Wharfedale Evo 4.2 - A Story Of Love & Heartbreak (Powered by Cambridge Audio CXA 81)

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AJM1981

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Mar 26, 2021
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Agreed. I actually have mine with two subs (with room correction) and it’s perfect for me. I actually don’t find the treble ‘softened’ just not harsh….as so many speakers are! I can listen to baroque violin for example without my ears bleeding……😁
That is perhaps a better description. :)

I just like that little extra touch in the upper region to kind of extra freshen the ride cymbals a bit for the lower volumes. But it is subtle, not a leap.

I have been interested in the Wharfedale Elysian in standmount format, though not in a way to actually get them someday due to their size. I think the 4.2s are fairly easy to move around and versatile in output, probably my last set of speakers ever for the living. As I think by this point and in this form factor about everything that could be in it, is in it.
 
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Tinman1952

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May 19, 2021
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That is perhaps a better description. :)

I just like that little extra touch in the upper region to kind of extra freshen the ride cymbals a bit for the lower volumes. But it is subtle, not a leap.

I have been interested in the Wharfedale Elysian in standmount format, though not in a way to actually get them someday due to their size. I think the 4.2s are fairly easy to move around and versatile in output, probably my last set of speakers ever for the living. As I think by this point and in this form factor about everything that could be in it, is in it.
Yeah the Elysian 2 are nice…if I ever win the lottery! 😁
I’m very happy with the Evo 4.2. The problem for me was getting the right stands. HiFi racks Duo were too high and too wobbly…I needed 44cm stands 🤔 In the end I bought the Wharfedale Linton stands…the correct height and rock solid! 👍
 
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AJM1981

Well-known member
Mar 26, 2021
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370
Yeah the Elysian 2 are nice…if I ever win the lottery! 😁
I’m very happy with the Evo 4.2. The problem for me was getting the right stands. HiFi racks Duo were too high and too wobbly…I needed 44cm stands 🤔 In the end I bought the Wharfedale Linton stands…the correct height and rock solid! 👍
Excellent

I have the Norstone Alva stands. More a style choice than stability thing, altough they are fine. They are quite uniform with my oak model of the 4.2s and blend well in with the piece of TV furniture which is also black and oak.

It kind of surprised me that there is probably just enough, but relatively speaking not that much choice in stands.
 
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CheshirePete

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Oct 12, 2020
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There are a few important things

-These are 3 way standmounts
- They provide monitor quality hi-res audio
-They have headroom

I have to admit that the Evo 4.2s are a bit tamed down and signature speakers for 70s to 90s music, Jazz and about everything accoustic. Bass that lifts without being boomy and treble it is a bit softened. That is out of the box.

But given the format and the big amounts of headroom these speakers provide having the AMT tweeter and the solid domed midrange and the high resolutionm You can basically kraft any possible sound signature out of it with DSP without any effort and "emulate" other preferred speakers to what is reachable for a cabinet this format.

I personally like it with a sub for the little extra reach and support and a slight increase of treble to untame the tweeter a little without it becoming too bright. But you can go to greater lengths as these can be quite a chameleon.
Interesting to hear what you are doing with DSP, I have these speakers and have just bought a NAD C 658 with Dirac Live.

I have been having a play around with Dirac and am starting to get the sound signature I initially wanted.

I always wanted a large bookshelf speaker and can't really afford a pair of Harbeth's, so I am hoping these are going to fit the bill .... just need to learn more about Dirac live.
 
Interesting to hear what you are doing with DSP, I have these speakers and have just bought a NAD C 658 with Dirac Live.

I have been having a play around with Dirac and am starting to get the sound signature I initially wanted.

I always wanted a large bookshelf speaker and can't really afford a pair of Harbeth's, so I am hoping these are going to fit the bill .... just need to learn more about Dirac live.
If you need that sort of room correction you have the wrong speakers in my opinion
 

AJM1981

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Mar 26, 2021
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If you need that sort of room correction you have the wrong speakers in my opinion
I didnt write anything related to room correction, more about preference correction. In which I think reference in club speakers are a little difficult to reproduce for allround speakers. 'little extra punch' to one songs benefit can result in unwanted steroids for another.

Dsp on its own is great. I've read that especially owners of horn loaded speakers that took a lot of effort to control well in the past benefit hugely from DSP.

Actually I am not doing that much with it myself besides a minor thing like controlling the sub with my phone in some cases and give this tiny push in treble as mentioned but it doesn't make a huge difference. Any modern amp with dsp will give at least an extra general midrange control. Including a sub it makes up for 4 individual speaker units that can be individually controlled.

