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CD Burning Questions

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Gray

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Nov 27, 2015
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I didn't think so.....
.....jj thinks so (in post #21) and it's understandable why he thinks so too.
Let's face it, Clark actually wrote, 'a CDR made from FLAC files'
He's right that FLAC files were used to make the CDR and jj is right to think that he meant FLAC files were on the CDR!!!
Is it any wonder that Noobs go away more confused than ever?

PS...in fairness to Clark, he did try earlier in the thread to explain what he meant.
 
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iMark

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May 16, 2008
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If you burn FLAC or ALAC files to CDR will automatically be expanded to WAV or AIFF. This type of uncompressed PCM is the only type that conforms to the Redbook CD standard. Before you can use your files in iTunes you have to convert them from FLAC to ALAC (Apple Lossless). This is from one lossless format to another lossless format.

One of the easiest ways ever to burn CDs ever I discovered years ago while using iTunes. You make a playlist of the tracks you want to burn to the CD. You then right click on that playlist and choose "Burn playlist to disc". You then enter setting for burning your CD. I wouldn't burn at maximum speed to avoid writing errors. I think you will get great results with the following settings:
Screenshot 2020-07-16 at 15.39.11.png

You can also burn MP3s and AACs to CD if you include them in a playlist. They will sound like the original files (not CD quality) but they play in any CD player. This from the days when storage was expensive and people didn't rip to a lossless format.

Burning a CD from a ripped CD is quite a neat trick to get a CD with CD Text to use in a car. It's also a good idea to take copies in the car rather than the originals.

Obviously the files on a CDR are no longer FLAC (or ALAC). They've been losslessly expanded to uncompressed PCM files and will show as WAV on Windows computer of AIFF on a Mac.
 

Gray

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Nov 27, 2015
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If you burn FLAC or ALAC files to CDR will automatically be expanded to WAV or AIFF.
Yes iMark when, as you say, the software has been instructed to burn whatever files you've dragged and dropped, to a redbook standard audio CD format.
But you will of course agree that FLAC can be burned as FLAC to CDR right?
 

ClarkNovember

Well-known member
May 24, 2009
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I think the confusion here is probably because hardly anyone burns CDs anymore.

But as stated above, if you burn an audio CD from FLAC files, the CDR doesn't have FLAC files on it. It is an audio CD (Redbook) that even Naim players will recognise.

If you create a data CD from FLAC files then that's a different story.
 
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Al ears

Moderator
.....jj thinks so (in post #21) and it's understandable why he thinks so too.
Let's face it, Clark actually wrote, 'a CDR made from FLAC files'
He's right that FLAC files were used to make the CDR and jj is right to think that he meant FLAC files were on the CDR!!!
Is it any wonder that Noobs go away more confused than ever?

PS...in fairness to Clark, he did try earlier in the thread to explain what he meant.
Having re-read it you may very well be right.
Easy to misread some first posts I understand.
It's not surprising that threads gain length rapidly before anyone actually answers any questions posed but nothing new there.
 

manicm

Well-known member
May 1, 2008
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1. Actually, just as you can create a CD with MP3 files, so can you create a CD with FLAC files.

2. Let’s assume he wants to play his ripped vinyl in the car, then a CD with Flacs won’t work, so then just write WAVs which will create a normal music CD.

3. So what he actually wants to do is to correctly rip to FLAC - and safeguard them to a portable drive, and perform 2. above for car and home CD duty.
 

ClarkNovember

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May 24, 2009
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1. Actually, just as you can create a CD with MP3 files, so can you create a CD with FLAC files.

2. Let’s assume he wants to play his ripped vinyl in the car, then a CD with Flacs won’t work, so then just write WAVs which will create a normal music CD.

3. So what he actually wants to do is to correctly rip to FLAC - and safeguard them to a portable drive, and perform 2. above for car and home CD duty.
No you’re just making the same error that has been stated throughout this thread. It’s the difference between a data CD containing FLAC, WAV or mp3 and an audio CD which is something else.

Creating an audio CD is not ‘writing to WAV’. If you write to an audio CD using FLAC files, you will get the same results as using WAV files.

As iMark says:

Obviously the files on a CDR are no longer FLAC (or ALAC). They've been losslessly expanded to uncompressed PCM files and will show as WAV on Windows computer of AIFF on a Mac.
 
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ClarkNovember

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May 24, 2009
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@ClarkNovember, just as you can create a data cd with MP3 files, you can create a data cd with FLAC files - and they won’t be converted as, again I state, it will be a data cd.
Yes that’s what I’ve been saying. People are getting confused between the two.

The OP wanted advice on creating audio CDs that would play on any device. The very act of creating an audio CD makes it an audio CD, not a data CD. Therefore, the audio CD can be made directly from FLAC files, or WAV files or (not recommended) mp3 files. There is no need or benefit to convert to WAV first.

I think the confusion then comes from people talking about data CDs (which can contain WAV, FLAC or mp3). Different kettle of fish and a lot more variability in terms of what devices will play them.


Audio CDs
There are two main types of CDs that you can create with CD burning software: audio CDs and data CDs.

  • To ensure that you create a CD that will play anywhere it is important to choose the option to burn an "Audio CD" or "Music CD" and not a "Data CD". A data CD containing for example MP3 or WAV files will play happily on your computer but is unlikely to play in a standalone CD player or in-car CD player (note that some modern CD players will play data CDs). An audio CD will play on any standalone or in-car CD player and in your computer and in modern DVD players.
Audio CDs do not have files or a file system like data CDs and other computer storage media, but consist essentially of a stream of bits on the disc in a single spiral "track" with a TOC (Table of Contents) index.
  • Audio CDs are generally limited to 74 minutes playing time on a 650 MB disc ("Red Book Standard") or 80 minutes on a 700 MB disc.
  • When buying blank CDs for burning, it is strongly recommended that you purchase good quality CD-Rs (that can be burnt just once) and not the rewritable CD-RWs.
 

