Will the CD player ever die out?

A

Anonymous

Guest
Will the CD format ever die out like the cassette and be completely superseded by digital media and streaming audio. Or will it live on like the vinyl?
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
Will it manage to stay dominant over digital streaming?
 

mpapo

New member
Jan 15, 2011
13
0
0
will die out sooner than expected I think, CD offers no quality increase in comparison with digital files & is less friendly in use.

Purists will keep buying vinyl, the others will go the streaming route & CD will die imo.
 

Cypher

New member
Jun 8, 2007
156
0
0
mpapo said:
will die out sooner than expected I think, CD offers no quality increase in comparison with digital files & is less friendly in use.

Purists will keep buying vinyl, the others will go the streaming route & CD will die imo.
I agree. I think the CD will die out soon now.........streaming audio is becoming very popular.
 

WinterRacer

New member
Jan 14, 2009
34
0
0
I think think they will become niche pretty soon. CDs are just an old fashioned way of transporting digital files about, they take up lots of space and offer no quality benefits over downloads. I guess they'll be confined to people that don't like or want change and the odd hi-fi enthusiast who doesn't understand digital.
 

paradiziac

New member
Jan 8, 2011
17
0
0
Since I started streaming from my computer, I've bought more CDs than ever and I don't even have a CD player!
 

gregvet

Well-known member
Dec 24, 2008
128
10
18,595
I think there will be a market or CD's until legal download quality meets/exceeds cd quality. I know 'the youth of today' don't care that iTunes (et al) is lossy, but enough people do care to mean CDs will still be bought.

Once we can burn a cd at original quality from our iTunes downloads, what would be the point buying music any other way than downloading?

Streaming and not owning the music may well be the mass market future, but some people are always going to want to own the music in some form, even if that is just files on the mac.
 

plastic penguin

Well-known member
chris88 said:
Will the CD format ever die out like the cassette and be completely superseded by digital media and streaming audio. Or will it live on like the vinyl?
CDs will continue as long as people are prepared to buy. With cassettes (audio and film) is a little different because they were troublesome (tangling up, iffy quality), whereas cds, generally speaking, still offers good quality repro.
 

matthewpiano

Well-known member
Nov 23, 2007
494
330
19,270
I can't see the CD player dying out that quickly to be honest, and I think that at the very least there will always be some sort of transport available so that people can play discs with external DACs. Despite being very happy with the Squeezebox Touch and my Rega turntable, CD is still my most used format, currently being enjoyed on my resurrected NAD C521BEE player. For me it is about more than the CD simply being a carrier of digital files. I still like the physical aspect - the liner notes, the artwork, and browsing through a physical collection to choose something to play.
 

Electro

Well-known member
Mar 30, 2011
43
3
18,545
Eventually yes they will die out , but not until the multi millions of Cd's in ownership worldwide at the moment get dumped into skips or maybe given to charity shops by children who have been left a Cd collection in their parents will .

I bet if second hand Cd sales were counted in the sales figures it would rival or maybe beat download figures , I buy literally hundreds of second hand Cd's a year because they are so cheap , in fact I buy more now than I ever have even at the peak of the Cd.

You will have to prise my Cd player out of my cold dead hands ;)
 

Charlie Jefferson

Well-known member
Sep 2, 2007
229
0
18,790
Not sure it will die out as such, less extinct more a slow-dying breed.

Streaming &/or cloud-based services could well held sway in the mainstream within a few years. It seems to be inexorably heading that way.

I can't quite see CDs or CD players holding the same allure as vinyl and turntables but I'm sure they'll cling on for a few more years, ever marginalised.

Personally, I haven't played a CD for ages, maybe one for my little boys that hadn't been ripped to iTunes, but that's about it. I'll keep the machine as a back up, but for me it's vinyl and streaming all the way.
 

toyota man

New member
Apr 22, 2009
79
0
0
having a cd collection of over 1000 and at the momenent more like 2500 as my sons cds are still with us as he has just moved out I would like to think they will hang in there for a few more years my son has all of his cds on his itunes and most of the time he listens on his ipod for me the quality needs to be better . plus I also like some thing to look at with some details of singer etc (Long live cd ):cheers:
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
I think that the actual cd players them selves will still be produced but will incorporate netwroking capabilities, the actual cd format i think will die out eventual but not for a while. I think the only forseeable use for the CD is to burn music onto it from a computer
 

crusaderlord

New member
Apr 29, 2008
103
0
0
whilst i have a streaming set up i still prefer my cd - quality is comparable for sure, although i still think my cd player has the edge and is a touch more musical to listen to.

i dont think they will die out, whilst digital is getting more popular there is still a massive cd user base - maybe one day it will become more specialised but it will still have a place like vinyl has now with a few player producers making new models

i talk and help a lot of people who still have trouble setting up streaming and network connections so its not straighforward for everyone
 

mykspence

New member
Feb 12, 2011
34
0
0
The simple answer is no, people still play wax cylinders. The chances of cd's being available in your local Esso station 10 years from now is slim though.
 

SteveR750

Well-known member
Mar 11, 2005
560
33
18,920
CDs are a perfect form of archive, so unlikely, though I guess sales of mp3 files will increasingly displace CDs for the majority of people. The popularity of CD is probably most closely linked in the future to mobile data speeds. Once 3G and 4G start to become much more common, then the whole way we download and listen to music could change, spotify has made my ipod completely redundant. That said, I can't imagine that CDs and their respective stand alone players will be as fondly popular as vinyl, the *magic* just isn't there.
 

crusaderlord

New member
Apr 29, 2008
103
0
0
The other issue which is often mentioned is that a downloaded file just doesnt really feel like a product you can own and love.

I get the fact that Vinyl still offers the best format for pride of ownership but i have a number of cd editions i like to look at while listening and am delighted to own. I never feel the same about tracks downloaded - when i get bored of them i delete them and feel no loss.

I think i would be one who if cds dissapeared would buy a turntable again and get that instead just to have an item to pick off the shelf, browse and play.
 

CnoEvil

New member
Aug 21, 2009
556
9
0
I see CDs themselves hanging around longer than CDPs, due to people wanting to buy something physical. It also has the added benefit of owning a back-up hard copy (that can be used elsewhere)....this may well be to do with my age, which gives me a healthy (irrational) scepticism, for all things computing.
 

FennerMachine

New member
Feb 5, 2011
83
0
0
Probably. Eventually. One day. Many moons from now. Many, many moons from now.

CD's will be around for a LONG time. Therefore so will players.

Tape decks are still available, so why not CD players?

DVD & Blu-Ray players can play CD's.

Computers generally require an optical drive to install operating systems.

As someone who works with computers everyday (partner in a local computer shop) I will likely not use streaming/computers as a main source for a LONG time! I see what happens when they go wrong! IF you depend on streaming/computer make backups!
 

professorhat

Well-known member
Dec 28, 2007
992
22
18,895
FennerMachine said:
Computers generally require an optical drive to install operating systems.
Well, that's not really true in 99% of circumstances any more. Mac OS X Lion wasn't available on DVD (you could get a USB stick if you really wanted to, but few people did) and Mountain Lion isn't even going to be available on a USB stick - it'll be through download only. I suspect Microsoft and Windows will follow suit with Windows 8. And I can't remember the last time I installed any application from a CD - it's been a few years at least...

But I agree with your other points :)
 

ASK THE COMMUNITY

TRENDING THREADS

Latest posts