My message to the starter or this topic is that the Wharfedale Evo 4.2 holds up everything to tailor it around specific genres of music though no single speaker can be A and B or C at the same time. When I crank up my treble and bass and tune down the mids I might transform it into a more than great hiphop and Jungle/ Drum n Bass speaker because producers already tune down the midrange in those genres in general and I can double that effect . But then I want to play classical music and I should bypass everything. I requires too much tinkering around.

That is why I just love allround speakers that are able to transform to other signatures whereas someone with a dedicated speaker (like the JBL wave guided speaker that Whathifi reviewed) has a hard time to reach into anything else instead of Rock and dance music, simply because it is kind of hard wired to do that best. I like those speakers in their own right and they are great when someones playlist is all about a certain genre but they are not the ones I would choose when listening to music in general.
 
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GoodVibes

Well-known member
Jan 31, 2021
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There are a few important things

-These are 3 way standmounts
- They provide monitor quality hi-res audio
-They have headroom

I have to admit that the Evo 4.2s are a bit tamed down and signature speakers for 70s to 90s music, Jazz and about everything accoustic. Bass that lifts without being boomy and treble it is a bit softened. That is out of the box.

But given the format and the big amounts of headroom these speakers provide having the AMT tweeter and the solid domed midrange and the high resolutionm You can basically kraft any possible sound signature out of it with DSP without any effort and "emulate" other preferred speakers to what is reachable for a cabinet this format.

I personally like it with a sub for the little extra reach and support and a slight increase of treble to untame the tweeter a little without it becoming too bright. But you can go to greater lengths as these can be quite a chameleon.
Hi, thanks for your reply. I don't know much about DSP but I'm interested in finding out more. I'm also interested in pairing another amp with the 4.2's to see what can be gained. What amplifier do you have?
 

GoodVibes

Well-known member
Jan 31, 2021
35
3
45
I didnt write anything related to room correction, more about preference correction. In which I think reference in club speakers are a little difficult to reproduce for allround speakers. 'little extra punch' to one songs benefit can result in unwanted steroids for another.

Dsp on its own is great. I've read that especially owners of horn loaded speakers that took a lot of effort to control well in the past benefit hugely from DSP.

Actually I am not doing that much with it myself besides a minor thing like controlling the sub with my phone in some cases and give this tiny push in treble as mentioned but it doesn't make a huge difference. Any modern amp with dsp will give at least an extra general midrange control. Including a sub it makes up for 4 individual speaker units that can be individually controlled.

My message to the starter or this topic is that the Wharfedale Evo 4.2 holds up everything to tailor it around specific genres of music though no single speaker can be A and B or C at the same time. When I crank up my treble and bass and tune down the mids I might transform it into a more than great hiphop and Jungle/ Drum n Bass speaker because producers already tune down the midrange in those genres in general and I can double that effect . But then I want to play classical music and I should bypass everything. I requires too much tinkering around.

That is why I just love allround speakers that are able to transform to other signatures whereas someone with a dedicated speaker (like the JBL wave guided speaker that Whathifi reviewed) has a hard time to reach into anything else instead of Rock and dance music, simply because it is kind of hard wired to do that best. I like those speakers in their own right and they are great when someones playlist is all about a certain genre but they are not the ones I would choose when listening to music in general.
I now realise that due to my wide ranging tastes in music, I am not going to be able to get a speaker that does a fantastic job for all genres. I think my ideal speaker would have a lot of the traits of the wharfedales but with a bit more energy to them. I guess there would be a trade off somewhere along the line though.
 

AJM1981

Well-known member
Mar 26, 2021
206
50
370
Hi, thanks for your reply. I don't know much about DSP but I'm interested in finding out more. I'm also interested in pairing another amp with the 4.2's to see what can be gained. What amplifier do you have?
I use the Yamaha WXA-50 , which replaced my old Harman Kardon Amp really well.

In case when you are interested in getting a sub to get that extra punch in some styles, The B&W ASW608 is a great full sub in a small form factor. Does its job well for about any reasonable room for just this extra grounding in bass.

I know purists will probably reject the idea of controlling anything besides volume, but it fits to print. I won't say that I exploit the full posibilities of dsp but with a form factor like these 3 ways, you could tame it the way you like instead of what the general owners of that specific speaker like.
 
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AJM1981

Well-known member
Mar 26, 2021
206
50
370
I now realise that due to my wide ranging tastes in music, I am not going to be able to get a speaker that does a fantastic job for all genres. I think my ideal speaker would have a lot of the traits of the wharfedales but with a bit more energy to them. I guess there would be a trade off somewhere along the line though.
True

My old B&Ws 602/s3s were really fantastic with tracks by the likes of e.g. Massive attack. They would get that power in the bass just right. They were great for metal and rock too, but they overall got less right than the wharfedales.

Now I could tailor my wharfedales to perform equally to them, but I would also have to find a way to get rid of around 20 years in resolution improvement.
 
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