Which sand is best to fill speaker stands?

Pistol Pete1

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Jan 27, 2008
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What sand is best for filling speaker stands, or does it not matter? Is it the best material to use, or is 'shot' better?

Anyone got any advise?

Cheers...................
 
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Anonymous

Guest
Best is kiln dried sand from Wickes, B&Q don't sell it. They are about £3 a huge bag. Then if you want to be even more sure you could also dry it further in the oven.

Shot is better but harder to find + risk of lead poisoning so would need to be in sealed bags and many stands don't allow this because they only have small filling holes.

Atacama Soundbytes are good but costly, you'll need a tub per stand, so £35+
 
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Anonymous

Guest
I'm sure that would be fine but it doesn't say the weight/quantity of the bags, or do my eyes deceive me?

You could use that stuff/Soundbytes with sand as well to make it more dense, and then fill to about 3/4 of the height of the stand. I found it does tighten the bass a tad, many people rave about it while others dismiss it.
 

Pistol Pete1

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Jan 27, 2008
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Cool.....

Have you tried granite tiles/slabs? Had Tannoy DC2000's and put them on granite - wow what a difference!!! Much tighter bass and seemed to improve clarity too.

The speakers are for sale now, so have the q acoustics 1010i 5.1 speaker package but want to get best out of front pair which are used for music playback too. Sand and granite tiles will do that, I hope..........

Thanks for your help.......
 
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Anonymous

Guest
Yer I've got my front channels on chopping boards from Asda. There much beefier and heavier than the ones you get at Tesco that everyone raves about. Saying that I consider them aesthetical only...

Looked into getting some custom Lakeland slate ones made but they were gonna cost £90, so I popped for the Asda ones for £9 each!
 

Pike900fish

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Jun 23, 2008
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Pistol Pete1:

Cool.....

Have you tried granite tiles/slabs? Had Tannoy DC2000's and put them on granite - wow what a difference!!! Much tighter bass and seemed to improve clarity too.

The speakers are for sale now, so have the q acoustics 1010i 5.1 speaker package but want to get best out of front pair which are used for music playback too. Sand and granite tiles will do that, I hope..........

Thanks for your help.......

Agree with Octopo on this one. I have my stands spiked onto half patio slabs then on top of a half carpet tiles as I have laminate flooring. I too feel that the bass is tightened and a noticeable improvement in clarity. Also, I can slide them around into different positions eg closer to wall with bass light music or farther out if too much booming.

I have been toying with filling my Atacamas for some time and probably will try the kiln sand first. Atabites are too expensive IMO.

Good Luck!
 

Pike900fish

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Jun 23, 2008
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professorhat:Pike900fish:Atabites are too expensive IMO. Yeah, but a lot easier to clean up when you need to take them out!
 
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Anonymous

Guest
The key thing is the sand must be absolutly dry. Those who suggested further oven drying are spot on.

Also I'd be tempted to use washed silver sand if you can find it as it's pretty inert and pH neutral. Most builders sand has a far from neutral pH so there is a chance of it corroding the stand over time. But drying the sand out is the key thing.
 

gpi

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Mar 29, 2008
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welshboy:
The key thing is the sand must be absolutly dry. Those who suggested further oven drying are spot on.

Also I'd be tempted to use washed silver sand if you can find it as it's pretty inert and pH neutral. Most builders sand has a far from neutral pH so there is a chance of it corroding the stand over time. But drying the sand out is the key thing.

No need if you buy the sand for block paving as it's dry enough to pour straight through a funnel. I bought a bag of children's play sand first because of advice and it was too damp to go through the funnel.
 
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Anonymous

Guest
gpi:welshboy:
The key thing is the sand must be absolutly dry. Those who suggested further oven drying are spot on.

Also I'd be tempted to use washed silver sand if you can find it as it's pretty inert and pH neutral. Most builders sand has a far from neutral pH so there is a chance of it corroding the stand over time. But drying the sand out is the key thing.

No need if you buy the sand for block paving as it's dry enough to pour straight through a funnel. I bought a bag of children's play sand first because of advice and it was too damp to go through the funnel.

You don't want any moisture in your stands at all or they will rust!!!
 

professorhat

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Dec 28, 2007
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Pike900fish:
professorhat:Pike900fish:Atabites are too expensive IMO. Yeah, but a lot easier to clean up when you need to take them out!


More than likely when you're first filling them, you'll want to experiment with how much you fill them with. At some point therefore, you'll probably put too much in and will want to remove a little as it sounds better.
 
