where listening fattigue when a HS7 often is used for mixing or recording for many hours every day, i do how ever hear a few on forums talk about listening fattigue,maby they have listen to songs that are not that good recorded.
The ear fatigue that producers talk about isn't the same as the ear fatigue hifi enthusiasts talk about. Hifi enthusiasts call it ear fatigue when their hifi hurts their ears after a long period of time, usually because it's too forward or brash. Producers call it ear fatigue to describe the 'ear-blindness' they get when they've been mixing the same song for six hours straight and they can lo nonger tell whether the tiny tweaks they're making are better or just different.

Sooo...do you like them?
 

davedotco

New member
Apr 24, 2013
20
0
0
drummerman said:
davedotco said:
Vladimir said:
Well they are cheap and cheaply made. Unlike the metal case Gens these cabinets ring at ~200Hz like 1950s telephones. There's no free lunch. It's amazing how good budget actives sound considering they are made from decomposed garbage.
To be fair, the cabinets on the Yamahas are not that bad, I can really only 'hear' them sounding off on the big HS8s, which is one of the main reasons I think the HS7 is a better bet for hi-fi use.

The other components are as good as they need to be, and no more. Effectively built around cheap 'plate' amplifiers and drivers designed to do the specific job at hand, the proof is very much in the pudding.

Sold in huge numbers, well regarded in general, reliable and consistent, testiment to their design and entirely adequate build quality.

As I mentioned above, you can pay more for a basic 6.5 inch two way, such as 'The Rock' at £2.5k or the mass market but higher quality A7x at about £1k, technically all round better products, better sounding too, but in the pro world you get what you pay for rather more often than you do in hi-fi.
It seems you have heard just about every active speaker.

How come?
Couple of mates in a pro-audio store in north london. They were always borrowing stuff and, a year or two ago, a handful of speakers found their way into my home. Mostly small, budget models, Yamaha HS5, HS7, Presonus Eris 5 and a couple of others. These were to upgrade my tiny and cheap (£110pr at purchase) Seiwin SN4 desktop models that were being used as main speakers.

Best I got to try at home at sensible price were the Adams, I was looking to buy some A7x when I saw and bought a mint pair of Artist 6.

I've heard a fair few others in the showroom, including the Equator D5, which I like a lot and these units form the basis of my recommendations. The Unity Audio model is a pretty old design that I know from the studio, as they use Elac drive units I got 'hands on' with them when I was doing some PR work for Elac.
 

gasolin

Well-known member
Mar 17, 2013
955
160
19,070
davedotco said:
drummerman said:
davedotco said:
Vladimir said:
Well they are cheap and cheaply made. Unlike the metal case Gens these cabinets ring at ~200Hz like 1950s telephones. There's no free lunch. It's amazing how good budget actives sound considering they are made from decomposed garbage.
To be fair, the cabinets on the Yamahas are not that bad, I can really only 'hear' them sounding off on the big HS8s, which is one of the main reasons I think the HS7 is a better bet for hi-fi use.

The other components are as good as they need to be, and no more. Effectively built around cheap 'plate' amplifiers and drivers designed to do the specific job at hand, the proof is very much in the pudding.

Sold in huge numbers, well regarded in general, reliable and consistent, testiment to their design and entirely adequate build quality.

As I mentioned above, you can pay more for a basic 6.5 inch two way, such as 'The Rock' at £2.5k or the mass market but higher quality A7x at about £1k, technically all round better products, better sounding too, but in the pro world you get what you pay for rather more often than you do in hi-fi.
It seems you have heard just about every active speaker.

How come?
Couple of mates in a pro-audio store in north london. They were always borrowing stuff and, a year or two ago, a handful of speakers found their way into my home. Mostly small, budget models, Yamaha HS5, HS7, Presonus Eris 5 and a couple of others. These were to upgrade my tiny and cheap (£110pr at purchase) Seiwin SN4 desktop models that were being used as main speakers.

Best I got to try at home at sensible price were the Adams, I was looking to buy some A7x when I saw and bought a mint pair of Artist 6.

