Samsung cashback deal: claim up to £500 when you buy a 2021 Neo QLED TV

kdbur

Well-known member
Dec 7, 2015
22
3
10,525
The refusal to include Dolby Vision is ludicrous and means I will never entertain spending money, on a Samsung TV.
 

kdbur

Well-known member
Dec 7, 2015
22
3
10,525
''Can’t you just watch it in HDR instead? ''

Not when we are talking about £6,0000, televisions, no...

Do you not think 'dolby vision' is better than standard HDR?
 
D

Deleted member 2457

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''Can’t you just watch it in HDR instead? ''

Not when we are talking about £6,0000, televisions, no...

Do you not think 'dolby vision' is better than standard HDR?
Having owned quite a few LG OLED TVs, in my opinion HDR is better than Dolby Vision from my experiences. The Dolby Vision 4K Blu-rays I own were very poor quality compared to the HDR version on the same LG OLED TV.
 
D

Deleted member 2457

Guest
''Can’t you just watch it in HDR instead? ''

Not when we are talking about £6,0000, televisions, no...

Do you not think 'dolby vision' is better than standard HDR?
Which Samsung are you looking at because I would never spend £6000 on a Samsung either?
 
D

Deleted member 2457

Guest
''Can’t you just watch it in HDR instead? ''

Not when we are talking about £6,0000, televisions, no...

Do you not think 'dolby vision' is better than standard HDR?
If you want a big expensive Samsung why not go for this one?


Put it in filmmaker mode you will be amply rewarded.
 

kdbur

Well-known member
Dec 7, 2015
22
3
10,525
Having owned quite a few LG OLED TVs, in my opinion HDR is better than Dolby Vision from my experiences. The Dolby Vision 4K Blu-rays I own were very poor quality compared to the HDR version on the same LG OLED TV.
 

kdbur

Well-known member
Dec 7, 2015
22
3
10,525
I have a Panasonic and I find streaming in dolby vision much better than HDR, only, content. I can tell when it is one or the other but I really cannot fathom how a maker of high level TV's can omit 'dolby vision' . I would excuse a maker omitting HDR10+ as there is not much content about. I would though, agree about the quality of some 4k blu rays, especially the 'restorations' which can be awful.
 
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Deleted member 2457

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I have a Panasonic and I find streaming in dolby vision much better than HDR, only, content. I can tell when it is one or the other but I really cannot fathom how a maker of high level TV's can omit 'dolby vision' . I would excuse a maker omitting HDR10+ as there is not much content about. I would though, agree about the quality of some 4k blu rays, especially the 'restorations' which can be awful.
I have been appreciating Dolby Vision on Apple TV on my dad’s LG 65C9 though. I understand with Netflix Dolby Vision is really good too. I had an LG 65E6 OLED which eventually got screenburn and I think I right in saying it was the first generation of Dolby Vision and the 4K Blu-rays were grainy with a few strange things going on. Steve Withers on AVF wont touch a Samsung either without Dolby Vision too. Although he really wants one! So he must be seeing good things with Dolby Vision too.

I have personally found HDR to be really good at all times though.
 

abacus

Well-known member
Sep 24, 2008
683
377
19,270
The reason for Dolby Vision is so that the HDR image is mapped to the limitations of the screen.

Most HDR films are 1000 nits with a few at 4000nits and maybe the odd one at 10,000 nits, now as OLED is limited to about 700nits (The new Sony OLEDs claim 1300nits (But tests have shown this is in Vivid mode with approx. 750nits in film mode) most Samsung upmarket QLED TVs easily achieve 1400nits in film mode so remapping (Dolby Vision) is not needed for the vast majority of HDR films.

Instead of looking for tick boxes on features, always try the TV out for yourself to see if the picture suits you, as in a lot of instances the features you believe you want are actually irrelevant.

Bill
 
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Deleted member 2457

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The reason for Dolby Vision is so that the HDR image is mapped to the limitations of the screen.

Most HDR films are 1000 nits with a few at 4000nits and maybe the odd one at 10,000 nits, now as OLED is limited to about 700nits (The new Sony OLEDs claim 1300nits (But tests have shown this is in Vivid mode with approx. 750nits in film mode) most Samsung upmarket QLED TVs easily achieve 1400nits in film mode so remapping (Dolby Vision) is not needed for the vast majority of HDR films.

Instead of looking for tick boxes on features, always try the TV out for yourself to see if the picture suits you, as in a lot of instances the features you believe you want are actually irrelevant.

Bill
Cheers Bill! That was excellent. (y)
 

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