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Anonymous

Guest
I'd be careful of the sand sold to set block paving. (It's designed to be a brush in product that locks the paving together.) Due to it's intended use it can tend to clump and be hard to remove.
 

daveh75

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Jul 31, 2008
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welshboy:

I'd be careful of the sand sold to set block paving. (It's designed to be a brush in product that locks the paving together.) Due to it's intended use it can tend to clump and be hard to remove.

agreed,and dont quote me on this, but it probably doesnt have as greater mass as other types either as its so fine,
 
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Anonymous

Guest
daveh75:
agreed,and dont quote me on this, but it probably doesnt have as greater mass as other types either as its so fine,

The finer the better as it will pack down, so there will be less gaps filled with air...
 

Pike900fish

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Jun 23, 2008
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professorhat:Pike900fish:

professorhat:Pike900fish:Atabites are too expensive IMO. Yeah, but a lot easier to clean up when you need to take them out!


More than likely when you're first filling them, you'll want to experiment with how much you fill them with. At some point therefore, you'll probably put too much in and will want to remove a little as it sounds better.

Sorry and excuse my ignorance on this one. I didn't realise you add enough sand to taste or to tune to ones own liking. See, I thought the whole point was to make the stand as solid as possible. When I flick my stands they "ping" due to being hollow which i guess would cause them to vibrate thus degrading the sound? By filling them completely shouldn't this make them as vibration free (or sound resonating) as possible?

I have both a radiator and metal gas fire in my listening room and for serious listening I cover these with old sheeting to reduce any reflecting the sound. (I MUST STATE, WHEN I COVER THESE HEATING APPLIANCES THEY ARE NOT ON!!!)
 
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Anonymous

Guest
What you say won't make a difference, especially if the stands are welded. You want to make the stands have a low centre of gravity so it's harder for the speaker to move, that's why you don't fill it to the top.
 
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Anonymous

Guest
Custom Design sell an inert filler that you can use too. Bag for a fiver or 8 bags for 30 quid. Maybe worth a look....

Customdesign.co.uk (under accessories).
 

gpi

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Mar 29, 2008
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welshboy:
I'd be careful of the sand sold to set block paving. (It's designed to be a brush in product that locks the paving together.) Due to it's intended use it can tend to clump and be hard to remove.

It did the job perfectly for me. I can't see a time I'm ever going to empty the stands and they are sealed (so no air or moisture will make the sand 'clump or adversely affect it') so job done. I think some people are reading into this too much.
 

professorhat

Well-known member
Dec 28, 2007
991
21
18,895
Pike900fish:professorhat:Pike900fish:

professorhat:Pike900fish:Atabites are too expensive IMO. Yeah, but a lot easier to clean up when you need to take them out!


More than likely when you're first filling them, you'll want to experiment with how much you fill them with. At some point therefore, you'll probably put too much in and will want to remove a little as it sounds better.

Sorry and excuse my ignorance on this one. I didn't realise you add enough sand to taste or to tune to ones own liking. See, I thought the whole point was to make the stand as solid as possible. When I flick my stands they "ping" due to being hollow which i guess would cause them to vibrate thus degrading the sound? By filling them completely shouldn't this make them as vibration free (or sound resonating) as possible?

I have both a radiator and metal gas fire in my listening room and for serious listening I cover these with old sheeting to reduce any reflecting the sound. (I MUST STATE, WHEN I COVER THESE HEATING APPLIANCES THEY ARE NOT ON!!!)

Can't argue on the physics of it, all I know is, I only filled mine to just over 3/4s full as, when they were full, they didn't sound as good. Hence why I had to take some out.
 
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Anonymous

Guest
gpi:welshboy:

I'd be careful of the sand sold to set block paving. (It's designed to be a brush in product that locks the paving together.) Due to it's intended use it can tend to clump and be hard to remove.

It did the job perfectly for me. I can't see a time I'm ever going to empty the stands and they are sealed (so no air or moisture will make the sand 'clump or adversely affect it') so job done. I think some people are reading into this too much.

If it works for you then that's great. I won't bore you with the chemistry and physics which relates to what I said earlier. If starting from scratch I'd still use silver sand if sand is the chosen filler and I'd oven dry it myself as well. I am sure that those products made specifically for this task are also a good choice.

Thankfully I use floorstanders so I don't have this problem.
 
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Anonymous

Guest
welshboy:
Thankfully I use floorstanders so I don't have this problem.

Never thought about filling them up?ÿ
 

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