For recent remasters - LP or CD?

SloRick

Well-known member
Mar 5, 2022
36
10
1,545
Visit site
Hi folks, so I'm looking at buying "Toots And The Maytals, live at The Roxy 1975", which is taken from a radio broadcast, released in 2016.
===The question is: will is sound better on LP or CD? Wondering if perhaps CD, since presumably the master they were working with is digital.... ?
Any insights? Not sure how to think about this.
 

Gray

Well-known member
....presumably the master they were working with is digital.... ?
The remaster they're currently working with probably is.
But the original master from1975 is almost certainly on analogue tape.

The overall result will depend at least as much on how it was mixed and balanced in 1975 - and whether they've done nothing to ruin the remaster.

Maybe just go for your format of choice.
If it was me it would be CD - if only for its technical advantage and durability (and reduced ripoff price potential).
But if your TT sounds better than your CDP.....vinyl for you?
 

SloRick

Well-known member
Mar 5, 2022
36
10
1,545
Visit site
It says:
Klondike proudly presents the entire original KMET-FM broadcast of Toots and The Maytals live in Los Angeles from The Roxy on 1st October 1975.

Professionally re-mastered original broadcast with background liners and rare archival photos
Digitally remastered for enhanced sound quality
 

manicm

Well-known member
The remaster they're currently working with probably is.
But the original master from1975 is almost certainly on analogue tape.

The overall result will depend at least as much on how it was mixed and balanced in 1975 - and whether they've done nothing to ruin the remaster.

Maybe just go for your format of choice.
If it was me it would be CD - if only for its technical advantage and durability (and reduced ripoff price potential).
But if your TT sounds better than your CDP.....vinyl for you?

From what I glean elsewhere is that recent vinyl has a higher dynamic range than the same CD. Why that is I don't know.

What I also glean from my ears is that dynamic range has been a somewhat exaggerated facet of sound quality.
 

Oxfordian

Well-known member
It says:
Klondike proudly presents the entire original KMET-FM broadcast of Toots and The Maytals live in Los Angeles from The Roxy on 1st October 1975.

Professionally re-mastered original broadcast with background liners and rare archival photos
Digitally remastered for enhanced sound quality
There are no right or wrong answers to this, simply because there are too many variables, firstly this is a remaster and not all remasters improve the overall sound quality irrespective of medium, secondly how that master is transferred to the medium, for example a brilliant remastering can be ruined for vinyl if the pressing plant doesn't do its job properly.

CD tends to be cheaper, so might be the better bet but if you get a top remastering job and a first rate pressing then vinyl could be your best bet.
 
  • Like
Reactions: DougK1

SloRick

Well-known member
Mar 5, 2022
36
10
1,545
Visit site
There are no right or wrong answers to this, simply because there are too many variables, firstly this is a remaster and not all remasters improve the overall sound quality irrespective of medium, secondly how that master is transferred to the medium, for example a brilliant remastering can be ruined for vinyl if the pressing plant doesn't do its job properly.

CD tends to be cheaper, so might be the better bet but if you get a top remastering job and a first rate pressing then vinyl could be your best bet.
I feel like CDs are a lot less durable. The LP isn't so expensive, but the Discogs shipping is 20 - same price at the LP!
 

Revolutions

Well-known member
Aug 6, 2023
631
671
1,270
Visit site
I’m sure Pod would say 24bit.

The randomly discovered Gram Parsons live show that was released for RSD this year sounds terrible, even with specific treatment to try and make it sound less terrible.

Go CD. Vinyl too expensive to waste on poor quality, distorted audio imo.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Gray and DougK1

Gray

Well-known member
I feel like CDs are a lot less durable.
Do you?
Nothing (but a laser beam) has ever touched the playing surface of any of mine.
Never scratched one, never had one go faulty (some are 4 decades old).
Having said that, I've got older vinyl with no obvious sign of wear.
Of course, with the wrong care, anything can be vulnerable.

As for your concert, I'd be surprised if they actually took it off air from the broadcast - but from what you say, they may have done 🤔
.....if so,there could quite possibly have been those, with very decent FM tuners / reel to reel decks in 1975 - that may have versions of the event every bit as good (or even better) than either the current CD or vinyl can provide.
 

