Running in a DAC..Why???

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I got an Arcam rDAC kw with the rWand for my iPod, and of course have seen lots of refenrences to the need to 'run in' a DAC for 70+ hours. I'm just puzzled why this would be needed.

The Digital part of the DAC is surely just running a mathematical algorithm, which I can't imagine changes over time...?

The analogue part...well, I guess a signal/current (or something! ;) runs through these parts - but really, what changes here over use???

Just wondering if anyone really knows, if this is just an urban audio myth, or ???

I'm going to leave mine running continutally for several days. By Sunday evening it should have had it's 70 hours or so, so I'll guess I'll find out for myself if I can hear the difference! ;)

Mark
 
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Anonymous

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I think that a more likely explanation for changes in sound over this time is that you get used to the sound.
 

6th.replicant

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I'm only able to comment after hands-on experience - ahem! - but my rDAC sounded 'orrible out of the box - very plodding, with flabby bass.

Following advice from Arcam's tech dept, I ran-in the rDAC for one-week/100+ hours. And Arcam offered a full refund, if, after the run-in period, I couldn't hear any improvement.

During the run-in week I did not listen to the rDAC, therefore, it wouldn't be a case of my hearing becoming accustomed/"used to the sound".

After the week/100+ hours, the difference was marked: much tighter bass, with more pace and attack - don't ask me how or why the changes occurred, I've no idea.

FWIW, I didn't take up Arcam's refund offer...
 

AnotherJoe

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I cant think of any reason why you would need to run in a DAC. All it does is take a digital (usually binary) signal at a point in time and convert it to a analog voltage. Transistors do not need a break-in period, there are no moving parts.

Speakers may need to be run in to loosen the drivers, and old valve-style amps needed to be warmed up for the cathode heater to get to the optimum temperature. But DACs with ICs - no.
 

SteveR750

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AnotherJoe said:
I cant think of any reason why you would need to run in a DAC. All it does is take a digital (usually binary) signal at a point in time and convert it to a analog voltage. Transistors do not need a break-in period, there are no moving parts.

Speakers may need to be run in to loosen the drivers, and old valve-style amps needed to be warmed up for the cathode heater to get to the optimum temperature. But DACs with ICs - no.

You might want to take this up with Cyrus.... ;)
 

busb

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Jun 14, 2011
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My new M-DAC now sounds less harsh & jumpy after being used for nearly 100hrs. I cannot offer an explanation as to why. I'm also aware of the idea that it's us the listener who aclimatises. A bit of both perhaps. Chord suggest that my new digital coax cable needs running-in - I'm far more skeptical about that!
 

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