How Rogers Hi-Fi is bringing back some iconic BBC speakers

podknocker

Well-known member
Feb 5, 2021
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I know the BBC needed a small studio speaker, back in the 70s, mainly for the accurate reproduction of voice and not so much for high bandwidth music. I'm puzzled why there are still speaker companies, trying to reiterate this design, when modern recording, or radio studios, tend to use something a little more modern and capable of doing much more than the LS3/5A could. Modern materials and production methods, have given us technically and visually, better products. Goodmans, Rogers, Harbeth, Spendor, KEF (I think), have produced the classic BBC LS3/5A design many times, but I'm wondering if this BBC studio monitor really needs further releases. I'm sure there are UK speaker companies, the BBC could use. Perhaps, the BBC could use the new version of the Mission 770 and although it's a revision, it is a lot bigger and must be capable of providing all the BBC needs. The LS3/5A design, to me, just seems outdated and unnecessary. It's the same for the bigger model: https://www.whathifi.com/reviews/rogers-ls-59 Not much use outside a BBC Radio 4 studio and not exactly a bargain.
 
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WayneKerr

Well-known member
Jan 21, 2022
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I know the BBC needed a small studio speaker, back in the 70s, mainly for the accurate reproduction of voice and not so much for high bandwidth music. I'm puzzled why there are still speaker companies, trying to reiterate this design, when modern recording, or radio studios, tend to use something a little more modern and capable of doing much more than the LS3/5A could. Modern materials and production methods, have given us technically and visually, better products. Goodmans, Rogers, Harbeth, Spendor, KEF (I think), have produced the classic BBC LS3/5A design many times, but I'm wondering if this BBC studio monitor really needs further releases. I'm sure there are UK speaker companies, the BBC could use. Perhaps, the BBC could use the new version of the Mission 770 and although it's a revision, it is a lot bigger and must be capable of providing all the BBC needs. The LS3/5A design, to me, just seems outdated and unnecessary. It's the same for the bigger model: https://www.whathifi.com/reviews/rogers-ls-59 Not much use outside a BBC Radio 4 studio and not exactly a bargain.
Have you ever heard any of these "BBC" speakers?
 

podknocker

Well-known member
Feb 5, 2021
112
51
670
I've never heard any of these speakers. I'm sure they sound great, for their intended purpose and meet the brief, perfectly. I just can't understand why the same models are released over and over again. There are many speakers out there, that could do the same job, for a lot less money and be very modern looking also. I think the BBC could use modern speakers, which use the latest materials and expertise, but could also look betterand cope with the demands of many scenarios and installations, not just the limited scope of these speakers. Having monitor speakers, that reproduce the human voice perfectly, but perhaps couldn't cope with much else, seems to be a very niche and limiting design. The 'new' Rogers LS 5/9 is nearly 5 grand and uses 30 year old crossovers, they had spare. That's a joke.
 
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WayneKerr

Well-known member
Jan 21, 2022
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I've never heard any of these speakers. I'm sure they sound great, for their intended purpose and meet the brief, perfectly. I just can't understand why the same models are released over and over again. There are many speakers out there, that could do the same job, for a lot less money and be very modern looking also. I think the BBC could use modern speakers, which use the latest materials and expertise, but could also look betterand cope with the demands of many scenarios and installations, not just the limited scope of these speakers. Having monitor speakers, that reproduce the human voice perfectly, but perhaps couldn't cope with much else, seems to be a very niche and limiting design. The 'new' Rogers LS 5/9 is nearly 5 grand and uses 30 year old crossovers, they had spare. That's a joke.
I would suggest that your get your ears wrapped around a set of "BBC design" monitors and then report back... I think you may be pleasantly surprised as to their abilities, it's not only the human voice they do well. Personally I own a set of Harbeth P3's and their naturalness and tonality astound me. However, I do agree with you that some of these speakers are a ridiculous price.
 
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Gray

Well-known member
I've never heard any of these speakers. I'm sure they sound great, for their intended purpose and meet the brief, perfectly. I just can't understand why the same models are released over and over again. There are many speakers out there, that could do the same job, for a lot less money and be very modern looking also. I think the BBC could use modern speakers, which use the latest materials and expertise, but could also look betterand cope with the demands of many scenarios and installations, not just the limited scope of these speakers. Having monitor speakers, that reproduce the human voice perfectly, but perhaps couldn't cope with much else, seems to be a very niche and limiting design. The 'new' Rogers LS 5/9 is nearly 5 grand and uses 30 year old crossovers, they had spare. That's a joke.
The BBC have used little Dynaudio's in their radio studios for a while now - maybe they got a good bulk discount.
I get your point about the apparent limitation of speakers designed with vocals in mind. But as Wayne said, they don't only do vocals well. And vocals are probably the best test for the accuracy of any speaker.
If they can't do vocals well, in terms of tonality, they will get much else wrong.
As well as fave music, a voice recording of someone you know well, such as a family member (but not your own voice) would be a good thing to take to demos.
 

WayneKerr

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Jan 21, 2022
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