I've heard a fair few others in the showroom, including the Equator D5, which I like a lot and these units form the basis of my recommendations. The Unity Audio model is a pretty old design that I know from the studio, as they use Elac drive units I got 'hands on' with them when I was doing some PR work for Elac.
Adam Artist are just hifi versions of the adam a3x and a5x like Genelec g one and two are hifi versions of genelec 8010 and 8020, they should all sound the same hifi and studio versions.

I have hear about the equator's and what i hear alot is that they after a while loses some of the openess and clarity that they have and is the reason why many like them so much.
 

gasolin

Well-known member
Mar 17, 2013
955
160
19,070
MajorFubar said:
gasolin said:
Would be strange if there where listening fattigue when a HS7 often is used for mixing or recording for many hours every day, i do how ever hear a few on forums talk about listening fattigue,maby they have listen to songs that are not that good recorded.
The ear fatigue that producers talk about isn't the same as the ear fatigue hifi enthusiasts talk about. Hifi enthusiasts call it ear fatigue when their hifi hurts their ears after a long period of time, usually because it's too forward or brash. Producers call it ear fatigue to describe the 'ear-blindness' they get when they've been mixing the same song for six hours straight and they can lo nonger tell whether the tiny tweaks they're making are better or just different.

Sooo...do you like them?
When i talk/think about listening fattigue it's the agressive ear piercing sound with an agressive,screaming midrange and metallic top,tweeter that often is loud, it can also be a sound with a very unnaturally loud boomy midbass and lower midrange where you almost get an headache (krk rookit, it also have a sparkling top) it might sound good and impressive the first time you listen to them, after a while it can get annoying,it's to much, sounds unnaturally (loudness war).

Yamaha HS7 sounds really good in the top with pink floyds dark side of the moon,roy orbison black and white and george michael listen without prejudice (mtv unplugged deluxe) from tidal hifi, at low to medium volume (haven't relly tried them at loud levels) and some songs less good,but that's normal, it is after alll studio monitors and that's what they do, sound good when playing songs with high sound quality and less when playing music where sound quality is less important or just a bad remastered music (loudness war).

I like them.......
 

davedotco

New member
Apr 24, 2013
20
0
0
gasolin said:
davedotco said:
drummerman said:
davedotco said:
Vladimir said:
Well they are cheap and cheaply made. Unlike the metal case Gens these cabinets ring at ~200Hz like 1950s telephones. There's no free lunch. It's amazing how good budget actives sound considering they are made from decomposed garbage.
To be fair, the cabinets on the Yamahas are not that bad, I can really only 'hear' them sounding off on the big HS8s, which is one of the main reasons I think the HS7 is a better bet for hi-fi use.

The other components are as good as they need to be, and no more. Effectively built around cheap 'plate' amplifiers and drivers designed to do the specific job at hand, the proof is very much in the pudding.

Sold in huge numbers, well regarded in general, reliable and consistent, testiment to their design and entirely adequate build quality.

As I mentioned above, you can pay more for a basic 6.5 inch two way, such as 'The Rock' at £2.5k or the mass market but higher quality A7x at about £1k, technically all round better products, better sounding too, but in the pro world you get what you pay for rather more often than you do in hi-fi.
It seems you have heard just about every active speaker.

How come?
Couple of mates in a pro-audio store in north london. They were always borrowing stuff and, a year or two ago, a handful of speakers found their way into my home. Mostly small, budget models, Yamaha HS5, HS7, Presonus Eris 5 and a couple of others. These were to upgrade my tiny and cheap (£110pr at purchase) Seiwin SN4 desktop models that were being used as main speakers.

Best I got to try at home at sensible price were the Adams, I was looking to buy some A7x when I saw and bought a mint pair of Artist 6.

I've heard a fair few others in the showroom, including the Equator D5, which I like a lot and these units form the basis of my recommendations. The Unity Audio model is a pretty old design that I know from the studio, as they use Elac drive units I got 'hands on' with them when I was doing some PR work for Elac.
Adam Artist are just hifi versions of the adam a3x and a5x like Genelec g one and two are hifi versions of genelec 8010 and 8020, they should all sound the same hifi and studio versions.

