why do my speaker cones seem to move far more when listeing to vinyl than cd?

matengawhat

Well-known member
Aug 17, 2007
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why do my speaker cones seem to move far more when listeing to vinyl than cd? they just seem to move in and out far more with vinyl even at the same volume - any ideas?
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
Because LPs often produce large amounts of energy below audibility (5-10Hz) which intermods with what you want to hear and spoils the sound. Some phono stages have an LF filter to reduce it.

Ash
 

Andrew Everard

New member
May 30, 2007
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Can be minute warps in the record causing the cartridge to bounce and thus create the movement of the cones. Worth checking the downforce on your cartridge with a stylus gauge such as this - it could be running a bit light.
 

chebby

Well-known member
Jun 2, 2008
1,245
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It may also be an isolation issue.

Ideally your turntable should be located away from the speakers (and not in their line of fire) to minimise floor-borne and airborne vibration feeding back through the turntable 'system'.

Turntables without sprung sub-chassis can be more prone to feedback ,especially if your speakers and your turntable are both sited on a suspended wooden floor.

If practical, try a wall mounted support for the turntable like this one from Project.

Rega also make a wall support that is a little more minimalist but only fits Rega turntables.

Optimally a wall support for a turntable should be mounted on a load bearing, masonry or brick wall.
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
Is this what's known in the business as 'cone flap'?
 

matengawhat

Well-known member
Aug 17, 2007
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is this dangerous to either the deck, the records or the speakers - have just altered the cartridge downforce and the vertical tracking but has made little difference
 

Tear Drop

New member
Apr 23, 2008
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No, it's not dangerous. I would suggest that it is partly an amplification issue. I have heard absolutely thunderous low frequencies from a couple of LP based systems at higher volume levels with relatively little movement from the drive units due to very high quality amps being used. Either way, I wouldn't worry about it.
 

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