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Jazzland

Vladimir

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Dec 26, 2013
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Welcome jazz cats. Let's lay out some tunes, shall we?



Composer, theorist, arranger, and pianist George Russell debuted his 14-part master composition "Electronic Sonata for Souls Loved By Nature" on April 28, 1969, at a concert in Norway. The ambitious, elaborate work blended bebop, free, Asian, and blues elements, as well as electronic effects, and mixed live performance with tape and vocal segments. It was a testimony to the prowess of trumpeter Manfred Schoof, tenor saxophonist Jan Garbarek, guitarist Terje Rypdal, bassist Red Mitchell, and drummer John Christensen that they weren't overwhelmed by the sheer weight of the experience. The digital mastering enables listeners to fully hear the disparate styles converging, and understand just how advanced Russell's concepts were, particularly for the time. While not everything worked, the composition ranks alongside Ornette Coleman's "Free Jazz" as one of jazz's finest, most adventurous pieces.
 
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Vladimir

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Dec 26, 2013
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Blacksabbath25 said:
sorry Vladimar

not really into jazz but if it was blue's classic rock , metal i could help *smile*
Checkout jazz fusion metal bands Planet X or Liquid Tension Experiment (Dream Theater bandmembers John Petrucci, Jordan Rudess and Mike Portnoy, as well as bassist Tony Levin). All that is kitten lullaby music compared to John Dikeman's Cactus Truck.

*dirol*
 

DocG

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May 1, 2012
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My current favourite album: Kenny Barron and Charlie Haden's Night and the City. Recorded live in the Iridium Jazz Club in NYC, in 1996. 'Twilight Song' starts with a minimalistic piano intro, but the rest of the album is very 'easy listening', with brilliant interplay between the two virtuosi. The 'you are there' feeling is enhanced by the (rather prominent) background noise, of people eating and drinking during the gig.

Recommended late night listening. Spotify here.

 

Vladimir

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Dec 26, 2013
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Looking at the wiki article on Iridium Jazz Club where it was recorded.

According to New York magazine, "the Iridium does its best to recreate the halcyon days of the 1920s and 1930s. Sure, the air’s no longer smoky, the décor’s a shadow of what it was and you’re sitting knee-to-knee with the European tourists at the next table, but true jazz aficionados overlook those minor details to hear sets played by some of the best-known names in the biz: vocalist Jimmy Scott, guitarist Mike Stern, saxophonist Pharoah Sanders, and the Mingus Legacy bands, to name a few."
 

friendly_ghost

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May 8, 2014
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For someone relatively new to jazz, let me say I applaud this thread and I hope it will have a very long life indeed!

Breaking through here in Belgium and very progressive: STUFF!
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WOYshmLW_YM

They're amazing live as well, but might be to electronic for some peoples taste.
 

Vladimir

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Dec 26, 2013
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friendly_ghost said:
For someone relatively new to jazz, let me say I applaud this thread and I hope it will have a very long life indeed!

Breaking through here in Belgium and very progressive: STUFF!https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WOYshmLW_YM

They're amazing live as well, but might be to electronic for some peoples taste.
Sweet gig. I sense a Weather Report influence.
 

friendly_ghost

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May 8, 2014
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Vladimir said:
Good morning jazzophiles!

Pianist Brad Mehldau's debut as a leader features his straight-ahead style in trios with either Larry Grenadier or Christian McBride on bass and Jorge Rossy or Brian Blade on drums. The well-rounded set is highlighted by tasteful and swinging versions of five standards (including John Coltrane's "Countdown," "It Might As Well Be Spring," and "From This Moment On") and four of the pianist's originals.

London Blues
Saw these guys live last month, great musicians!
The new album is very good as well!
 

Vladimir

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Dec 26, 2013
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Look into the ECM Records catalogue and the work of Manfred Eicher as a record producer. It's not available through streamers, only CDs. It has everything you want.

For starters try these.

Keith Jarrett: Koln Concert / Paris Concert / Sun Bear Concerts

Arvo Pärt: Tabula Rasa

Manu Katché: Neighbourhood

John Surman: The Amazing Adventures of Simon Simon

Nik Bärtsch's Ronin: Llyrìa

Steve Reich: Music for 18 Musicians

Jan Garbarek: Dresden: In Concert
 

Vladimir

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Dec 26, 2013
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friendly_ghost said:
Vladimir said:
Good morning jazzophiles!

Pianist Brad Mehldau's debut as a leader features his straight-ahead style in trios with either Larry Grenadier or Christian McBride on bass and Jorge Rossy or Brian Blade on drums. The well-rounded set is highlighted by tasteful and swinging versions of five standards (including John Coltrane's "Countdown," "It Might As Well Be Spring," and "From This Moment On") and four of the pianist's originals.

London Blues
Saw these guys live last month, great musicians!The new album is very good as well!
A mix of jazz and bluegrass, cool.



It's twangy.
 

Vladimir

New member
Dec 26, 2013
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Like 1999's Voice in the Night, The Water Is Wide features Charles Lloyd in the company of one of his dearest friends, drummer Billy Higgins, who would pass away less than a year after the album's release. Guitarist John Abercrombie also remains on board, but Lloyd extends the group's generational span by recruiting two younger players: pianist Brad Mehldau and bassist Larry Grenadier.



