• If you ever spot Spam (either in the forums, or received via forum direct message) please use the Report button at the bottom of each post to make sure a Moderator can handle it quickly. Thanks for your help in keeping things running smoothly!

Question Denon DP-400 or DP-450 turntables

Philap

Member
Sep 22, 2020
4
0
20
They are seducing but I could not find any review in What-Hifi.
How do they sound? Any owner?
 

Al ears

Moderator
It does look a tad cheap and cheerful, does not even say what cartridge is fitted. May be useful if you have any old 78rpm albums. Perhaps money would be better spent elsewhere.
 

Philap

Member
Sep 22, 2020
4
0
20
It does look a tad cheap and cheerful, does not even say what cartridge is fitted. May be useful if you have any old 78rpm albums. Perhaps money would be better spent elsewhere.
I do have 78 rpm records but will I listen to them?
 

iMark

Well-known member
May 16, 2008
236
53
18,870
78s are a completely different kettle of fish. You will need a different cartridge to play them. Switching cartridges is not easy on most record players, even if they have a 78 setting.
 

Al ears

Moderator
78s are a completely different kettle of fish. You will need a different cartridge to play them. Switching cartridges is not easy on most record players, even if they have a 78 setting.
Not necessarily. Although preferably most simple elliptical styli that come fitted to cheap turntables will play a 78 speed LP. The fact that most of them are mono may then need a different cartridge.
 

daytona600

Well-known member
Oct 5, 2012
251
127
19,070
2nd hand technics SL1200 or Reloop RP2000
Supplied ortofon 0.7mil stylus for 33/45 & 3.0mil stylus for 78rpm
or add a 2nd ortofon true mono cartridge
plug in head shell & change cartridges for stereo & mono

nb - do not use the mono on stereo records this will cause damage
33/45 have a V shaped groove & 78s have a wider U shaped groove
also speed control/variable pitch as 78rpm was a guide speed

depending on record label common speeds 70/72/73/75/76/78/80/81/83/85 / 87 & 90rpm.
place strobe disc on platter adjust speed for best pitch & mark label on jacket for future replay at correct speed
if you have a large collection 1.0/2.0/2.5/3.0/3.5/4.0 stylus from Ortofon.

Due to the playback in the past of these very old records with very high stylus pressure or even
with steel needles a lot of damage has been caused to the grooves. This damage is
the cause of a lot of distortion and back-ground noise. Sometimes better results can
be achieved by playing the record either on a lower part or a higher part of the groove
which may have been damaged less than the average height.
To play-back at a higher
level, use either the 3.5 mil, 4.0 mil. To playback at a lower groove level use either
the 2.0 mil, or 2.5 mil tip. When you have found the best height affix a sticker to the
record so you will know the next time which stylus tip to use for best results.

In the early days the 78rpm records were cut with a decent tolerance, each label had its own "standard". Only later were the real industry standard of 78 revolutions per minute agreed. Older mechanical 78rpm record players therefore often had a speed-fine control because many older bakelite and shellac plates turned too fast or too slow. With this stroboscope you can determine exactly the optimum rotational speed per record .


205466_m.jpg
Modern Microgroove Records have a V profile Groove & Modern Mono Microgroove Re-issues
0.7mil is Suitable for Reissue Monaural LP and a Mono LP of after 1960.
1.0mil is Suitable for the Monaural LP of a deep groove of the first press of the 1950s.
However, both styli can trace the monaural LP of all generations without a problem.
When you listen to the monaural LP of all generations, we recommend 0.7mil.
When you listen to a monaural LP of the first press of the 1950s mainly, we recommend 1.0mil.
3.0mil usually ideal for 78rpm mono records
Why Mono ?
A mono cartridge is mechanically different from a stereo cartridge. Simply switching a stereo cartridge to mono does not work perfectly. Despite what manufactures claim mono switches invariably add the two channels by simply shorting the two channels together, even very" expensive units do this. Hiend units can sum the two channels with extra electronics to eliminates the vertical response and improve the signal to noise by 3dB. However even summing does not provide the ultimate, a cartridge designed for mono, with a single coil and no vertical movement reduces surface noise, vertical noise and fits the groove properly.
Older Mono records have a U type Groove Mono/78RPM 3.0mil is the accepted norm & Steel Needles for gramophone records
other types used by collectors are 2.0/2.5/3.0/3.5/4.0/8.0 ( MIL = 1/1000th of a inch )
2.0MIL - 2.0 X 0.4 mil Elliptical diamond - worn LPs, some transcriptions.
2.5MIL - 2.5 X 0.5 mil elliptical diamond - late unworn 78s
3.0MIL - 3.0 X 0.5 mil elliptical diamond - most 1905 to 1940's, slightly worn 78s & transcriptions, & some Edison discs.
3.5MIL 3.5 X 0.8 mil elliptical diamond - old or worn 78s, transcriptions.
4.0MIL 4.0 X 1.0 mil elliptical diamond - Edison Diamond & very old/worn discs, raw aluminium, RCA home recordings., also Pathé vertical discs
8.0MIL 8.0 mil conical sapphire - RCA home recordings, and worn Pathé vertical discs.

or RP7000/8000 digital output to archive records & computer speed control
View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IMZpgJ6qRI8
 
Last edited:

ASK THE COMMUNITY

TRENDING THREADS

Latest posts