Question Q Acoustics 3020i stands

jonboywalton75

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Jan 11, 2012
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12th Monkey

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Aug 31, 2015
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I'm sorry that no-one's replied, but I'd be comparing the plate size with speakers' footprint and certainly not wanting to see much spare of the latter beyond the former. Acoustically, I'm afraid I have nothing to say!
 

scene

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Sep 25, 2008
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The two different Fisual stands are very different heights. They're about 40cm different. You want your speakers (ideally) so the tweeter is at approximately ear height when listening. The first ones are quite tall and, I would think, more suitable if you're sitting at a desk or table. The shorter ones look a better height for listening when on a sofa or armchair...

Regarding the plate size: You don't want it bigger than the speaker, and you don't want it massively smaller - the speakers can get a bit unstable. Otherwise, not that important to match the plate size exactly. For reference, the plate size on the Q3000FSi stands , made for the 3020i by Q-Acoustics is 250 x 290mm (and they're 682mm high). The Fisual Dynami has a plate of 165x200mm - so quite a bit smaller.

I must admit, mine are just sitting on shelves on my Billy bookcase, and they sound great...
 

jonboywalton75

Well-known member
Jan 11, 2012
161
46
18,620
The two different Fisual stands are very different heights. They're about 40cm different. You want your speakers (ideally) so the tweeter is at approximately ear height when listening. The first ones are quite tall and, I would think, more suitable if you're sitting at a desk or table. The shorter ones look a better height for listening when on a sofa or armchair...

Regarding the plate size: You don't want it bigger than the speaker, and you don't want it massively smaller - the speakers can get a bit unstable. Otherwise, not that important to match the plate size exactly. For reference, the plate size on the Q3000FSi stands , made for the 3020i by Q-Acoustics is 250 x 290mm (and they're 682mm high). The Fisual Dynami has a plate of 165x200mm - so quite a bit smaller.

I must admit, mine are just sitting on shelves on my Billy bookcase, and they sound great...
Might go then bookshelf route then.
Cheers for ALL the replies
 

nopiano

Well-known member
600mm is a popular height, or 24” in old money. Quite common for small bookshelf speakers, those with a height and width similar to a sheet of A4. ( I like a reference!)
QA have unusually deep cabinets, but measured carefully, and with something grippy to keep them firm, stands should give better sound and more flexibility than bookshelves.
 
D

Deleted member 116933

Guest
The two different Fisual stands are very different heights. They're about 40cm different. You want your speakers (ideally) so the tweeter is at approximately ear height when listening. The first ones are quite tall and, I would think, more suitable if you're sitting at a desk or table. The shorter ones look a better height for listening when on a sofa or armchair...

Regarding the plate size: You don't want it bigger than the speaker, and you don't want it massively smaller - the speakers can get a bit unstable. Otherwise, not that important to match the plate size exactly. For reference, the plate size on the Q3000FSi stands , made for the 3020i by Q-Acoustics is 250 x 290mm (and they're 682mm high). The Fisual Dynami has a plate of 165x200mm - so quite a bit smaller.

I must admit, mine are just sitting on shelves on my Billy bookcase, and they sound great...
that isn’t quite right. But sometimes it is but not always lol. Not all speakers are tuned to have there tweeters at ear level. Some are the half way point between the tweeter and the woofer and the woofer it’s self! Missions old school designs spring to mind. Really the only way to find that out is to contact q acoustic.

I’ve also found some speakers don’t even like plated stands such as harbeths, preferring the something solid type designs being only point supported at the ends/apex of the box.

Above all the stand needs to be mass loaded to get rid of the ring and allows it to penetrate the carpet and underlay to find stable footing. Something I’ve had problems with in the past as our underlay is pretty thick. So heavier the better 5kgs-10kg will not penetrate thick carpets 20-30kg will.

As always it’s more complicated than it seems. And sounds funny but it’s worth going to the hifi shop to audition a few as stands can make big differences to speakers. It can make them sound sluggish or th bass can be really over powering or worst rob them of all bass
 

scene

Moderator
Sep 25, 2008
784
181
19,070
that isn’t quite right. But sometimes it is but not always lol. Not all speakers are tuned to have there tweeters at ear level. Some are the half way point between the tweeter and the woofer and the woofer it’s self! Missions old school designs spring to mind. Really the only way to find that out is to contact q acoustic.

I’ve also found some speakers don’t even like plated stands such as harbeths, preferring the something solid type designs being only point supported at the ends/apex of the box.

Above all the stand needs to be mass loaded to get rid of the ring and allows it to penetrate the carpet and underlay to find stable footing. Something I’ve had problems with in the past as our underlay is pretty thick. So heavier the better 5kgs-10kg will not penetrate thick carpets 20-30kg will.

As always it’s more complicated than it seems. And sounds funny but it’s worth going to the hifi shop to audition a few as stands can make big differences to speakers. It can make them sound sluggish or th bass can be really over powering or worst rob them of all bass
Agreed, it's sort of a rule of thumb, except when it isn't...

And yes, absolutely agree it's worth trying some out, no substitute for demoing in person. You'd hope the q3000FSi would be a perfect match, but paying £125 when the speakers cost £150 (and yes, my maths failed me on my other post 83% of the cost of the speakers) is a bit over the top...
 
D

Deleted member 116933

Guest
Agreed, it's sort of a rule of thumb, except when it isn't...

And yes, absolutely agree it's worth trying some out, no substitute for demoing in person. You'd hope the q3000FSi would be a perfect match, but paying £125 when the speakers cost £150 (and yes, my maths failed me on my other post 83% of the cost of the speakers) is a bit over the top...
I’d say so. It’s a little over the top but the best supporting stands with any sort of heft are a little more expensive if that heft is needed . Stands have the potential to last a literal lifetime if looked after. I Have some partington super dreadnoughts that are nearly 15 years old which I bought for £150 and look as good as new. £150 over 15 years pretty good value in my eyes. And built like a brick 💩house.
 

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