Al ears

Moderator
Perhaps, rather than arguing the toss about who's right and who's wrong it might be nice for a newbie to see someone who can be bothered to answer the questions he posed.
Just say'n like....
 

Al ears

Moderator
Yes that’s what I’ve been saying. People are getting confused between the two.

The OP wanted advice on creating audio CDs that would play on any device. The very act of creating an audio CD makes it an audio CD, not a data CD. Therefore, the audio CD can be made directly from FLAC files, or WAV files or (not recommended) mp3 files. There is no need or benefit to convert to WAV first.

I think the confusion then comes from people talking about data CDs (which can contain WAV, FLAC or mp3). Different kettle of fish and a lot more variability in terms of what devices will play them.
You're correct but the OP wants to end up with a CD he can play in any device, be it car or a CDP, perhaps you could answer as to whether a CD-R discs with FLAC format files on it can be played thus.....
 

ClarkNovember

Well-known member
May 24, 2009
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You're correct but the OP wants to end up with a CD he can play in any device, be it car or a CDP, perhaps you could answer as to whether a CD-R discs with FLAC format files on it can be played thus.....
again you are confusing the two things. An audio CD burned from FLAC is not ‘a CD-R disc with FLAC format files’ as you state.

and it seemed like the OP was happy with the replies on page 1...
 

Al ears

Moderator
again you are confusing the two things. An audio CD burned from FLAC is not ‘a CD-R disc with FLAC format files’ as you state.

and it seemed like the OP was happy with the replies on page 1...
Point taken, you're saying if he burns those FLAC files he has onto a CD-R then that disc will play in any device yes?
 

ClarkNovember

Well-known member
May 24, 2009
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Point taken, you're saying if he burns those FLAC files he has onto a CD-R then that disc will play in any device yes?
As long as it is to create and audio CD, then yes. If he burnt any format (FLAC, WAV, MP3) to a data CD then device compatibility is more complicated.

“Audacity Website” said:
To ensure that you create a CD that will play anywhere it is important to choose the option to burn an "Audio CD" or "Music CD" and not a "Data CD".
 

oldcastle

Active member
Jul 15, 2020
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Yeah... I can see i'm not the only one confused here :D

@ClarkNovember is right. When I said that I want my CD to play everywhere, I meant "normal" CD players. And not only CD players that can play DATA files like mp3.

The reason I'm doing this is just to preserver my collection and to have more mobility. So, going back to my questions this is what i learned so far.

1) Plextor premium is a very good audio cd writer, but not easy to find. LG and lite-on can be an option

2) It's clear now. I need to burn it as Audio and not data.

3) Taiyo Yuden, JVC are highly recommended, specially the ones made in Japan.

4) Burn at low speed. Burn audio discs in Disc-At-Once (DAO) mode at constant linear velocity (CLV).
 
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Gray

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It's clear enough really isn't it?
A Redbook audio CD can only be WAV.
That's what the OP wants and that's what he'll get when he clicks the option to 'create an AUDIO CD'
He"s also been told that most (if not all) audio CD players will play such discs.

It's true that some old players refused to consistently play burned discs - despite the fact that they had been correctly made to the Redbook standard - but only because of the different reflectivity of recordable discs. Later lasers cured that problem.

CDR / Ws were governed by the Orange book standards. But let's forget that!
 

Gray

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Nov 27, 2015
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Yeah... I can see i'm not the only one confused here :D

@ClarkNovember is right. When I said that I want my CD to play everywhere, I meant "normal" CD players. And not only CD players that can play DATA files like mp3.

The reason I'm doing this is just to preserver my collection and to have more mobility. So, going back to my questions this is what i learned so far.

1) Plextor premium is a very good audio cd writer, but not easy to find. LG and lite-on can be an option

2) It's clear now. I need to burn it as Audio and not data.

3) Taiyo Yuden, JVC are highly recommended, specially the ones made in Japan.

4) Burn at low speed. Burn audio discs in Disc-At-Once (DAO) mode at constant linear velocity (CLV).
You've got it spot on Oldcastle 👍
You may see something like '52x' written on the disc, but stick to lower speeds. (No coincidence that my Philips audio CD recorder only uses the single, real time speed).

PS: Assuming you fill the disc, your audio data is actually more than 3.5 miles long.
 
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iMark

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May 16, 2008
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Like others have said, the OP was asking about Audio CD. That's why I showed a settings picture for burning an Audio CD.

I have burned 100s of audio CDs over the years so I do know what I'm talking about.
 
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Gray

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.....I have burned 100s of audio CDs over the years
Me too.
Of course, when it came to using EAC to rip them to FLAC, none of my unique compilations were recognised - meaning totally manual metadata entry was necessary 😀
(A 'first world problem's if ever there was one).
 

DougK

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Dec 8, 2013
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Me too.
Of course, when it came to using EAC to rip them to FLAC, none of my unique compilations were recognised - meaning totally manual metadata entry was necessary 😀
(A 'first world problem's if ever there was one).
That's one reason why I don't do unique compilations :LOL: Rip first, construct unique afterwards...
 
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Gray

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That's one reason why I don't do unique compilations :LOL: Rip first, construct unique afterwards...
Yes, I recorded loads of discs, 20+ years before I first owned a computer.
As Clark says, no real need now for most people to burn permanently to disc anyway.
...pretty sure my old car CDP can't play recordables and never listen to music while driving any more either.
 

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