Radiohead producer Nigel Godrich is unimpressed by "rubbish" Dolby Atmos music, believing that "stereo is optimum"

manicm

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You get certain producers, because they've been primarily been involved with one band, who are stuck in their ways. What's good for Radiohead may not be good for others - case in point Roger Waters' Is This Really The Life We Want - I did not like the reductionist production by Godrich. He tried to pull a Rubin, and I did not really like it.
 

Friesiansam

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I agree with Godrich, music first, not tech and, stereo is great for music. If you go to a live gig, how often are there musicians above or behind you, unless you are standing on your head and facing the wrong way?
 

manicm

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I agree with Godrich, music first, not tech and, stereo is great for music. If you go to a live gig, how often are there musicians above or behind you, unless you are standing on your head and facing the wrong way?
But it's completely different in the studio, and there are better examples of music in Dolby Atmos, especially in classical.
 

Commish

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Sep 21, 2022
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There is a lot of truth in what Godrich says. Many people find it disconcerting (annoying, distracting, nauseating) to have musical instruments mixed to surround them during a performance. I do not want to sit in the middle of the orchestra, or a band during the performance, I want to have them playing in front as on a stage, while I am in the hall (with the reflected sound behind me).
The finest multi-channel music recordings I have experienced place me in an environment in which there is a natural sense of acoustic space.
 
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Sliced Bread

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So much Atmos music reminds me of early Stereo tracks where they had to *show* you they’re using stereo. Many Atmos tracks over uses the surround and height channels

*But some tracks are wonderful and use the format to create spacefor the music to breathe.
 
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Jaybird100

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Producer Nigel Godrich has shared his thoughts on some of the problems with Dolby Atmos music in a new interview, saying: "I think it’s all a bit of a bluff".

Radiohead producer Nigel Godrich is unimpressed by "rubbish" Dolby Atmos music, believing that "stereo is optimum" : Read more
I'm going to offer an opposing view to what Nigel Godrich says. While I'm not a fan of Atmos, I do find that music in 5.1, even 4.0, is more satisfying, at least to me, than plain, vanilla stereo. When the music is recorded, anywhere from 8 to 48 tracks are used. Trying to take all those different tracks, and trying to shoehorn all those sounds into the two channels of stereo, obviously not everything is going to fit without making the end result sound cluttered. The use of additional channels can allow more of the music that was recorded to be presented to the listener. If you have a mixing engineer who's savvy at mixing for surround, along with input from the artist or group, the results can be quite satisfying. More of the recorded music can reach the listener. True, sounds don't necessarily come from behind you in a live environment, but surround can also be used to create the ambiance of a live venue, the acoustics of a concert hall, the options are many. But to dismiss surround sound for music is, in my humble opinion, very short-sighted.
 
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Sliced Bread

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…surround can also be used to create the ambiance of a live venue, the acoustics of a concert hall, the options are many. But to dismiss surround sound for music is, in my humble opinion, very short-sighted.
Agreed. IMO the very best Atmos tracks I’ve heard are those which sound like well recorded stereo tracks. The extras channels are used subtly to open the soundstage and create space for the instruments.
When done well you don’t even realise it’s Atmos.
 
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lacuna

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I do enjoy the sound from my stereo system (Marantz 8200 w/Dali Oberon) but I still prefer music in surround, even when my receiver is just upmixing the stereo recording.
 

Jaybird100

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I do enjoy the sound from my stereo system (Marantz 8200 w/Dali Oberon) but I still prefer music in surround, even when my receiver is just upmixing the stereo recording.
Are you familiar with the Surround Master, from Involve Audio? It's the best matrix decoder/synthesizer I've ever heard. It's capable of creating a near-discrete surround effect from stereo recordings, as well as high-separation decoding of QS, SQ, EV, Dolby Surround, and Dynaquad. It can be added to any quad or home theater receiver that offers multichannel analog inputs. Check out Involveaudio.com for details about this unit. I use one, and it's the best audio purchase I've made in years.
 

seoman27

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Sep 25, 2022
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Funny. "When the hammond kicks in bla bla bla"
Wasn't hammond the first who tried to throw the sound around the room with the lesley speaker?
Mono and stereo could not catch that surround sound.
Only atmos/dts:x/auro3d are the platforms that can output the lesley as it was invented in the 40'ies
 
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