There is hardly any difference between my OLED and QLED

Freddy

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Try watching in a dark room and from a slight angle! 😉
There still not much in it. The OLED is slightly blacker whereas the QLED is slightly brighter. Even when you see the comparison videos on HDTVTest on YouTube there still isn’t much in it.
 

Freddy

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That's why I keep maintaining; there's no point in wasting money on upgrading perfectly functional TVs.
Yep, correct. Looking back buying the LG OLED TV wasn’t one of my best ideas! I suppose I had to see it in person though. No more of those type of purchases.
 

Edbostan

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The subtle differences I could see when comparing the Samsung Qled to my LG OLED was my OLED was better for contrast, shadow details, uniformity, and motion.
They look good in the showroom being fed 8k or 4k signal from a dedicated source. Get them home and the compressed signal fed from terrestrial, satellite or fibre sources levels out any technical advantage. I can happily watch and enjoy black and white films without worrying about specification hype.
 

Stuart.W.D

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They look good in the showroom being fed 8k or 4k signal from a dedicated source. Get them home and the compressed signal fed from terrestrial, satellite or fibre sources levels out any technical advantage.
I see no improvement with 8K over 4K streams to be honest. Most cable TV channels are at least HD today, so it's not hard to find a modern, with a high-performance TV set. I mostly watch Amazon Prime, and other streaming platforms and the performance is great for me. LG, and Sony do a tremendous job with upscaling images. TV settings are usually the culprit to a poor performance.

Retail stores purposely tune TV sets to look as bright as possible to get your attention by raising the brightness level of the set on the shop floor. At a glance, the picture of the TV will then look so bright and sharp that you will want to bring the TV home.
But here’s the problem if you look at the in-store set for more than a couple of minutes, you will notice that the detail is fuzzy. It occurs when the luminance level is too high on your TV. You will also see more blooming leakage in the black bars etc.

You can get a much better picture out of your TV by calibrating it. I have the software and tools to do this to my TVs, which really improves the shadow details as the OLED panels have black crush issues from the out of the box settings which leads to a loss of shadow detail. A proper calibration will iron out colours as well for a better overall image to remove a tint or hue from the TV panel.
 
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Edbostan

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I see no improvement with 8K over 4K streams to be honest. Most cable TV channels are at least HD today, so it's not hard to find a modern, with a high-performance TV set. I mostly watch Amazon Prime, and other streaming platforms and the performance is great for me. LG, and Sony do a tremendous job with upscaling images. TV settings are usually the culprit to a poor performance.

Retail stores purposely tune TV sets to look as bright as possible to get your attention by raising the brightness level of the set on the shop floor. At a glance, the picture of the TV will then look so bright and sharp that you will want to bring the TV home.
But here’s the problem if you look at the in-store set for more than a couple of minutes, you will notice that the detail is fuzzy. It occurs when the luminance level is too high on your TV. You will also see more blooming leakage in the black bars etc.

You can get a much better picture out of your TV by calibrating it. I have the software and tools to do this to my TVs, which really improves the shadow details as the OLED panels have black crush issues from the out of the box settings which leads to a loss of shadow detail. A proper calibration will iron out colours as well for a better overall image to remove a tint or hue from the TV panel.
Yes. At the factory TVs are defaulted to Dynamic and Vivid picture settings. When you get your TV home go into picture settings and select Normal or other options. Then there are the contrast, brightness and sharpness controls which can be adjusted to suit you personally.
 
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Stuart.W.D

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Yes. At the factory TVs are defaulted to Dynamic and Vivid picture settings. When you get your TV home go into picture settings and select Normal or other options. Then there are the contrast, brightness and sharpness controls which can be adjusted to suit you personally.
What you really want is Calman software and a colour meter to adjust your TV for accuracy if you have a mid to high end TV. ⬇


And a colour metre such as the X-Rite-i1Display-Pro- via Amazon.

Another option I recommend that is significantly cheaper. If your TV has Filmmaker mode, then use a test pattern to adjust the OLED Light or backlight on your LED to adjust to the room conditions in your room environment.

I believe day and night modes are also important for picture presets.

