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Single Monitor speaker

Sep 21, 2016
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Thank you in advance for any advice you can offer.

I have recently purchased a JBL LSR 305 active speaker but due to some misunderstanding I currently only have one (you are able to purchase them singularly).

This speaker has both XLR and TRS 6.3mm audio inputs.

I am using a deagonly dac with a 3.5mm output cable, plugged into a 3.5mm to 6.3mm converter into the speaker, however when I attempt to play music throught the speaker the sound lacks any low frequencies. If I fiddle with the 3.5mm cable either at the adapter or dac end (ie remove slightly from jack) I can angle the connection so that a more normal sound can be heard on the speaker.

I have a feeling it may have something to do with the cable being for a single source, while the speaker wants to act as pair so connections are slightly different?

I am a realtive novice to this so any advice would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks,

Sam.
 

davedotco

New member
Apr 24, 2013
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Interesting.

You have a three pole mini jack which will have a stereo signal on the tip and ring and a 6.3mm jack socket which will have +ve and -ve phase of a single channel on the tip and ring.

It is about as big a c*ck up as it is possible to get in audio.

You need to combine the two channels of the dac into a mono signal, then apply the mono signal to the tip, +ve phase only, of the 6.3mm jack socket. You will also need to determin whether the unused ring, -ve phase only needs to be tied to ground or left floating, that will be determined by the design of the differential input stage of the speaker.

Good luck with that...*crazy*
 

luckylion100

New member
Nov 6, 2011
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you came on here previously seeking advice,. were offered plenty of options and appear to have followed none of it. As said above, save up for the extra speaker to complete the pair.
 

ID.

New member
Feb 22, 2010
207
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Seems odd.

When I have my 3.5mm to 6.5mm splitter cable attached to just one active monitor I still get the full frequency range (well, as full as the little speakers can play). I've only ever experienced that issue with older portable music players and earphones where there was some wear and/or damage creating contact issues and meaning the bass wasn't being transmitted, in which case I'd assume a problem with the cable. I'm not sure that there's an easy or practical way to use it as a mono speaker with both the left and right channel programming coming through. Not sure whether you could rig up something with a splitter and then using splitter "backwards" as it were to combine the two into a single input cable.

For reference, almost all pro monitors are priced/sold as single units, but unfortunately they don't always tell you that.

Best solution - get another speaker. They're pretty cheap.
 

davedotco

New member
Apr 24, 2013
20
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ID. said:
Seems odd.

When I have my 3.5mm to 6.5mm splitter cable attached to just one active monitor I still get the full frequency range (well, as full as the little speakers can play). I've only ever experienced that issue with older portable music players and earphones where there was some wear and/or damage creating contact issues and meaning the bass wasn't being transmitted, in which case I'd assume a problem with the cable. I'm not sure that there's an easy or practical way to use it as a mono speaker with both the left and right channel programming coming through. Not sure whether you could rig up something with a splitter and then using splitter "backwards" as it were to combine the two into a single input cable.

For reference, almost all pro monitors are priced/sold as single units, but unfortunately they don't always tell you that.

Best solution - get another speaker. They're pretty cheap.
We do not even know whether the 6.3mm jack is 2 or 3 pole, there are a number of different scenarios.

Assuming it is a 3 pole, same as the mini-jack output, and wired correctly, you are inputing a stereo signal into a differential input, The differential amplifier will reverse the phase of one channel then sum it with the second channel, ie producing a difference signal. This may be what is being heard.

There are other posibilities too, depending on the plug and how it is wired. The differences heard when 'wiggling' the mini-jack means that different connections are being made and broken, an example of why these awful connectors are really unsuited for such usage.
 

Al ears

Moderator
Sam Allen said:
I was told by several people on these forums that the JBL 305 were a very good choice, so I listened to advice I was given.

Sorry but you are being harsh.
Perhaps they naturally presumed you would be purchasing a pair.
 

davedotco

New member
Apr 24, 2013
20
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Sam Allen said:
I was told by several people on these forums that the JBL 305 were a very good choice, so I listened to advice I was given.

Sorry but you are being harsh.
Are a very decent budget active monitor, I do not think anyone has suggested differently.

Like most such speakers they have balanced (differential) inputs, this is not to normal hi-fi standards so requires special, perhaps custom built, cables. The Audioquest dac uses a mini-jack output, extremely difficult to build a cable that can connect it to the speakers, off the shelf cables will not do the job.

You were told, quite clearly in the other thread that this would be difficult, and alternatives suggested.

You can try and get a custom built cable, ideally a stereo mini-jack (Audioquest) to 2 three pole 6.3mm jack plugs (speakers). The three pole jacks need to be tested to see if the ring, -ve phase of the balanced input, is left floating or needs to be grounded.

If you can return the dac for a refund, I would do so.
 

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