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value for money how important is it ?

flashgordon1952

Active member
Dec 16, 2019
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when I see the various prices of the larger TVs ! for a 65 inch or more ! I see prices from Hisense of under £600 plus warranty of 3 years to the latest QLED from Samsung at £2500 .
1. is there that difference in quality of picture and sound to warrant that price difference
To me unless you want a Home Cinema experience which in fact would cost even more ! that means a purpose built room ! and a top notch sound system costing probably thousands on top i personally think it is just trying to keep up the the guy next door ! ).
2 I get the impression on the very serious guys would spend £2k on the speakers and probably another £2k on amps and then you have to sound proof the room too would i not be wrong here ?
3. Living in a one bedroom ground floor flat forbides me in doing this ! ie thin walls !
so i found a solution ! which is actually quite cheap ! Go next door and watch there 90 inch TV experience in there own sound proof dungeon ! only one problem as i found out i did not like . His Tv with his 4000 watt sound system speakers and amp ! the noise was deafening ! everything vibrated including the chair ! he had 3D too. the amp he had huge bulbs in them the sort we use in Amateur radio amps. $500 each to replace ! Everytime i spoke to him he said "ah" yes he was deaf from the blasts. why do people do it ?
 
The cheapest of anything is going to have been made as cheaply as possible from the cheapest components available, with very little real R&D to optimise the product. A soundbar is entry level into “home theatre” (I put home theatre in inverted commas because a soundbar isn’t real home theatre)l then you move into the realms of multiple speakers and a budget AV receiver. Then we have the high quality home theatre amplifiers and pre/powers, and lastly, the serious stuff, which really requires a dedicated room. Where you want to be in the grand scheme of things is up to you, which may well be dictated by budget or desire. Between those four classifications, there’s big differences. Some people are quite happy watching movies using a soundbar, but others want the whole experience - they want to see it, they want to feel it - they want to feel like they’re sitting in a cinema at home. How loud you have it is up to you, but comfortable listening levels will be governed by the quality of the system and it’s ability to reproduce cleanly what you ask it to.

The £600 Hisense will technically have the same resolution as any TV, including those that cost several thousand pounds, but it won’t have anywhere near the quality of upscaling a good TV will have (necessary for converting lower resolution DVD, Bluray, and TV broadcasts up to 4K and showing them in full screen mode). It’ll be made with parts that are as mass produced as mass produced can get, and quite possibly, with very little quality control - some manufacturers take a random sample after so many constructed to make sure quality is up to standard, whereas manufacturers of low cost items won’t. Because of the quality of components used, a simple, clean picture which should look pristine can look a little noisy, or not have correct colour representation. Any minute cost saving exercises can affect long term (or even short term) reliability.

When you say “sound proof”, do you mean sound proofing, as in making sure sound doesn’t escape the room, or do you mean acoustic treatment, which makes sure the equipment performs at its best? Opinions will be split, but you don’t have to spend a fortune on room treatment unless the room is acoustically diabolical. It’s all down to choosing the right speaker system for the room in the first place. The room EQ on the AV amplifier or receiver will help tidy things up.

A good quality, well set up system shouldn’t reward you with deafness.
 
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abacus

Well-known member
Sep 24, 2008
401
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19,070
Value for money just means you have something that does all that you want at a price you can afford.
If you are a general user then a cheap 65" TV will do all you they need, so it is excellent value for money for you.
If you want a better picture quality (You are a more serious viewer) then a cheap TV will be poor value for money as it will not be up to the standard you want. (Thus you will be happy to spend more to get better value for your money)
If you want the best and money is no object, then £50,000 (Or pretty much any price) would be good value for
money for you.
The above brings us back to the first sentence, so just get whatever floats your boat, as that will be your value for money.

Bill
 
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Brek

Well-known member
Nov 12, 2011
14
3
18,525
Value will always be a perceived and relative term, although there is a difference in performance from premium products compared to the brands like hisense, and others. I would always stick to the main brands because I k ow their pedigree. There is also a point of diminishing returns on really high end gear. I discovered a neat trick few years back thanks to the credit crunch, buy high end gear used, its the best value there is. I had a new onkyo 609 reciever I thought I was happy with until I got home a yammy 1030 aventage, the difference was staggering (I paid £200 for it). All those airyfairy terms whathifi reviews used like ‘steered the effects with aplomb’ suddenly made sense. you don’t have to listen at reference levels to enjoy either like your neighbour does. I would generally not buy speakers used though, as you have no idea how much abuse they might have taken from being played beyond theirs or the amplifiers abilities. I have just spent £1500 on a brand new LG 65B9PLA I am not sure if value for money was a consideration in the decision, I wanted a certain level of performance from my new scree, and will expect 10 years out of it. That for me is the upper limit of what I would spend on a TV though.
 

flashgordon1952

Active member
Dec 16, 2019
22
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25
I buy s/h from either Ebay or a charity shop ! Bought three PLASMA 43/42/46 kept the two Panasonic one of which has a Satellite tuner. so able to switch over to three satellite s when need to. I am unlikely to get another LCD or whatever while I can get a PLASMA . and they do last a long time both of mine are 9 years and 10 years old great picture
 

flashgordon1952

Active member
Dec 16, 2019
22
0
25
I am a fan off Hisense as they are very cheap compared with ie 4k 8k OLEDs but you need to get a 3 year warranty on them as they tend not to last very long. then again I know someone who paid 3k for a Samsung 75 inch job and failed to work after 6 months
 

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