Value Electronic does it well, unfortunately they are American based. ⬇

View: https://youtu.be/4-wEBfRMJg0
 

flashgordon1952

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It is a game of offering a new spec to get the buyer to spend money QLED vs OLED vs UHD vs god knows what comes next. Ideally should be 4k UHD that is a minimum now. Forget all those other letter after that 8 k who wants it and few transmission and downloads are in 8k and only if you have a huge screen too. And those screen sizes up 55 there is no point what so ever having 8k or QLED at all . Not until get to 65 plus then might see a difference in the quality of the picture (might)
72 and 90 yes but off course if the transmission is in ordinary non 4k ie a old film will not make any difference what so ever . Sport ? well a 100 hz TV be a good idea Pointless having a 4k UHD at 60 hz the higher the "hz" the better the action is . maybe 200 hz ideal for big screens. But does Sky transmit in over 60 hz , they may in footie Netflix is 60 hz my Sky dish is 50 hz? i think or is it 60hz . But that is too 2011 PLASMA TV which runs at 60 hz. .
And the other problem lies where the hell you put that huge screen oh the wall . why the wall ?
Because the screen is too big otherwise and has to be seen at over 5 meters . Do you guys want to have the biggest screen in the road. to show off what you have got there?
Prices of Chinese made stuff is at throw away prices now TCL and Hisense make a 55 at d £350 at 55 inches UHD 4k Even Hisense top of the range with everything including the new generation screens at £850 for the 2022 model ( or less) this is suppose to be better than QLED .
But there is always a guy who want to beat his neighbour on who has the biggest and bestm. It is called keeping up with the Jonses.( same for cars gardens and holidays
 

flashgordon1952

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it still ask the question is it worth the extra money ? maybe if have a big screen but now the QLED been replaced by even more expensive screen . This gets me worried why spend a fortune on a TV that be out of date in 2 years or even a years time . By the Tv when it get replaced by this new , whatever it is as they be trying to get rid of them , Note the new Samsung . There has to be a point in price where simply not worth getting the latest "in thing" simply because it is the latest in thing. What better paying out ie £500 or £1200 knowing the more expensive one will be out of date in say 2/3 years time Comparing ie 65 inch TVs or even 70 inch wall mounted gear. This also leads me to ask why so big a screen .
It has to be wall mounted and should only be watched at further than a certain distance in the house hold , and unless you have a huge room or a cinema room it is pointless getting the far more expensive 70 inch when a 55 inch will do just as good and cheaper at the normal height.
I reckon to watch a 70 inch have to be at least 15 ft away maybe further . We have a 46 inch Tv and we are 8ft away from it . That is about right to me .
So buying a 50 or 55inch would save at least £300 to 700 in the cost depending on the make and model Hisense 55 inch is £350 but there new 65 inch is £800 which one is the better buy / the 50 inch is better noting the prices of a refurbished 75 inch ULTRA older model is £700 compares with the latest 75 at £1300 new standard ULTRA models 2021 are around £799 and 899.
The new Ultra 55 are around £800 ish The old model 2020 55 inch is £299 with 2 year warranty Note TCL are better TVs why spend so much on a TV when you have to replace it in 2 years as it be out of date Yes we have Ultra now UHD 4k etc but this will be replaced next year , anyway LOOK AT THE PRICES
 
Comparing ie 65 inch TVs or even 70 inch wall mounted gear. This also leads me to ask why so big a screen .
It has to be wall mounted and should only be watched at further than a certain distance in the house hold , and unless you have a huge room or a cinema room it is pointless getting the far more expensive 70 inch when a 55 inch will do just as good and cheaper at the normal height.
I reckon to watch a 70 inch have to be at least 15 ft away maybe further . We have a 46 inch Tv and we are 8ft away from it . That is about right to me .
I sit 9 feet away from my 75-inch TV that's on a stand, and it's absolutely perfect. Bigger the screen, better it is. Your eyes get used to it pretty quickly. Watching movies is spectacular.
 

flashgordon1952

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I sit 9 feet away from my 75-inch TV that's on a stand, and it's absolutely perfect. Bigger the screen, better it is. Your eyes get used to it pretty quickly. Watching movies is spectacular.
Think 9ft is too close yes your eyes do get use to it but i always take advice on a manufacturers advice on distance to watch . They do these tests advisory . Off Course you can ignore this advice or advice from "spec savers" As you guys know not a fan of wall mounting there are a number of reason 1 paper walls unless a brick wall i would not fit a 72inch on any wall , but on a big table at a certain height recommended by the manufacture 2. distance is important from the wall 3 heat build up the amount of guys who fit that TV over a fire or radiator why there ? the worse place to fit one and will damage a TV and could well lose months of good use , by putting it there . This is the reason why i say you should not put it on any wall. . Do you really need a 70 or 65 inch TV or is it simply to impress next doors 55 inch ? 50 to 55 is well big enough for the vast majority of rooms . By the way i was offered a 108 inch Plasma last year for £250 worked great So heavy would need a crane and using 600 watts plus plus to drive it
 
Think 9ft is too close yes your eyes do get use to it but i always take advice on a manufacturers advice on distance to watch . They do these tests advisory . Off Course you can ignore this advice or advice from "spec savers"
Of course, you follow manufacturers' recommended viewing distance.

