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Speaker Problem

admin_exported

New member
Aug 10, 2019
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I seem to be getting a buzzing coming from one of my speakers. It's not the amp as I swapped the conections round to check and the buzzing still happened in the same speaker. It only happens at certain points of songs. Is there anything I can do to sort this out? Or am I going to need to send the speaker back to the manufacturer for repairs?
 

Andrew Everard

New member
May 30, 2007
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Your description suggests it's a mechanical problem in the speaker that's buzzing: there's nothing active in there that could cause a electronic buzz, and the swapping of the connections rules out the amp or source components. Does the buzz occur at certain frequencies or at very high levels?

The most probable cause is a rubbing voice-coil, a damaged cone surround or maybe even a loose driver fixing: if you have a speaker with visible screws on the front, you could try - very carefully - tightening them slightly, as they tend to work loose with extended enthusaistic use.

Make sure you have the right size of screwdriver or Torx/Hex bit, and be careful not to let it slip: it's all too easy to damage a drive unit with an accidental slip. I'd advise holding the shaft of the screwdriver with one hand while turning it with the other, just to be on the safe side.

If the fixings are tight, and the rubber surround on the bass unit is intact, the most likely cause is a rubbing voice-coil in one of the drivers, usually the result of damage caused by too much level and distortion causing some melting of the wires in the coil. Have you been caning the speakers?

Listen closely to the speaker, and you should soon be able to identify which driver is buzzing

If this is the case, a new driver will put things right - it's best if you change the drivers as a pair, so if it's the bass unit you should change the driver in both speakers. The speaker manufacturer or your local retailer should be able to advise you of the cost.
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
I have a similar problem and have found one of my cones is seperated from its chassis. Unfortuneately these speakers are Castle Howards S3 and are not made anymore I believe. Castle built their own components. I have been using two pairs in tandem - originally bought for two seperate rooms and the result has been very pleasing. I live in Malta which is not well served - or not really served at all for even mi-fi. Our rooms are quite sizeable, ceilings high, over 4m, room volume where the speakers live is over 200 cu. m. and building is monolithic - surfaces are hard, though there are no noticeable sympathetic resonances. (thank God) My valve pre-stage amplifier by Musical Fidelity delivers just enough power and a satisfying full sound in these circumstances - also an awfull lot of unwanted heat when it's 40deg outside.

Now I have had to unhook one pair and the sound is very disappointing by comparison. Is it possible to glue the cone back to its rubber mount which is not perished? It seems to have been a glue fault in the first place. I am reasonably adept at such things, I do furniture restoration and such. Obviously any glue must have the bonding capacity with what appears to be neoprene and must remain permanently flexible. I was thinking of trying a very thin coat of Wurth Bond Seal, and turning a shaped disk to rest on the glued area whilst the glue cures.

I live in the middle of a village so I never drive the speakers very hard.

Any advice? I'd hate to throw away a pair of Castle Howards, and here - I would replace them with what?

annibalepreca
 

Pete Shields

Well-known member
Sep 23, 2008
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18,590
Andrew Everard:

"The most probable cause is a rubbing voice-coil, a damaged cone surround or maybe even a loose driver fixing: if you have a speaker with visible screws on the front, you could try - very carefully - tightening them slightly, as they tend to work loose with extended enthusaistic use."

Decided to take a look at my 16 year old Mission 751's. Took the grilles off probably the first time in ten years - all still in good working order. looked at the driver fixing screws and they all had a good turn in them. Should they be tight or should they have any play at all in them?

I've just tightened them all one turn, and will check how they sound over the weekend.
 

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