SloRick

Well-known member
Mar 5, 2022
36
10
1,545
Visit site
Do you?
Nothing (but a laser beam) has ever touched the playing surface of any of mine.
Never scratched one, never had one go faulty (some are 4 decades old).
Having said that, I've got older vinyl with no obvious sign of wear.
Of course, with the wrong care, anything can be vulnerable.

As for your concert, I'd be surprised if they actually took it off air from the broadcast - but from what you say, they may have done 🤔
.....if so,there could quite possibly have been those, with very decent FM tuners / reel to reel decks in 1975 - that may have versions of the event every bit as good (or even better) than either the current CD or vinyl can provide.
not what I'm saying - it's how they sell it. I honestly have no idea. You can listen on YouTube and it sounds fine.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Gray
It says:
Klondike proudly presents the entire original KMET-FM broadcast of Toots and The Maytals live in Los Angeles from The Roxy on 1st October 1975.

Professionally re-mastered original broadcast with background liners and rare archival photos
Digitally remastered for enhanced sound quality
A lot of ‘vintage’ classical music is captured that way too, whether from rare radio broadcasts or shellac discs. Remastering in this sense is essential because the original source isn’t a master tape made in studio conditions but an amateur recording from the radio - or maybe a backup tape at the original radio station.

The remastering will make it as good as it can be, and thereafter it’s entirely dependent on whether both LP and CD are made from that remastering, or whether further tweaks are made (e.g. it is common to mono the bass on LPs to reduce groove skipping).

If you want a 1975 vibe then obviously LP is the thing, but I struggle to see how the sound will be better than from a CD.
 
  • Like
Reactions: DougK1 and Gray

Fandango Andy

Well-known member
From what I glean elsewhere is that recent vinyl has a higher dynamic range than the same CD. Why that is I don't know.

What I also glean from my ears is that dynamic range has been a somewhat exaggerated facet of sound quality.
When you say higher do you mean greater/larger/wider? Or do you mean vinyl is cut louder. All modern remasters seem to have less dynamic range than older versions regardless of format. I don't have many modern vinyl records to compare as all of mine are old, however if vinyl is being mastered with more dynamic range it could be because most people spending new vinyl prices are going to listen on a half decent hifi. CD (which is probably the same master as streaming services use) has to cover a wider variety of devices including earbuds, in car, and little Bluetooth speakers. With full dynamic range some recordings could go from inaudible to deafening.
 

Rodolfo

Well-known member
Jul 31, 2023
230
108
470
Visit site
I feel like CDs are a lot less durable. The LP isn't so expensive, but the Discogs shipping is 20 - same price at the LP!
My experience is the opposite based on collections from the '80s. It's true that a CD can go completely bad -won't play (I've had 2 or 3 ; ~/< 1%); but as wholes, most all CDs play as new, while a meaningful fraction of LPs do not.

I love my new CDs -mostly gifts. But I'd get the CD, especially for a shipped re-whatever option.

Enjoy the music on whichever medium you select!

-----
This assumes that your turntable, etc. and your player are equally good.
 

manicm

Well-known member
When you say higher do you mean greater/larger/wider? Or do you mean vinyl is cut louder. All modern remasters seem to have less dynamic range than older versions regardless of format. I don't have many modern vinyl records to compare as all of mine are old, however if vinyl is being mastered with more dynamic range it could be because most people spending new vinyl prices are going to listen on a half decent hifi. CD (which is probably the same master as streaming services use) has to cover a wider variety of devices including earbuds, in car, and little Bluetooth speakers. With full dynamic range some recordings could go from inaudible to deafening.

I meant wider
 
  • Like
Reactions: Fandango Andy

WhiteKnight2020

Well-known member
Feb 27, 2020
13
6
4,525
Visit site
A lot of ‘vintage’ classical music is captured that way too, whether from rare radio broadcasts or shellac discs. Remastering in this sense is essential because the original source isn’t a master tape made in studio conditions but an amateur recording from the radio - or maybe a backup tape at the original radio station.

The remastering will make it as good as it can be, and thereafter it’s entirely dependent on whether both LP and CD are made from that remastering, or whether further tweaks are made (e.g. it is common to mono the bass on LPs to reduce groove skipping).

If you want a 1975 vibe then obviously LP is the thing, but I struggle to see how the sound will be better than from a CD.
It also depends on whether there are separate masterings for CD and vinyl and then who cuts the lacquer for the vinyl.
 

TRENDING THREADS

Latest posts