My TV is a Sony, and Sony recommends viewing distance of 4.59 feet for a 75-inch 4K TV.


Not many people have caught up with the fact that one of the biggest advantages of higher resolution screens is reduced viewing distance.

Here's my TV on a TV unit.

20201125_160802.jpg

Modern TVs are much lighter than older generation models. My 75-inch TV is 32.9kg. They don't generate heat as much either.

It's not about showing off. Genuine enjoyment comes from watching films on bigger screens. Why would cinemas exist otherwise?
 
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The recommended distance for watching a 4K TV is 1.5 times the TV's vertical screen size.

PTV_ViewingDistance4K.PNG

The naked eye can't differentiate individual pixels when watching a 4K TV from this distance. This means that pixels effectively disappear when viewing 4K images. Thus, creating an impression of watching the image with the same detail and resolution as real life.

Check the table below for further details about the recommended viewing distance when watching a 4K TV.

TV size Viewing distance range (approx.)
43 inch- 35 inches (2.95 feet)
49 inch- 39 inches (3.28 feet)
55 inch- 39 inches (3.28 feet)
65 inch- 47 inches (3.94 feet)
75 inch- 55 inches (4.59 feet)
85 inch- 63 inches (5.25 feet)
 
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flashgordon1952

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The only problem of being so close to the TV is that you likely to block other people from seeing the screen and these distances are crazy and seriously too short . No point have i have ever seen people around a tv ,watching the TV that close 50 inch PLASMA minimum 7ft 6ins meters in my case Those distances quoted are just sheer crazy and dangerous . I certainly not seen any recommended Manufacturers advising those distances . I am pretty sure no Opticians would not either . have a feeling those distances are in fact height above ground to watch ( hence big screens tend to be on a wall . Who is right the opticians or the manufacture ? I do not have a home cinema ( flat is too small for one thing 14 ft x 10ft bedroom and a little bigger for main and only lounge i just have 2 cheap s/h PLASMA 46 Panasonic 2010 model and the rare 3D 2011 50 inch model. which if people know the actual total size of the TV is 6 inches wider all round. and about 3 times the weight too . There is no doubt the bigger the screen the more pixels you need hence UHD 4k QLED or what ever. . For normal people use a 42 50 or even a 55 is ideal to use for everyday use. Not everyone in my view should simply buy a 72 or a 75 inch just because next door has bought a new car or a massive Tv. More often than not a big screen is simply unsuitable . Why do you have to keep up with the Jones family next door. Perhaps towards that huge increase in gas bills might help . Think before you buy. And on credit ? Well i am totally against all credit myself as i do not have a credit card nor want one. deals there are deals with 0% APR keep an eye on these they not always the bargain you think. More often its an older model they trying to selloff. Try to neg a deal in cash, Dont accept the first price. they give if have cash. They love cash . How much is that 72 inch 2020 model £1000 can we do a deal it is a old model and sitting there in the warehouse since ,whenever. Can i speak to manager ? ( often these guys are on a commision ) okay sir £950 if you take it now and we offer a pair of £60 head pones or free HDMI gold cables
 
The naked eye can't differentiate individual pixels when watching a 4K TV from this distance. This means that pixels effectively disappear when viewing 4K images. Thus, creating an impression of watching the image with the same detail and resolution as real life.
I'm curious about how my screen would look when viewing more closely, but am not sure I can be bothered to move the room around - seating position must be 4.5m away.

I guess these distances rely on always watching 4k, as opposed to upscaled images. HD upscales pretty well, but is obviously less good than UHD, and SD upscaled varies massively.
 
I'm curious about how my screen would look when viewing more closely, but am not sure I can be bothered to move the room around - seating position must be 4.5m away.

I guess these distances rely on always watching 4k, as opposed to upscaled images. HD upscales pretty well, but is obviously less good than UHD, and SD upscaled varies massively.
You can always increase the size of your TV ;)
 
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I like the logic - it will mean having to rearrange things considerably, but I have a hankering for a bigger set when they come down to something approximating to sensible prices. Big pain is going to be relocating the hifi rack, which I am loathe to do...
 
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Freddy

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Comparing a flagship Samsung QLED 8K model which is definitely Improved over the 4K models eg more dimming zones and better blacks and contrast against a LG OLED it’s hard to see the differences you guys talk about. And the QLED has no screen burn and vastly brighter screen. My QLED is my main TV now for sure.

539BAACB-FF2A-473C-8DD3-BF80AA30AB55.png
 
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