Is it possible for music to damage speakers at a normal volume?

spirit90

Active member
Apr 12, 2022
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I'm listening to harsh industrial music that includes a lot of extreme frequencies and feedback.

Assuming I'm listening at a reasonable volume, could this damage my stereo speakers in any way?

I asked this on another forum, and got mixed answers, so I figured I'd ask the experts here. :)

Probably a dumb question, but wanted to be sure.
 

spirit90

Active member
Apr 12, 2022
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Normal volume is relative. What does your system comprise of? It's very unlikely speakers will get damaged at normal volumes, unless they're very tiny.
My speakers can definitely handle even very loud volumes.

So, it doesn't matter what type of sounds are being made, just as long as it isn't too loud for the system?

I am playing music from the noise genre.
 
Assuming by normal volume you mean not exceeding half way around the volume dial, I'd have thought it unlikely - unless your amp is extremely beefy and your speakers wildly sensitive.
Or, indeed, the reverse. More damage done to speakers by too weak an amp trying to drive a beefy speaker.
However, in general, no I don't think normal volume listening of any frequency music will damage a suitable speaker.
 

Gray

Well-known member
I'm listening to harsh industrial music that includes a lot of extreme frequencies and feedback.
If you have to wonder about it damaging your speakers, it must be an enjoyable listen 😳
As long as the 'music' varies a bit, but you don't want prolonged extreme frequencies.
And, if subjected to what I've always known as feedback (caused by microphones), left to spiral, your speakers wouldn't last 5 minutes - even at normal volume. Presumably your sound isn't that bad 🤔
 

jjbomber

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Dec 22, 2006
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I'm listening to harsh industrial music that includes a lot of extreme frequencies and feedback.

Assuming I'm listening at a reasonable volume, could this damage my stereo speakers in any way?

I asked this on another forum, and got mixed answers, so I figured I'd ask the experts here. :)

Probably a dumb question, but wanted to be sure.
Highly unlikely that you will use 1 watt at normal listening, so no. By feedback I assume you mean on the recording rather than caused by the system itself.
 

spirit90

Active member
Apr 12, 2022
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By feedback, I mean sounds on the CD itself. Not the speakers!

I have a Panasonic SC-PMX800 that came with the speakers:

This stereo can get very loud, but I'm playing it at a lower volume.

The music I'm playing just has a lot of crazy and harsh sounds.
 

gasolin

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Mar 17, 2013
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why would you come up with a question like that ?

Is it possible for my car to get damage if i drive at normal speed

no

Shure if you drive into another care at a normal speed, that was really not the question


Do you get my point ?
 

Samd

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Mar 6, 2013
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why would you come up with a question like that ?

Is it possible for my car to get damage if i drive at normal speed

no

Shure if you drive into another care at a normal speed, that was really not the question


Do you get my point ?
If everyone's questions had to be valid against everyone else's standards, this cupboard would be bare!
 
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gasolin

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Mar 17, 2013
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i do think it is

Since normal speakers can play normal loud as long as there is no distrotion

A car can drive at a normal speed as long as you don do it in the lowest possible gear all the times
 

Gray

Well-known member
I've got a test CD with a damage warning on one specific track - but you really wouldn't to play any of the tracks for too long 🤪

Maybe it's what his 'harsh extreme frequency' music is like 🙃
 

gasolin

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I don't think you would play tracks with sub 20hz bass loud to hear or feel it on a small pair of harbeth p3esr, most tweeters go way above 20khz so you should be find as long as you don't overload the amp/speakers
 
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plastic penguin

Well-known member
Generally speaking damage can occur if you use a under powered amp cranked up very loud, which creates clipping or distortion.

Normal volume is IMHO is where you listen at reasonable levels and hold a conversation without raising your voice.
 
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Gray

Well-known member
Normal volume is IMHO is where you listen at reasonable levels and hold a conversation without raising your voice.
I've got a feeling his industrial music might preclude simultaneous conversation 🙂
(As I've previously said, conversation would be very difficult at my normal level - and impossible at my preferred level - I never do background music - I'm listening or it's off).
 

plastic penguin

Well-known member
I've got a feeling his industrial music might preclude simultaneous conversation 🙂
(As I've previously said, conversation would be very difficult at my normal level - and impossible at my preferred level - I never do background music - I'm listening or it's off).
Of course it's how you define normal levels. But I find with any genre of music, if we yell: "what!! I haven't seen Lynda in years!!"

"Not Lynda, Leicester!"

You know it's too loud.🙂
 

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