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Loudspeaker Dollies for Floorstanders

PAULCHRISTOPHER

New member
Dec 30, 2012
13
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Thanks for your very prompt reply. Could be the one with wheels .I have seen those on line also and there are some general dollies about 18 inches square like the 2 last pictues on this website

http://www.dollytrucks.co.uk/?gclid=CMj_x4rDtLwCFUQUwwodTRgAFA

Or I could make some myself with some thick plywood , fabric stapled on and 4 castors!

I suppose the thing to do is try it . The expense of making them myself wouldn't be too bad if they sounded bad.
 

PAULCHRISTOPHER

New member
Dec 30, 2012
13
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Sorry for duplicate post. My first post which I lost was:-

Good Morning

I have an awkward layout in my lounge and also to keep the wife happy I am considering mounting my Q Acoustics 2500i floorstanders on ready made dollies which are about 18 inches square and are on 3 inch nylon castors. The cable is Van Damme 2.5 sq in 5 metre lengths and so there should be no problems regarding stability or movability. The floor covering is carpet with concrete underneath and I would just remove the floorspikes and thumb screws and fasten the speaker steel foot to the wooden dolly with woodscrews. Has anybody on here done this or something similar. I am just concerned about whether it might affect sound quality. I suppose putting an extra layer of rubber or carpet tile between the two surfaces would not have much effect as any vibration or unwanted soundwaves would pass through the screws anyway. Screws are essential or our boisterous dog might topple the speakers. Any advice will be gratefully received. Thank you .

Paul
 

Sospri

New member
Mar 23, 2011
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I would not bother putting an extra layer of rubber between the 2 surfaces as the speakers need to be as stable as possible, otherwise I cannot see a problem with this idea..............
 

spiny norman

New member
Jan 14, 2009
293
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Apart from the dollies allowing the speakers to move about in response to music playing (remember Newton's 3rd Law), thus reducing the air-shifting ability of the drivers, cabinet vibrations no longer being grounded down to the floor and the dollies providing extra components to rattle along with the music, I can see no problems whatsoever with this idea.
 

davedotco

New member
Apr 24, 2013
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Sospri said:
I would not bother putting an extra layer of rubber between the 2 surfaces as the speakers need to be as stable as possible, otherwise I cannot see a problem with this idea..............
I really am in horror of the entire concept.

I am personally quite convinced that speakers need to be rigidly coupled to the floor, by years of practical experience installing speakers and systems in peoples homes. Quite why, I am at a loss to understand, and it does vary from speaker to speaker but it does appear to be important.

I have sold and installed systems where the customer has been dissapointed in a lack of focus and precision of the system in his home compared to the shop and in many cases this has been solved by mounting the speakers more rigidly, usually by driving screws into the floorboards and mounting the speaker spikes on the screw heads. (As was normal practice in the shop)

I can recall an occasion where a customer insisted that I come out and hear how poor his system was sounding, he was a nice bloke so I was happy to do so. The system sounded terrible, a brash, fractured quality overlayed everything but I fixed the problem while the chap was making a cup of tea, about 2-3 minutes.

The speakers had clearly been moved, in fact left and right had been swapped, they were not 'handed' in any way, both speaker/stand combination was identical but the screws in the floor were not, quite. The spikes on the stands were supposed to fit in to the 'crosses' on the screwheads (that were driven into the floorboards) but they were loose and rattling. Swap left and right over, settle the spikes firmly in the screwheads and by the time we were sitting down with our tea the problem was solved.
 

PAULCHRISTOPHER

New member
Dec 30, 2012
13
0
0
davedotco said:
Sospri said:
I would not bother putting an extra layer of rubber between the 2 surfaces as the speakers need to be as stable as possible, otherwise I cannot see a problem with this idea..............
I really am in horror of the entire concept.

I am personally quite convinced that speakers need to be rigidly coupled to the floor, by years of practical experience installing speakers and systems in peoples homes. Quite why, I am at a loss to understand, and it does vary from speaker to speaker but it does appear to be important.

I have sold and installed systems where the customer has been dissapointed in a lack of focus and precision of the system in his home compared to the shop and in many cases this has been solved by mounting the speakers more rigidly, usually by driving screws into the floorboards and mounting the speaker spikes on the screw heads. (As was normal practice in the shop)

I can recall an occasion where a customer insisted that I come out and hear how poor his system was sounding, he was a nice bloke so I was happy to do so. The system sounded terrible, a brash, fractured quality overlayed everything but I fixed the problem while the chap was making a cup of tea, about 2-3 minutes.

The speakers had clearly been moved, in fact left and right had been swapped, they were not 'handed' in any way, both speaker/stand combination was identical but the screws in the floor were not, quite. The spikes on the stands were supposed to fit in to the 'crosses' on the screwheads (that were driven into the floorboards) but they were loose and rattling. Swap left and right over, settle the spikes firmly in the screwheads and by the time we were sitting down with our tea the problem was solved.
As my wife has eventually got used to the size of the speakers she is now in horror of the size of the dollies so I will kill this idea and keep the floor spikes.

Thanks all who responded

Paul
 

Daveperc

New member
Oct 20, 2013
4
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Cue reverse psychology speaker buying strategy:

First you buy secondhand the biggest boxed speakers you can find - never mind the sound, it's size that matters.

Wife/partner (to be PC!) complains, and you agree to see if you can find something smaller that will do (looking sad and frustrated)

Head for Hifi dealer to buy what you always wanted (or could afford) as long as it's smaller than your giants!

Wife pleased with "more sensible speakers" - you sell giants, hopefully at a profit!

:clap:
 

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