The Water is Wide
 

Electro

Well-known member
Mar 30, 2011
43
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18,545
friendly_ghost said:
For someone relatively new to jazz, let me say I applaud this thread and I hope it will have a very long life indeed!

Breaking through here in Belgium and very progressive: STUFF!https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WOYshmLW_YM

They're amazing live as well, but might be to electronic for some peoples taste.
I love this ! It's definintely my sort of Stuff. *smile*
 

ChrisIRL

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Apr 12, 2014
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Lincoln Center Jazz Orchestra - Live in Swing City, Swingin' with Duke.

Amazing live recording, full of energy!
 

Vladimir

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Dec 26, 2013
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ChrisIRL said:
Lincoln Center Jazz Orchestra - Live in Swing City, Swingin' with Duke.

Amazing live recording, full of energy!
Oh man that jam has a fierce take off. *help**music2*

 

Vladimir

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Dec 26, 2013
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The Vanguard Jazz Orchestra continues the tradition of excellence that was the core ingredient when it began life as the Thad Jones-Mel Lewis Orchestra during the 1960s. Now led by pianist/conductor/composer/arranger Jim McNeely, the band brings life to his stimulating charts with tight ensembles and strong solos throughout the session. The first track is a bit of a surprise, a breezy jazz setting of rocker Jimi Hendrix's "Up from the Skies" that is a good bit more harmonically adventurous than the original record.



Up from the Skies
 

Vladimir

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Dec 26, 2013
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CnoEvil said:
This is my contribution:



Oliver Nelson would gain his greatest fame later in his short life as an arranger/composer, but this superior session puts the emphasis on his distinctive tenor and alto playing. In a slightly unusual group (with vibraphonist Lem Winchester, organist Johnny "Hammond" Smith, bassist George Tucker, and drummer Roy Haynes), Nelson improvises a variety of well-constructed but spontaneous solos; his unaccompanied spots on "All the Way" and his hard-charging playing on the medium-tempo blues "Groove" are two of the many highpoints. Nelson remains a vastly underrated saxophonist and all six performances (four of them his originals) are excellent.
 

Vladimir

New member
Dec 26, 2013
220
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Good morning jazzophiles!



Pianist Brad Mehldau's debut as a leader features his straight-ahead style in trios with either Larry Grenadier or Christian McBride on bass and Jorge Rossy or Brian Blade on drums. The well-rounded set is highlighted by tasteful and swinging versions of five standards (including John Coltrane's "Countdown," "It Might As Well Be Spring," and "From This Moment On") and four of the pianist's originals.

London Blues
 

Vladimir

New member
Dec 26, 2013
220
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A superstar jazz matchup, The Bad Plus Joshua Redman features maverick trio the Bad Plus joined by acclaimed jazz saxophonist Joshua Redman. Recorded after the group's weeklong stint at New York's Blue Note jazz club in 2012, the album is an organic collaboration between Redman and Bad Plus members pianist Ethan Iverson, bassist Reid Anderson, and drummer Dave King.



Largely known for their genre-bending compositional take on jazz, here the Bad Plus take a more improvisational, open-ended approach to group interplay. Conversely, Redman, an adroit, long-form improviser, finds new avenues of jazz expression within the context of this new group sound. Ultimately, The Bad Plus Joshua Redman sounds less like a collaboration between two separate entities and more like the assured work of a unified band.

Dirty Blonde
 

Vladimir

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Dec 26, 2013
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This CD brings back a formerly rare set by Warne Marsh, plus seven classic performances that serve as the high point of Lennie Tristano's career. Oddly enough, the Tristano date is programmed second. First is a full-length album which matches Warne Marsh with the cooler but complementary tone of fellow tenor Ted Brown (plus pianist Ronnie Ball, bassist George Tucker, and drummer Jeff Morton). The original eight selections are joined by four alternate takes recorded in mono. Marsh and Brown blend together well, Ball has several creative solos, and most of the "originals" are based closely on familiar standards. However, the main reason to acquire this CD is for the seven remarkable Tristano tracks which feature his finest group (consisting of the pianist/leader, altoist Lee Konitz, Marsh on tenor, guitarist Billy Bauer, bassist Arnold Fishkin, and either Harold Granowsky or Denzil Best on drums).



Tristano's music was unique and even more advanced than most bop of the late '40s. While he confined the rhythm section to very quiet timekeeping, the vibrato-less horns and Tristano himself played very long melodic lines, constantly improvising. The stunning unisons performed by Konitz and Marsh (particularly on "Wow") still sound remarkable today, as does the interplay of the two horns on "Sax of a Kind." "Intuition" and "Digression" were the first recorded free improvisations in jazz, but are quite coherent due to the musicians' familiarity with each other. Due to the Lennie Tristano performances, this CD reissue (which has over 75 minutes of music) is essential for all jazz collections.

Intuition

Small bonus track: Lennie Tristano - Crosscurrent (1949)
 

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