I have hear about the equator's and what i hear alot is that they after a while loses some of the openess and clarity that they have and is the reason why many like them so much.
These models were never released as 'hi-fi', Adam produced some hi-fi models (Tensor, Pencil) in the past but seem to have quit this market 5 or 6 years ago. The Artist series, were released as 'multimedia' products through Adams normal professional supply chain, the Artist 3 and 5 were indeed versions of the A3x and A5x and had a usb digital input as well as the usual analog. On the other hand, the Artist 6 was a unique model, a floorstander, though oddly with no usb. All models, including the rare Artist 6H centre channel were finished in a quality high gloss black or white finish.

The Artist 6 is a slim, elegant floorstander that would suit the hi-fi market in many ways, very 'fashionable' slim column with 2 x 4.5 inch bass drivers (A3x, Artist 3) and ribbon tweeter driven by 3 x 30/50 watt amplifiers. Performance is better than the A5x but does not have the bass presence of the A7x, it was originally available in europe for around €1200-1500.

It was never effectively marketed in the uk, but given the current upsurge in interest in active designs it might have done well, depending on the price.

Pro users have lttle use for the premium finish and seemingly no interest at all in compact floorstanders so sales were poor and manufacturing ceased a year or so ago. There seem to be a few Artist 3 and Artist 5 models still working their way through the supply chain.
 

Vladimir

New member
Dec 26, 2013
220
4
0
The difference between a speaker and a studio monitor is not always visually apparent. Studio monitors are speakers, but provide a different sound and are designed for a specific use in recording studios.
Sound
Manufacturers go to great lengths to design speakers that enhance audio quality with rich bass, mids and high frequencies. Makers of studio monitors go to great lengths to design monitors that do not enhance sound, and strive for flat-response of all frequencies.
Projection
Speakers are designed to project sound evenly throughout the room. Studio monitors are designed to project sound a very short distance to prevent the room from coloring or enhancing frequencies.
Benefits
Speakers benefit listeners by providing enhanced sound that is evenly dispersed. Studio monitors benefit recording engineers by providing unadulterated sound for accurate music mixing.
Purpose
The purpose of speakers is to provide listening enjoyment in music's finished state. The purpose of studio monitors is to provide a "clean drawing board" for the creation and building of music mixes, on its way to a finished state.
Amplifiers
Many studio monitors come with integrated power amplifiers designed especially for the demanding specifications and applications of monitor speakers. Un-powered monitors are paired with special "reference" power amplifiers designed for ultra-clean operation. Regular speakers are usually passive, and are driven by an external tuner/amplifier.
Other Facts
Studio monitors are often called "reference" or "near-field" monitors because of their use as a sound referencing tool in the close-listening and low-volume environment of a recording studio. Studio monitors would surely disappoint home audio listeners for their lack of powerful, rich sound. But without them, professionally produced and finished music wouldn't sound quite right.

Source article

Thoughts?
 

davedotco

New member
Apr 24, 2013
20
0
0
Vladimir said:
The difference between a speaker and a studio monitor is not always visually apparent. Studio monitors are speakers, but provide a different sound and are designed for a specific use in recording studios.
Sound
Manufacturers go to great lengths to design speakers that enhance audio quality with rich bass, mids and high frequencies. Makers of studio monitors go to great lengths to design monitors that do not enhance sound, and strive for flat-response of all frequencies.
Projection
Speakers are designed to project sound evenly throughout the room. Studio monitors are designed to project sound a very short distance to prevent the room from coloring or enhancing frequencies.
Benefits
Speakers benefit listeners by providing enhanced sound that is evenly dispersed. Studio monitors benefit recording engineers by providing unadulterated sound for accurate music mixing.
Purpose
The purpose of speakers is to provide listening enjoyment in music's finished state. The purpose of studio monitors is to provide a "clean drawing board" for the creation and building of music mixes, on its way to a finished state.
Amplifiers
Many studio monitors come with integrated power amplifiers designed especially for the demanding specifications and applications of monitor speakers. Un-powered monitors are paired with special "reference" power amplifiers designed for ultra-clean operation. Regular speakers are usually passive, and are driven by an external tuner/amplifier.
Other Facts
Studio monitors are often called "reference" or "near-field" monitors because of their use as a sound referencing tool in the close-listening and low-volume environment of a recording studio. Studio monitors would surely disappoint home audio listeners for their lack of powerful, rich sound. But without them, professionally produced and finished music wouldn't sound quite right.

