Question Longevity of HiFi gear.

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Oxfordian

Well-known member
I believe when things are over five years old you can take them to independent Hi-Fi repair specialists. They'll get hold of the parts they can. If you look at some of the adverts these guys run, they tell you that they might well be able to get hold of the parts that the manufacturer says aren't available.
There's always hope anyway that maybe you'll be able to keep a unit running if you want to.
This is my point, if you spend a good few hundred (maybe thousands) quid on hifi gear you want it to be repairable, you want to be able to have the manufacturer keep your prized possessions running for a long time to come, you certainly don't want to be told after 5 years that it is unrepairable.

So if you are able to wouldn't it be better to buy your hifi products from a manufacturer who will keep your items running for a long long time through the ability to service and repair your products. For example I read recently that both Linn and Naim will and can repair their products from the 1970's, sure you have to pay but its that better than putting the product into landfill?

This is why for my next upgrades I will be looking at the ability of the manufacturer to keep my chosen HiFi out of the local 'small electrical' bin at the local skip.
 

Stuart83

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Jul 22, 2023
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Just to mention despite updating my main hifi mainly for connectivity I still use equipment over 30yrs old with only minor age related problems.

Only recently replacing the cartridge on an old system deck iix.
I only felt obliged to replace the belt and bearing just to go through the motions but it wasn't necessary.

I still play my favourite pioneer a400 amp after a quick service and power led replacement recently as part of a 2 amp set up in my second hifi.
I like to use a Yamaha with dab and Bluetooth etc and the a400 for cds.
Because of a further sentimental value on top of the already very good sound quality I like to keep it inclusive.

The Marantz cd52 mk2 is still going absolutely fine with just a new eject wheel replacement.
I don't see such problems as major failures only minor problems not unlike servicing a car yourself.

I have binned many more modern hifi separates in the last few yrs which is more in keeping with another thread, but the quality of older gear does seem better.

For instance I've had 2 modern amps go faulty refusing a third replacement and changing brand.

My 25yr old dj record decks from the 90s are fine having many different stylus and cartridge combos over over the yrs yet I've had 2 sets of more modern dj cd decks go bad in half the time.
Only recently going over to digital mixing which brings into play the reliability of the laptop that holds the software which is a story on its own.
Knowing laptops intimately I expect failures along the way until the regular 5yr rule comes into play.

Not to look past blatant good luck but I've had many vintage separates in my teens as mentioned before in prior posts including a 70s sansui au501 amp that worked fine throughout my early teens in the 90s into the early 2000s before being lost in a house move, even an Armstrong amp that was dropped and still worked fine.

Come to think of it I've never had many complete failures of older hifi.

I can only comment on what the experience I've had and haven't got the hindsight of knowing how long my current equipment will last but in view of how some of the modern equivalents held up I'm not as confident as I used to be in the longevity of new hifi.
 
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Oxfordian

Well-known member
Just to mention despite updating my main hifi mainly for connectivity I still use equipment over 30yrs old with only minor age related problems.

Only recently replacing the cartridge on an old system deck iix.
I only felt obliged to replace the belt and bearing just to go through the motions but it wasn't necessary.

I still play my favourite pioneer a400 amp after a quick service and power led replacement recently as part of a 2 amp set up in my second hifi.
I like to use a Yamaha with dab and Bluetooth etc and the a400 for cds.
Because of a further sentimental value on top of the already very good sound quality I like to keep it inclusive.

The Marantz cd52 mk2 is still going absolutely fine with just a new eject wheel replacement.
I don't see such problems as major failures only minor problems not unlike servicing a car yourself.

I have binned many more modern hifi separates in the last few yrs which is more in keeping with another thread, but the quality of older gear does seem better.

For instance I've had 2 modern amps go faulty refusing a third replacement and changing brand.

My 25yr old dj record decks from the 90s are fine having many different stylus and cartridge combos over over the yrs yet I've had 2 sets of more modern dj cd decks go bad in half the time.
Only recently going over to digital mixing which brings into play the reliability of the laptop that holds the software which is a story on its own.
Knowing laptops intimately I expect failures along the way until the regular 5yr rule comes into play.

Not to look past blatant good luck but I've had many vintage separates in my teens as mentioned before in prior posts including a 70s sansui au501 amp that worked fine throughout my early teens in the 90s into the early 2000s before being lost in a house move, even an Armstrong amp that was dropped and still worked fine.

Come to think of it I've never had many complete failures of older hifi.

I can only comment on what the experience I've had and haven't got the hindsight of knowing how long my current equipment will last but in view of how some of the modern equivalents held up I'm not as confident as I used to be in the longevity of new hifi.
I would agree with older gear being better built, my belief is that there was a time when a manufacturer was delighted that you had bought their product and was more than happy to look after it long term. Yes this product was expensive but you bought once.

It is this buy once mentality that is getting me focused on the premium used market when I upgrade my system later this year, can I buy a top quality TT or Amplifier from a reputable source and know that there are companies out there than can keep it working, I think I can if I choose my products wisely. I believe that there are some HiFi companies out there that are more than happy to have your gear from 40+ years ago in for a service.
 
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