Rega Planar 3 slowing down

ck_uk

Active member
Jul 29, 2021
3
3
25
Hi all,

I have a Rega Planar 3 (RB300) which has started slowing down quite markedly, after only playing a few tracks.

The belt is fairly new, and I have just serviced the bearing as per the manufacturers guidelines, with the appropriate oil. However, this has made no difference.

I'm wondering if this fault could possibly be caused by an electrical component, which is failing due to a change in characteristics as the operational temperature begins to rise?

Just wondering if anyone has any ideas what I could try next?

Thanks in advance
 
Is the belt slipping or is the motor actually slowing?
use an alcohol wipe to clean the area on the sub-platter that the belt runs over and dust the belt itself in talcum powder.
The motor itself may be failing
 
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If the above doesn’t work, the belt may have stretched, so you could try putting it in hot water where it’ll expand - take it out and it will usually contract to its original size.
Wih Rega decks, it’s always worth giving the platter a helping hand when starting up the motor, as it’ll save natural wear and tear on the motor and belt.
 
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ck_uk

Active member
Jul 29, 2021
3
3
25
Hi all, thanks for the replies.

The belt is quite new, red silicone. I will try cleaning the surfaces as suggested.

I've tested the pulley tightness on the motor spindle and it seems rock solid.

Other than that, I can only think of removing the motor and testing somehow. I have a meter but not sure whether it will prove anything unless it's under load.
 
I never had an issue with the actual motor on my old Planar 3 however they used to be held in place by rubber bands and these tend to perish and fail over time. The newer models don't use this form of fitting but that's not your problem anyway.
 

ck_uk

Active member
Jul 29, 2021
3
3
25
Hi all

I resolved my issue with my rega slowing down, thought I'd share this.

The cause was actually a capacitor on the main board, which was evidenced by visible cracking on the surface. Apparently these break down over time, and I guess 30+ years is enough time!

I purchase a replacement, making sure to check it was the correct part (same microfarads etc), brought the old soldering iron out of retirement for one final mission, and worked like a charm. Total cost to fix was £4

Hope this helps others in future

Thanks again all

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