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14 bit 40 khz

bubobubo

New member
Nov 9, 2016
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i feel instead of going up in bits and freqency i feel is better in fact to goes down *biggrin*

if we record digital we dont need all the bits to cash the analogue wave

Dynamic range, is the range of volume between the noise floor and the maximum volume.

The only difference between 16bit and 24bit is 48dB of dynamic range (8bits x 6dB = 48dB)

So, can you actually hear any benefits of the larger 48dB dynamic range no you can't. The entire dynamic range of some types of music is sometimes less than 12dB. The recordings with the largest dynamic range tend to be symphony orchestra recordings but even these virtually never have a dynamic range greater than about 60dB. So even 96 db of the cd is over all that data.

14 bit should be then 84 db more than enough when around 60dB is the most dynamic range you will find on a commercial recording.

Even a recording with 60dB dynamic range is only using 10bits of data, the other 6bits on a CD are just noise. So instead we should focus to make a new way to storage the digital music and try to take away 2 bits of noise and try to make the other 4 bits more musical than noised

we almost dont listen more than 17 khz and maximun 20 khz, so 40khz is the half then more than enought:

ps. the information i had get from internet
 

chebby

Well-known member
Jun 2, 2008
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It's been done - for over three decades - with BBC FM radio distribution (in 14 bit NICAM-3) on a massive scale from 1983 until a year ago.

Up until 1983 the BBC's digital distribution of FM radio had been 13 bit PCM.
 

audiventory

New member
Jan 13, 2014
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bubobubo said:
Dynamic range, is the range of volume between the noise floor and the maximum volume.

The only difference between 16bit and 24bit is 48dB of dynamic range (8bits x 6dB = 48dB) So, can you actually hear any benefits of the larger 48dB dynamic range no you can't.
Sound quality may defined by signal/noise ratio (SNR).

Signal with maximal amplitude 0 dB have SNR 144 dB= 0 - 144 (for 24 bit). It is not technically correct, but we can take it to a first approximation.

If you consider minimal signal as -144 dB, this signal have SNR 0dB. There is not useful signal. Thus taking of -144 dB as minimal signal is impossible.

Let’s take analog sources as base: comfortable noise level is -60 dB. If we want comfortable playback at low levels (quiet places of a musical piece), we may provide 60 dB reserve for minimal signal when dynamic range calculated.

Thus minimal signal is 84 dB = -144 dB + 60 dB.

And dynamic range for 24 bit is 84 dB = 0 - (-84) by this methodic.

It is more complex issues, than I described here, and some things in this post is hypothesis only.
 

MajorFubar

New member
Mar 3, 2010
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First world worries. Just accept that 16 bit 44kHz has enough redundancy in both dynamic range and frequency response for you never to need anything better, instead of wondering how low you can feasibly go for no reason whatsoever. But to indulge you just a little, the earliest sampler I used in my home studio recorded just 8-bit samples, yet it's amazing what you could get away with in the context of a mix, especially with bass lines and drum samples (cymbals and hi-hats were trickier).

The only major headache the CD standard left its developers with is they invented something which didn't ever need to be improved. And as a business model that's catastrophic.
 

audiventory

New member
Jan 13, 2014
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MajorFubar said:
Just accept that 16 bit 44kHz has enough redundancy in both dynamic range and frequency response for you never to need anything better, instead of wondering how low you can feasibly go for no reason whatsoever.
44 kHz is enough. For ideal theoretical device.

44 100 Hz sample rate provide 2050 Hz transient band for analog filter.

Analog filter provide about 48 dB per octave.

Thus 20 000 Hz is 0 dB, 20050 Hz is -4.46 dB (48dB / 22050Hz * 2050Hz).

The filter should be applied into analog digital converter for recording. I.e. using 44100 Hz for capturing 20000 Hz cause about -5 dB suppressing aliases in audible range.

There no mystics and myths. Simple calculations. If modern analog filters provide steeper suppression we can re-calculate.

About 8-bit

It is noise floor matter only.

In DSD used 1-bit resolution. But there applied noise shaping (pushing quantization noise far to ultrasound area). So higher sample rates is price for lower bit-depth and keeping noise level.
 

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