Source article

Thoughts?
Complete bollox.

Just about every thoughtless misconception and missunderstanding about the subject in one place.

I know you are quoting someone else, but this is pretty poor.
 

Native_bon

Well-known member
Nov 26, 2008
180
2
18,595
I have the HS8's in my music studio for 5years now, don't see the need to change them. Setting center when monitoring the image they produce is rock solid. Got them about 7ft apart. They seem to sound just right on the bass department in my room. I got them A foot from the rear.

I think Yamaha's are best value for money anything for sound I own so far.
 

gasolin

Well-known member
Mar 17, 2013
955
160
19,070
Projection

Listen alot to music at my desk with my 34" and 25" monitor (near field), my yamahas sounds good medium loud, when im in my kitchen making dinner or laundry i don't care so much about sound quality, i want the music to be loud enough.I don't notice at a long distance like in my bathroom that the sound quality is more than only just a little bit differnt, they do somehow sound best at short distance, most differnce at 1-1.5 meter longer away from the speakers i notice is less bass

You can use studio monitors in a big room https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=en9Mf8R1drY
 

Native_bon

Well-known member
Nov 26, 2008
180
2
18,595
gasolin said:
Projection

 

Listen alot to music at my desk with my 34" and 25" monitor (near field), my yamahas sounds good medium loud, when im in my kitchen making dinner or laundry i don't care so much about sound quality, i want the music to be loud enough.I don't notice at a long distance like in my bathroom that the sound quality is more than only just a  little bit differnt, they do somehow sound best at short distance, most differnce at 1-1.5 meter longer away from the speakers i notice is less bass

 

You can use studio monitors in a big room https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=en9Mf8R1drY
Nice setup. See Marcus Miller doing his thing.
 

Vladimir

New member
Dec 26, 2013
220
4
0
davedotco said:
Complete bollox.

Just about every thoughtless misconception and missunderstanding about the subject in one place.

I know you are quoting someone else, but this is pretty poor.
And that's what's circulated out there as a corrective to misconceptions about studio active speakers.
 

gasolin

Well-known member
Mar 17, 2013
955
160
19,070
Really does a great job

Turn them on i only hear the firm click the on/off button makes, they are on as soon as there are light in the front, i don't notice any hiss *good*

As som reviews say they don't add anything to the music and have one of the most uncoloured sound.

Mine is -2db Room control, to keep the bass form being to fullbodied,muddy.

Clear uncoloured sound where it's easy to hear all the details (within it's price limited,it's after all budget studio monitors) even at low level without sounding bright agressive, unless it's how the music is recorded,midrange sounds much more neutral than the HS5'S

Fullbodied fairly deep bass that do get loud,punchy when needed, although still not as tight,firm and dry as a big pa bass,subwoofer

As metioned many times they do get pretty loud, i feel the HS5 are louder than the krk rookit 5 an that the rookit 5's are loud enough for my needs, so the Yamaha HS7'S just have more dynamic headroom and power for bass,more than most people need using than as intended as near field speakers/monitors, i love it

Stereo image is good, i hear the voices (movie,tv) in the center and generally the sound is wide, don't notice any listening fattigue like some do, do to a agressive sounding speaker, mabye my nad amp i use (volume,turntable,cdplayer) is responsible for that, since it's more dark sounding than bright, which can give listening fattigue if one thing in a hifi system has a bright sound.

All that hasn't changed after a week..........

Highly recommended since theres more bass and less midrange heavy than the HS5 and not as big as the HS8, they do sound good even when they you don't use them for making music, just use them as high quality computer speakers for listening to music,movies,tv
 

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